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I'm looking into getting a used 2006 well optioned cayman S. There are a couple of red flags though. It was noted to be a Fleet Vehicle which I thought is odd. What kind of company has Porsche Caymans as company cars? Also, I would be the 3rd owner. The car has 22,000 miles but I don't know how hard those miles were especially being a fleet vehicle. Is it worth me spending the $800 to have the car shipped to the dealer in my city to look at?

thanks!
 

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Do you have/know of a good independent Porsche mechanic. He should have a means to read the over rev history stored in the car computer. If you do, you do not have to take it to the dealer.

You can inspect the tires and wheels, note the brand and wear, look at the wheels for curb rash and straightness. The latter is better done putting the wheel in a balancing machine. Have some one that knows paint a good bodyshop mechanic take a look at the car. Within minutes he will be able to tell you if it ha been in accident, and if it has been repainted.

With that in hand you can make a good decision. I realize most people do not have in hand a good bodyshop technitian in your left pocket and a good independent mechanic in your right one. Developing a good an honest relationship with them have been an important experience for the enjoyment of my car.

Dealership quality varies from trully outstanding, to mediocre to just poor. If you live in an island you have to live with what is there, you can not go to the next Porsche dealer.

Good luck
 

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Also, don't read too much into a Carfax report. Many times fleet really means leased. Depending upon how the dealership took the car into inventory could also trigger it showing as an owner. Call and ask! (Then get a PPI as noted above.)
 

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I'm looking into getting a used 2006 well optioned cayman S. There are a couple of red flags though. It was noted to be a Fleet Vehicle which I thought is odd. What kind of company has Porsche Caymans as company cars? Also, I would be the 3rd owner. The car has 22,000 miles but I don't know how hard those miles were especially being a fleet vehicle. Is it worth me spending the $800 to have the car shipped to the dealer in my city to look at?

thanks!
My company has a cayman s as a fleet vehicle. It is my company and my company car. 70% write-off. ;)
 

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Unfortunately the car is thousands of miles away and I can't get it PPI'ed before I pay $800 to have it shipped. That's just the way the dealership does it. I think I'm going to do it though. It's pretty low mileage and doesn't have any mods. So I'm crossing my fingers that it hasn't been tracked. Thanks for the advice!
 

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Also, don't read too much into a Carfax report. Many times fleet really means leased. Depending upon how the dealership took the car into inventory could also trigger it showing as an owner. Call and ask! (Then get a PPI as noted above.)
If it's a true fleet vehicle, chances are it was owned by a small company and was the owner's car. This would probably mean that it had very good care in that part of its life. I bought a 2 owner CS with 16K on it and it was in fantastic condition. After owning it 6 months and having my own service lift, I've really been through this car. I found some scraping under the front nose...no surprise there...normal driving will do that. I found one tiny nick on one of the 19" wheels. I found some leaves under the front cowl but not in the radiators. I bought my car from a dealer in Savannah, GA and drove it home.

As kptaylor said, "fleet vehicle" may just mean it was leased. Depends on the state it was registered. Most leasing companies demand that owners maintain by the book and inspect the car carefully before they take it back, but that doesn't really help you. If the leasee abused the car, he would have had to pay the leasing company, but they would be under no obligation to make it perfect before selling it.

A viewing of the bottom of the car for impact damage, replaced parts etc. would be a very good idea. Also would be good to have a good body shop inspect the car for repair work and replaced panels. The over-rev data would be another good thing to see and a good visual inspection of the wheels would be instructive. Dinged up wheels don't always mean the car was abused, but you can negotiate if some or all of the wheels need replacement to be perfect. Owner will probably give an allowance for wheel damage. If they're just scratched and not dented, you can use them or or sell them for track wheels.

These drive trains are pretty tough although I think it might be easy to damage a half-shaft accelerating hard on uneven pavement with the open diff, so check the CV joints and the half-shafts.

There is no valve adjustment required so the old hazards of DIYers mucking up the engine trying to do their own tune-ups don't really apply. The only other abuse is lack of servicing and the car doesn't really have enough miles on it for that to be a huge issue.

I'd take an allowance for the sketchy history and another for any sort of wheel damage you might find and take a chance on this car. If it looks good and runs good, it's probably good.

Look at my signature and you'll see that my car also came pretty well-equipped. It had all the items I considered vital and quite a bit more. There were other local cars with lower miles but the wrong options.

