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Discussion Starter #1
ok. I need some help. My Cayman has 20" summer tires that seem to "grab" my lightweight rhino ramps (off of my concrete garage floor) and suck them under the car. Even when I very slowly and carefully back on to them I can have a problem.

1. What am I doing wrong?
2. Is there a way to keep them from moving?
3. Is there a better (maybe heaver weight or more stationery) product I should be using?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Rhino Ramps have very little ramp-to-floor contact area because of their "honeycomb-like" construction. The contact area is probably 5% to 10% of the surface area covered by the ramp. The 17 degree incline angle may fit up against the rear tires without rubbing against the car, but this relatively steep angle may be contributing to your problem. Intuitively, it seems that you would have to apply more power to the rear wheels to climb a 17 degree slope than you would to climb an 11 degree or 7 degree slope which is typical of the incline on Race Ramps service ramps. The 17 degree ramps are probably too steep for the front of the car.

Race Ramps feature a solid core EPS foam construction and are coated with a material that is similar to truck bed liner. The coating has a textured finish. The actual ramp-to-floor contact area varies somewhat depending upon whether you use the ramps on a smooth garage floor, a concrete or asphalt drive, or grass. I would estimate that there is at least a 50% contact area on a smoother surface like your garage floor.

The slope on most Race Ramps service ramps is so shallow that you barely realize that you are climbing a grade when you drive up the ramps. It is not necessary to gun the throttle to get up the ramps and then slam on the brakes to keep from going over the stop on the platform.

When choosing a ramp model it's a good idea to estimate how much the nose of the car will drop as you back up onto the ramps. If you have a 90" wheel base with a 30" overhang (front axle to front edge of bumper) and you back up a 9" high ramp, then the nose of the car will drop by about 3". So if you have less than 3" of clearance under the front of the car, a ramp with a 9" high platform would be too tall.

The popular 56" and 67" Race Ramps have a 10.8 degree incline. Reverse Logic has been selling customer Race Ramps models with a more shallow slope. We offer several two-stage incline ramp models with an initial incline of 6.8 degrees. Our RLL-80-2 ramp has a cradle top platform and an invertible incline section that can also be used as a trailer ramp. I am just about to launch two new ramp models which will share the same 9" high platform as the RLL-80-2 ramp model.

Race Ramps - Best Prices, Expert Service, Custom Designs

RLL-80-2_Rev-2.png
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think you are correct about the 17 degree angle. It takes more rpm to get up it slowly and with so little contact area on the concert floor it makes it difficult to stay planted. It makes sense to me. I was thinking the reduced angle was only a benefit to guys even lower than me (say a GT3) but I see how it would also benefit my situation. I thought about placing the ramps at the edge of my drive way on the lawn so that the leading edge of the ramp is positioned against the edge of the driveway to keep it from moving once the rear tire grabs it, but I would rather have a product that will work properly in my garage with resorting to using my lawn as platform for a 3,000 lb car.

Thank you for your input.
Look forward to see your new product!
I may be customer number one.
 

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I have never had that problem with my Rhino Ramps. I start from a rolling start - positioning the ramps about 6" from the tires before making my run up them. Just put something like an old towel or throw-rug under the ramps that extends a few inches forward of the incline. Then the car's weight will hold the rug and ramp in place.
 

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You can always put one of these large rubber backed shop mats under your ramps, as long as your cement pad isn't super cold, it shouldn't slip. I used this method until I installed what you see in the second shot. Much better!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you very much for the advice.



You can always put one of these large rubber backed shop mats under your ramps, as long as your cement pad isn't super cold, it shouldn't slip. I used this method until I installed what you see in the second shot. Much better!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The rolling start helps but the towel/rug idea hopefully will help the ramps from moving.
Thanks!

I have never had that problem with my Rhino Ramps. I start from a rolling start - positioning the ramps about 6" from the tires before making my run up them. Just put something like an old towel or throw-rug under the ramps that extends a few inches forward of the incline. Then the car's weight will hold the rug and ramp in place.
 

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+1 on the Race Ramps. Lower incline angle is easy to back up onto. They never slip on my garage floor.

The 2 piece design is nice for storage, and side access once on the ramps. I recommend them.

172339487.png

:cheers:
 

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I use Rhino ramps all the time but my "trick" is to back out of the garage onto the driveway which is slightly angled. Gives a bit more headroom as well.
 

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I've never actually driven up my rhino ramps. Jack it up, then slide the ramp underneath the wheel. It takes an extra 2 minutes per wheel.
 
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I've never actually driven up my rhino ramps. Jack it up, then slide the ramp underneath the wheel. It takes an extra 2 minutes per wheel.
Exactly how I have been doing my last 3 cars. Have a Harbor Freight Low-Profile jack ($90) and set of ABS plastic ramps from Autozone I use to keep the car high enough to work under. I feel very safe under the car when both wheels are on the ramps oppose to jack stands, and I use the same ramps on the front of the car using this method as well.
 

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You definitely need something to keep the harder plastic ramps from sliding as noted here most of the angles are very steep. Too much throttle and you can kill a rocker or a bumper....ask me how I know !!

David
 

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What vintage are your rhino ramps? I've had mine for a while now. They came with a rubber foot at the start of the ramp. As soon as the tire hits it the ramp seems glued to the floor. Just back up with no drama or slipping. No running start needed.

Not to say that the race ramps or other option mentioned aren't better but rhino gets the job done.
 
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