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by: pushtiulk

Description: Now, I will present you an interview with Richard Lin aka OctaneGuy, the producer of Black WOW. PushtiulK: Tell us a few words about yourself...? Richard (OctaneGuy): I'm Richard (OctaneGuy) from ShowCarDetailing.com and I love black paint. There is no better color for a car. However you have to be OCD to maintain it. PushtiulK: What made you start in detailing business? OctaneGuy: My old friend and then business partner Mike Phillips showed me the benefits of using a system, and it really just took off from there. PushtiulK: What year did you start selling detailing products? OctaneGuy: 2005 was the year I launched my first instructional DVD, "How to Use the PC for Show Car Results" PushtiulK: What car do you drive? OctaneGuy: I own a highly modded 220whp custom painted 2005 MINI Cooper S with the license plate OBSSSSD. I also drive a classic 1988 Toyota MR2 that is mostly stock. PushtiulK: How often do you detail your car? OctaneGuy: Now that I have a garage again, I'm doing it weekly or after it rains. But I feel guilty working on my car instead of working on a customers car so I tend to choose the system that gets the job done quickest while achieving the results I want. PushtiulK: What detailing product do you like the most? OctaneGuy: Prima Hydro. It's a synthetic spray wax that you spray on and wipe off. I use it on my wheels, door jambs, and anywhere that I want protection without the hassles of traditional products where you have to let them dry, haze, and wipe off. PushtiulK: Do you remember what was the first detailing product sold by you? Can you tell us about it? OctaneGuy: I think I started off like a lot car enthusiasts with over the counter stuff like Nu Finish and Turtle Wax. I really didn't know much at age 15 about car care. PushtiulK: What low cost detailing product you like the most? OctaneGuy: Prima Banana Gloss, a super easy to use carnauba wax that flash cures. Easy to use, versatile, and makes any paint look substantially better with very little effort. PushtiulK: Can you describe the experience the first time you detailed? OctaneGuy: The first time I truly detailed wasn't until after I bought my first MINI Cooper in 2003. Prior to that I was just messing around. Having said that, the first time I truly detailed, I was blown away by the results and I wanted to become the best I could, and teach that to everyone. PushtiulK: How important is cleaning, paint correction and protection? OctaneGuy: It's everything. You have to spend the time to properly prep any car regardless of whether you are correcting paint or not. I also always strive to move forward in the process, meaning the paint needs to be properly evaluated for determining the level of correction necessary. Everything is important, down to the type of water and solutions you use for cleaning. Paint Correction is what separates me from the "mobile car wash detailer". 95% of the cars I work on are black and usually have been damaged by another detailer or body shop and the customer has found me to restore the paint. Every customer that leaves is grateful for "saving" their car. When it comes to protection, I have a different process for black and dark colored cars than light colored paint. However every car I work on is already "finished" before being protected, meaning, protection is important to seal the hard work that I put in and can enhance that work but it's only one part of the final look. Training the owner and correcting bad maintenance habits is also key. PushtiulK: Do you prefer the wax applications by hand or by applicators and how many layers of wax should we use in your opinion? OctaneGuy: It depends on the product. For synthetic waxes, I love machine application. Prima Banana Gloss flash cures so it's hand applied only. On the end of a 30 hour detail, machine applied waxes are the norm for me. If I'm just doing a quick maintenance wash and wax, I'll probably work by hand especially if its my own car. Uniform coverage is important rather than layers. Two coats is sufficient. PushtiulK: How many hours did it take for you to make your longest detail process? OctaneGuy: 36 hours for exterior work only. I hate to be rushed. PushtiulK: What does it take to be a very good detailer? OctaneGuy: A good critical eye, expert product knowledge, good tools, and lots of experience on a variety of paints. Being knowledgeable about how cars are painted is also important. PushtiulK: What should a newby do to become a good detailer? OctaneGuy: Practice on everything from family cars to coworkers vehicles. Learn everything there is to learn and keep on learning. Realize that online detailing forums are sponsored and therefore will be pushing products that may or may not be in your best interest. You will make mistakes, lots of them and that is very important before you start charging for work. Don't put the cart before the horse. I've seen it far too many times where a person wants to get into the detailing business but doesn't know the first thing about detailing. Learn the trade, become an expert, then go into business. PushtiulK: In detailling, what do you think the most common errors are? OctaneGuy: Listening to friends that give bad advice. Also not sticking to a process. PushtiulK: Do you think steam wash and waterless wash are benefic for the car? OctaneGuy: Beneficial for the car or the environment? It depends on how it's used. I've seen cars steam washed and wiped down with dirty towels that were sitting on wooden pallets so they also had wood shavings in them. I use distilled bottled water with a pressure washer or ONR for washing. I also use a 2 or 3 bucket wash method for either process. PushtiulK: What other activities do you enjoy doing when you are not detailing or selling products? OctaneGuy: Canyon carving in my MINI, playing with technology, talking with others about detailing, MINIs, and technology, lol. PushtiulK: How did you learned to polish? OctaneGuy: I attended a Meguiar's clinic through my car club and got to be good friends with the trainer and we started making training videos together, and I got exposed to some of the best paint polishers around. PushtiulK: The care you like is ..... because ..... OctaneGuy: The car I like is BLACK with lots of curves because it's the BEST! PushtiulK: The car you like to detail is ..... because .... OctaneGuy: The car I like to detail is BLACK with lots of swirls and holograms because restoring it brings great satisfaction to me. PushtiulK: How the idea of Black WOW came to your mind? OctaneGuy: MINI Coopers have a lot of plastic, and I was tired of products that lasted only a short time. I envisioned a product that would perform like no other product so I spoke to my father who is a chemist and we came up with a formula. I tested it within the MINI community for 6 months before launching it. I also held a naming contest and had over 150 entries, but I wasn't satisfied with any of them. That's when I realized that the most common reaction to seeing BW used is "WOW, that's Black"...and that's how Black Wow was named. PushtiulK: What do you like to detail the most : a everyay car or a supercar? OctaneGuy: I like to detail the cars where the owner really appreciates his car and what I can do for it. The price doesn't really matter. If the owner cares about his car and wants me to work on it, that says a lot. However I tend to do a lot of BMW M3's, Porsches, Maserati's and Aston Martins all in black. PushtiulK: If you have something more to say ..... OctaneGuy: Paint polishing is extremely rewarding work although it can be frustrating at times. You need to be mindful about what you are doing at all times to prevent making mistakes. Always look for potential liabilities and protect yourself so you don't become a victim in your quest for perfection. You can't correct what you can't see, so don't try to polish paint without proper lighting. I've built a rig that allows me to see paint in its worst light so that I can make the proper corrections. Customers expect the best from me, and I strive to provide that at all times. Stick to a system. Once you've mastered a system, keep using it until you find something that works better. Never stop learning, and beware of detailers that spend more time on forums advising than detailing. Thank you Richard.

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