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I did my searching, here and on Rennlist and other Porsche forums...
Does anyone have any evidence: data, stories, etc. about PDK failures?
My search suggests it's an almost bullet-proof transmission. Which is probably a good thing, since it's incredibly complicated and costs a fortune to repair, if you can find someone who can work on it... Yes, I've read that it can be a little stiff when shifting from 1st to 2nd in cold weather, but so is the manual gearbox linkage. Maybe there are electronic gremlins that show up after 50,000miles? There are enough Porsches with PDK from years ago to establish a history of problems, surely? It first appeared in the 997.2 Carrera model, so there's five-plus years of experience to tap in to-what have we learned?
 

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I'm in! Eager to her the feedback.

- Patrick
 

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Yes. I had a failure with mine after only 1000 miles or so. It was an electronic problem with the actuator control unit. It got stuck in drive and would not move. There is a post from me last year explaining the saga. It took them a week and two electronic control units to fix it. It's been flawless in the 12000 miles since though.
 

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Phil,

Several years ago I attended the driving school in AL. We had two Cayman Rs/PDK to brutalize. After a few laps there were transmission error messages on both cars. They went into the barn, away from our grasp.

One of my instructors at a PCA DE had his '09 PDK become confused after a few laps of Sebring but then it recovered itself. I suspect the new ones are better because they are water cooling both clutch and differential fluids in 981s.

The mechanics at my local dealer said there have been a few PDKs in Macan go south. The Macan PDK is an Audi sourced unit.

Rob
 

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I know of 2 instances in a 2010 997.2 with around 15,000 miles on the clock and a 987.2, 2011 with 12,000 miles. Gearbox was replaced by the dealer. Little concerning, however after a good few years on P9 have heard of a handful of failures.
 

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I did my searching, here and on Rennlist and other Porsche forums...
Does anyone have any evidence: data, stories, etc. about PDK failures?
Rob is right. The Macan PDK is not the same. Neither is the TT or TTS PDK the same.

There are many threads across the net indicating the owner's displeasure with PDK problems. Whether or not their has been failures outside of warranty, I am not sure. It is very expensive to replace. The price for a new PDK
transmission for a 2012 Cayman, as an example, is $15,492 plus labor. Taken from another post ...


2014 minor failure

10/25/13 PDK totally replaced

5/10/09 PDK totally replaced

2/27/12 Day of delivery! PDK totally replaced

10/28/13 PDK totally replaced

3/18/14 Control unit replaced PLUS two others indicated the had failures

7/13/11 PDK totally replaced PLUS one other indicated PDK failure.

7/16/13 No result given.

3/11/11

10/25/11

1/23/14

10/2/13

3/18/14

1/10/12



These were the result of many 3 minutes of searching during the original post. I am sure there are many more.

Good luck with your search.
 

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I had my first "error message" at 78miles on the clock. It was "Transm. fault Poss. no R gear Drive on poss." message (picture attached). It didn't go away after I restarted the car. Got the car towed, and dealer said it is just a sensor misread. It never happened again.

Positive side. I ran the PDK on the track, about 4hours total in multiple sessions, and performed flawlessly.
 

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On my PDK equipped 981 CS I have noticed that sometimes it will hesitate briefly when I move the shift lever from D to R in order to back into a parking place.
 

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2010 2.9 Cayman with PDK
108,000 + miles with no issues, multiple track and autocross sessions
PDK serviced at normal service interval (think it was 60,000 miles for first service and just recently had second service completed)
 

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Not pdk, but my experience with vw/Audi triptronic/ dsg dual clutch transmissions is that they are pretty bulletproof. Parts wear, and shifts aren't thay tight or accurate, nonetheless less, they continue to work. I have been told changing the fluid is key, unlike older slush box transmissions where you might have the same fluid forever.

Its going to be hard to get enough data on pdk because it's fairly new. I'm sure we'll kpnow after 10 years though. Most news cars are made reliable enough nothing should break for 200k miles easy if you do the maintenance.
 

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My '09 CS has 81,000 miles. No problems with the PDK, or anything else.

We PDK fans may be oversensitive, but sometimes I detect some hostility towards this system; some MT users can barely disguise their angst. I can't help but think there is some effort by some to disparage PDK in this thread and in the referenced threads. My judgment of the data provided here is that 1) there were some infrequent teething issues, 2) there are cases of infant mortality, 3) there are Macan teething failures with little relevance to our cars, and 4) not many (any?) cases of a 987/981 PDK failing under other circumstances. In short, nothing to seriously detract from PDK's reputation as "bulletproof" as the term is normally used (that is, obviously, with a degree of hyperbole).

