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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just a rant as my CS is out of commission until my new PS2 arrives due to a sidewall bulge.

If I had a spare I could either put it on or risk a blowout due to the bulge, but because all we have is the goo the CS sits in the garage for a week or so until the tire arrives and it can be mounted. :(

(Yes, it was my fault - a pothole a while back, and though I can feel a very slight bend to the wheel the tire is holding air just fine, so I doubt I'll get the wheel itself fixed as were it not for the bulge, you'd never know the wheel was at all injured.)
 

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A sidewall bulge is a PITA, but a spare in recent Porsche terms wouldn't buy you anything. The space-saver spares Porsche has been using are for emergency use only, and good for (officially) 50 miles. What you seem to want is a full-sized spare, which would be quite a feat, considering every P-sports car has different wheel and tire sizes front and rear. Even if it were a full-size front wheel and tire, the handling differences on the rear would make it emergency use only. I suppose on a front position it could be a change-and-go situation, but then you'd be hauling around an extra 50lbs all the time, plus say another 10lbs for a jack and tools, and you'd need to reserve the space for a rear-position flat.

I think you'll find full-size spares are the realm of large sedans or cars with much more modestly-sized wheels and tires.
 

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I have been thinking about buying a used wheel and mounting one of my present tires on it the next time I replace the tires. I will keep it in my garage. At least if I get a flat somewhere near here I can have my wife or a friend bring me the spare. It would be enough to get me to Atlanta (140 miles away) where I could get a new tire or wheel.
(Another alternative is to buy a set of winter tires and wheels and use one of them in an emergency.)
I realize that this would not be optimal and I certainly would not drive at all aggressively with the mis-matched tire - but it would certainly be better than one those space savers.
mike
 

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You know... Flats suck regardless. But it would be hard to carry two different sized spares in the Cayman and have any room for people.

Winter tires on a spare set of wheels is a great idea. So is having a set of track tires on seperate wheels. Either can be used for a temporary spare.

I have a set of 18" Boxster S wheels I've got reserved for track tires...Haven't loaded them with sticky rubber yet. Still looking around.

I will not use that Porsche goo on my wheels. The goo is a real pain to get out of the inside of your wheels. I put it on a shelf in the garage and used the space in the tool area to carry a rope type tubless repair kit. This type of repair works fine for most flats if you know "the ropes":crazy:. You shoudn't drive at very high speed with a repair tire and shouldn't consider it any better than a space saver...order a new tire right away.

If you have a sidewall bulge that breaks, neither goo or ropes will be any help. It's Porsche Roadside Assistance time. :beer::beer::beer:


-Six
 

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Caymudgeon
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A collapsable spare from 996 C4 or 996 turbo will fit in the front trunk. Search this site to find part numbers. I bought one from a dismantler and I always bring it with me to DEs in case I need a spare on the way home.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
A sidewall bulge is a PITA, but a spare in recent Porsche terms wouldn't buy you anything. The space-saver spares Porsche has been using are for emergency use only, and good for (officially) 50 miles.
Right - but given my commute that would serve me for a week!

I've also been quite vocal about the lack of a spare for other reasons, not the least of which is that if you get a flat somewhere outside of cell phone range in the Cayman, you're going to have a long, long wait. :(

(Before you say "out of cell phone range" I live in a suburb and can go literally one mile down the street and have zero bars. :( )
 

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I've also been quite vocal about the lack of a spare for other reasons, not the least of which is that if you get a flat somewhere outside of cell phone range in the Cayman, you're going to have a long, long wait. :(
I know what you mean. I did a lot of travelling this summer, favoring rural roads where I was out of cell phone range much of the time. The lack of a spare was on my mind, and I kept the TPMS display up continuously. I also brushed up on the owners' manual instructions for using the sealant, and I carried a plug kit. (Though I have to admit that plugging a tire by the side of the road is probably not something I'd do unless the sealant failed.)

Nonetheless, the comments in my earlier post still stands; would we really want Porsche to degrade handling with smaller, symmretic wheels and tires, so that we could carry a full-size spare?
 

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A collapsable spare from 996 C4 or 996 turbo will fit in the front trunk. Search this site to find part numbers. I bought one from a dismantler and I always bring it with me to DEs in case I need a spare on the way home.
+1; I picked up an emergency tire last year of a 986 Boxster and take it with me to DE's. Not a perfect solution, but if the sidewall gets punctured I'll at least be able to drive the car somewhere to have the flat changed. Agreed on the driving in remote areas--even in the eastern US there are large areas(PA comes to mind)--where cellphone coverage is lacking.
 

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Right - but given my commute that would serve me for a week!

