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Next week I am leaving to Europe for one month vacation, while my beast will remain garaged at home. Just this morning I realized that my car's battery would die during my trip. And in this remote town that I work in, I can't find CTech, battery tender or any similar. And it is too late to order any online.

I guess I am out of options but live with the consequences. My question is, when I come back from my trip what do I need to do to bring back my CS to life?
 

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Just unhook the battery before you leave...
 

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If parked in a garage, leave the front trunk open. If the battery dies, there will be no juice to activate the solenoid to open it.
Last year I left my car for 5 weeks with the trunk open. My son comes home a couple days before me, closes the trunk, gets in the car and it starts right up!
 

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Porsche dealers in the US stock a battery tender. Did you check with them? Unhooking the battery and leaving the front bonnet open is a good option. However if the battery is fully charged and in good condition four weeks will "probably" be safe but there is always a risk.
 

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1) Thank you jman and bigwong for your suggestions. I see everybody here agrees on disconnecting the battery.

2) DrKareem, I thought your snowball is coming to town soon ;) I am afraid she'll be jealous :hilarious:

3)
Porsche dealers in the US stock a battery tender. Did you check with them? Unhooking the battery and leaving the front bonnet open is a good option. However if the battery is fully charged and in good condition four weeks will "probably" be safe but there is always a risk.
Santa Fe, I don't live in the USA. I will be traveling there later this year again inshallah to attend my brother's engagement but I don't live there. As for unhooking the battery, I will check out the owner's manual to see how to do so. But I can't figure out why would I keep the hood open. Can you please explain? Do I need to do so even if I remove the battery out? Do I keep it unlocked or wide open? And why?

Thank you all for your time and help.
 

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Of course I know you don't live in the US but the suggestion is that since US dealers almost all stock the tender perhaps yours does as well.

If the battery is disconnected there will be no current to open the hood.
 

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I just came back from a month long holiday and I took no precautions. The keyfob no longer worked when I returned but I just opened the drivers door with the key and put the key in the ignition and started her up.

Who would have thunk?

G.
 

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I just came back from a month long holiday and I took no precautions. The keyfob no longer worked when I returned but I just opened the drivers door with the key and put the key in the ignition and started her up.

Who would have thunk?

G.
The system is designed to work that way - after seven days, a locked car goes into a deeper sleep, and the door must be opened with the key in the lock. After that, the fob will operate again.

brad
 

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The system is designed to work that way - after seven days, a locked car goes into a deeper sleep, and the door must be opened with the key in the lock. After that, the fob will operate again.

brad
That is good to know. I can just see myself start to cycle up after coming home from a couple of weeks on vacation and trying to open the car door. :eek:
 

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Next week I am leaving to Europe for one month vacation, while my beast will remain garaged at home. Just this morning I realized that my car's battery would die during my trip. And in this remote town that I work in, I can't find CTech, battery tender or any similar. And it is too late to order any online.

I guess I am out of options but live with the consequences. My question is, when I come back from my trip what do I need to do to bring back my CS to life?
I've left my car alone for 4 - 6 weeks during cold winter temps, no precautions, and it started right up. I wouldn't expect a month away to kill your battery.
 

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I've left my car alone for 4 - 6 weeks during cold winter temps, no precautions, and it started right up. I wouldn't expect a month away to kill your battery.
I like your idea but my CS is a 2006 model with its original battery. The weather here is between 25 C at night to 45 C by noon. What would you do if you were in my shoes? (no worries; I won't hold you responsible :) )
 

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Sounds like you will be fine. I have an '06 CS. On May 17th I ended up in the hospital with acute pancreatitis. I was in the sick house for three weeks, and when I finally got home it was another few days before I felt good enough to try to start the car, so it was close to a month that the car sat there in the garage untouched. When I cranked it up, it started right away, no fuss. These are great, practical little machines.
 

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There are many experiences of batteries being fine after a month of disuse and a bunch more where they were dead. Depending on someone else's example means that your battery should be in the same condition, same environment, probably from the same manufacturing run and other similar factors to hope for the same. If the battery is not fully charged to begin with the risk is higher than a car that is used frequently, driven at the speed and the distance needed to keep it in excellent condition. It is best to evaluate how well your battery has been treated and make a decision based on that than to rely on others.

Again the number one call to Porsche roadside service is for dead batteries.
 

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A vacation without the mistress?
I would disconnect the battery and leave the hood open.
Don't forget to pump up the tires to about 60 psi to avoid flat spotting.
 

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The system is designed to work that way - after seven days, a locked car goes into a deeper sleep, and the door must be opened with the key in the lock. After that, the fob will operate again.

brad
I thought you were supposed to put the key in the lock (to wake it back up), then use the remote unlock (otherwise alarm is still on), then start up. I was under the impression that the key alone would open but not turn-off the alarm.
 

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I thought you were supposed to put the key in the lock (to wake it back up), then use the remote unlock (otherwise alarm is still on), then start up. I was under the impression that the key alone would open but not turn-off the alarm.
It is only the radio receiver that goes dead after a week. The alarm is still functioning. Putting the key in the door cylinder and turning to unlock will wake everything up. The remote receiver will then work again. Remember to press the unlock button before opening the door.
 
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