Things I USE on my car: PASM (Sport setting is stiff enough for track use. Normal is more comfortable than standard suspension and great for 19" wheels, which I only use on the street because my car came with them and they look so great. I'd sooner have a sexy set of 18" wheels for street use), Sport Chrono (I use the Sport setting all the time like most people...even with the Flash and Plenum, it's just better. If your car doesn't have Sport Chrono, you can get the Sport setting put on permanently if you get a Softronic Flash for the car later. It makes a big difference...tell them to do it and you'll have equivelent of SC "Sport" on all the time. You'll like it.), Navigation (It's old-school, but it's charming and, after a long session with the Owner's Manual, I can make it work for what I need. I have a Garmin I can stick on the windshield, but it's not convenient unless I'm doing a long trip. The PCM GPS has a Map function that's really handy to just put on just to see where you are if you don't need route planning.), Bose (Do the subwoofer stuffing procedure in the Articles section of this site. It's quite good with the enclosure modified in this way and quite boom-box bad without the mod.); Non-power seats (I get an extra inch of head-room over power seats. My tall passengers get an extra inch of backwards seat travel. Non-power seats have electric backrest angle adjustment. It's all you need.) Xenon headlights (Mine were aimed a little too high when I bought the car and they were bothering other drivers. I had them adjusted and love them now.)

Stuff I got that I can live without: Heated seats (everyone loves them. I never use them or need them. I have a garage.) Self-dimming mirrors (Sometimes I don't want the rear view mirrors dimmed. They make me feel like I'm in a cave or something.); Homelink (It doesn't function when the car is off and I'm always shutting off before closing the garage door. Having an extra battery powered button somewhere out of site is much better.)

Should have got: Auto Climate Control. Strangely, this car doesn't have it and I spend a lot of time adjusting the temp. Temp control is digital on this car and it's not very intuitive. You have to look down at the stupid display when you adjust and you never really know how much to move it. I'd rather have a round dial to turn like on a Honda. Climate Control would save my having to mess with it so much.

Stuff I don't have and don't think is needed: Full Leather Interior: Fine if you find a car that's got it, but not a must-have. The standard interiors are really great and more durable than full leather...They require less maintenance. Rain Sensing Wipers: By definition, these things will never work quite the way you want them to. If your wipers are not nice and new, the sensor will over-wipe and drive you nuts.

I only know one dealer that I'd trust to inspect a car I was thinking of buying. I've never ever done this and I've purchased a ton of used cars from private parties.

Only one, a 1978 (first year) BMW 733i, was a real money pit. It had a transitional pollution control with an air pump, had L-Jetronic injection, which was very complicated and would never allow the car to start below 10 degrees F no matter what. That never got fixed. If it got cold out, you just parked it until it warmed up. Starting fluid didn't work. Nothing worked and the dealer could never get it to happen, so they never fixed it.

It had a rusted exhaust which was prohibitively expensive to replace. I did the work myself and it still cost nearly $1,800 just for parts...beautiful dual pipe with mufflers and resonators...all one gorgeous piece.

Servo power brake system needed an $800 replacement part...plus labor. The Borg-Warner automatic had to have major surgery...near $2,000. When we had it up on a lift, we noticed that the driver's side rear floor had a sizeable dent in it indicating that the car had been off the road at some point.

Driver's door handle broke off in my hand one cold morning. Replacement was $850 including labor. Then I read where replacement of a heater core on this car costs in excess of $5,000. I traded that car in on a new Buick Electra T Type. In spite of having a bit more plastic and everyday materials, everything worked on it and I felt like the cat who just ate the canary! Was so happy to be rid of that 7. I think the Buick was quicker in normal driving too because of the much better automatic. It was just as comfortable...maybe better handling because it was 500 lbs lighter...and it had...a WARRANTY! :banana:

These Caymans are build much better than those 70's BMWs were. I'd bought the wrong car in the wrong year from a guy who didn't take care of it. It was still a very nice car, just very expensive to put right. In contrast, the CS has been a joy to buy and to own since the first day. No problems at all.

Good luck!
 

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I wouldn't worry too much if the car was on the track once in a while. The engine was built for that. You are basically buying a street legal race car. :cheers:
 

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I think you could probably find an indie Porsche mechanic to do an inspection for less. Check out the local Porsche club where you are buying it. They probably list a few indies on their site. I live in NM and there are two or three local, very good independents here. Shouldn't be a problem finding one. Track day occasionally---wouldn't worry about that.
 
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