I've also been quite vocal about the lack of a spare for other reasons, not the least of which is that if you get a flat somewhere outside of cell phone range in the Cayman, you're going to have a long, long wait. :(

(Before you say "out of cell phone range" I live in a suburb and can go literally one mile down the street and have zero bars. :( )

I have written on this topic here and now have the Vredestein space saver spare in my front trunk. Short of have a spare setup of tires and wheels. that is about as good as you are going to get. I suppose a spare front wheel and rear wheel with a tire capable of being mounted on either side stored in your garage would allow you to get home, to mount the wheel, and you would be good to go.

Search "flat tire", and "spare tire" for helpful threads.
 

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I would not drive any car without a spare tire. I have an 09 CS. Remove the trunk panel holding the tool kit and can of tire sealer. Now there is room for a spare tire. I used the spare from my 2002 Turbo and it fits quite well. Get a tool kit and jack from same and you are all set. Do not drive over 55 and the tire will take you a long way. I had a rear tire blowout in my Turbo and drove on this type of spare for 200 miles.
 

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Quoting old school:
"I would not drive any car without a spare tire. I have an 09 CS. Remove the trunk panel holding the tool kit and can of tire sealer. Now there is room for a spare tire. I used the spare from my 2002 Turbo and it fits quite well. Get a tool kit and jack from same and you are all set."

What about pooling knowledge and experience to come up with a sticky list of spare tire alternatives (and likely sources for the same) in addition to the Vredestein setup that will definitely fit 2006-10 Caymans? Something alone the lines of segueway 007's "Wheel/Tire Setups that worked" sticky in the Tires & Wheels Forum? My search skills may be primitive, but I've searched and found no comparable listing.

Babbo
2010 CS on order
 

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I would not drive any car without a spare tire. I have an 09 CS. Remove the trunk panel holding the tool kit and can of tire sealer. Now there is room for a spare tire. I used the spare from my 2002 Turbo and it fits quite well. Get a tool kit and jack from same and you are all set. Do not drive over 55 and the tire will take you a long way. I had a rear tire blowout in my Turbo and drove on this type of spare for 200 miles.
Yeah, I'm with you... but if a rear tire has the problem, where are you going to put it? The space-saver spare fits in the front, but where would you put the full-size rear?

(PS - the best idea I've heard yet is to bring a folding shovel and a camera with you, along with the space-saver spare. You use the shovel to bury the full-size rear in a hidden spot, and take some pictures of the area so you can find it again, and come back to retrieve it later. :) )
 

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AFAIK all space savers of any brand are limited to 50/50 in miles and mph.

I view my spare as either limp home or limp to a tire place for repair, temp repair or replacement. Maybe even buy a cheap replacement tire until I could order the correct tire.

An alternative is to buy the smallest wheel that will fit and the smallest conventional tire that will fit on it.

One thing I did not see, but might have missed, is the need to secure the spare - not just drop it in the trunk.

And the transport of the bad tire IS a problem. I have a Tire Rack bag and plan to set the tire in the passenger seat (if unoccupied) or the rear trunk, which might mean moving stuff to the passenger compartment.
 

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I put the blown out tire and wheel in a large garbage bag on the passenger seat. I imagine that it may fit in the rear of the Cayman, however, I do not know. As for securing the spare, I just wedged it in the trunk so that it is snug. If my car rolls over, and the spare damages the hood of my car, I think that I may have larger issues to deal with at that point.
 

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If you are unsure of how a tire/wheel fits or does not fit inside various parts of the Cayman there are photos that a member took to show the sad details. You are on your own to find them. I've done that too many times now.
 

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An alternative is to buy the smallest wheel that will fit and the smallest conventional tire that will fit on it.

One thing I did not see, but might have missed, is the need to secure the spare - not just drop it in the trunk.
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Heres how to secure the spare.

http://www.planet-9.com/cayman-boxster-tires-wheels/15433-spare-tire-question.html







Buying any ole small wheel is going to be a problem due to the large brake calipers.

If my flat is a front tire, it goes in the back, if my flat is the rear, it goes in the rear with the rear with the hatch open slightly, or in the passenger seat.
 

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All been discussed several times before.
- A 17" Boxster "donut" spare fits easily in the front trunk or rear hatch area and can be used front or rear of a Cayman or CS without any clearance issues. That kit (spare, foam insert, jack & tools) seems to be regularly available on eBay or from salvage yards for $300 +/-. Boxster Spare
- An 18" or 19" oem front wheel & fully inflated tire will just fit atop the engine allowing the hatch to close. An oem rear of any variety will not allow the hatch to close, but could be carried in a pinch using bungee cords (you do carry a few, don't you?) to hold the hatch down.
 
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