And to provide some context from a system with greater age, I offer this anecdote: When I bought a used 1999 Lexus RX300 in 2003, there was great anxiety in forums about transmission failures, especially since a replacement cost $10,000. This was scary stuff. It can be difficult to properly discount the "forum amplification" effect, but I'm glad I did - I sold the car a few months ago at 145,000 miles. Even in my small town, I see many of them still on the road.
 

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We PDK fans may be oversensitive, but sometimes I detect some hostility towards this system; some MT users can barely disguise their angst. I can't help but think there is some effort by some to disparage PDK in this thread and in the referenced threads.
Macans are "our cars". The OP did not ask about Boxsters or Caymans.

There are PDK failures, some you will never know about because most owners do not post on auto forums nor care one whit about them. So far, no one has posted that they paid to fix the units.

Most of the links I provided were found a long time ago and took about three minutes to google. The fact the units failed, in any Porsche vehicle, is a failure, which is what was asked. So yeah, you sound like you are trying to defend something when there is nothing to defend. It is what it is. Nothing more, nothing less.
 

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I did my searching, here and on Rennlist and other Porsche forums...
Does anyone have any evidence: data, stories, etc. about PDK failures?
My search suggests it's an almost bullet-proof transmission. Which is probably a good thing, since it's incredibly complicated and costs a fortune to repair,
Some interesting information has appeared about PDK units authored by a Porsche salesman. There are multiple posts you can read this and this along with others. This discussion concerns turbo engines and audi sourced PDK units. The turbo part is relevant as 981.2 and 991.2 are all heading that way.

The TL;DR version: The suggestion was PDK can't handle increased HP over its intended limits for the long term reliability so the power is dialed back to ensuring all is OK. In other words, more power is there but the cars as a whole must be able to use it. Without beefing up the PDK, well you break it, you fix it, and it cost ~$20K. The TTS 50 launch run was brought up but the point is well make that as the flagship car of the company, the overengineering put into that car is not the same as the $50K cars. There is also some points about oil starvation on Caymans where people are trying to drive it in a way not intended (a get what you pay for issue in price points). I think he is making an analogy of, the TT PDK is not the PDK you get so "don't hold your breath" regarding the same level of reliability. Same as the engine you get in a TT is not the engine you get in $50K cars so don't expect it to be a reliable.

Bottom line I see is that Porsche knows exactly what they are doing for reliability providing you stay within their power limitations (turbo engines). Boost them without a corresponding PDK enhancement and in the long term you risk a big bill. This seems relevant to the upcoming sports car facelifts.
 

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Indeed. But most cars when you dial up power and/or torque, you should also make sure that the rest (transmission, suspension and brakes) are able to handle it.

If a transmission (PDK, MT or AT) fails while you drive within the parameter, I expect the company to stand behind it.

If I boost the engine and it fails, then I should take responsibility and do better next time.

Some interesting information has appeared about PDK units authored by a Porsche salesman. There are multiple posts you can read this and this along with others. This discussion concerns turbo engines and audi sourced PDK units. The turbo part is relevant as 981.2 and 991.2 are all heading that way.

The TL;DR version: The suggestion was PDK can't handle increased HP over its intended limits for the long term reliability so the power is dialed back to ensuring all is OK. In other words, more power is there but the cars as a whole must be able to use it. Without beefing up the PDK, well you break it, you fix it, and it cost ~$20K. The TTS 50 launch run was brought up but the point is well make that as the flagship car of the company, the overengineering put into that car is not the same as the $50K cars. There is also some points about oil starvation on Caymans where people are trying to drive it in a way not intended (a get what you pay for issue in price points). I think he is making an analogy of, the TT PDK is not the PDK you get so "don't hold your breath" regarding the same level of reliability. Same as the engine you get in a TT is not the engine you get in $50K cars so don't expect it to be a reliable.

Bottom line I see is that Porsche knows exactly what they are doing for reliability providing you stay within their power limitations (turbo engines). Boost them without a corresponding PDK enhancement and in the long term you risk a big bill. This seems relevant to the upcoming sports car facelifts.
 

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Indeed. But most cars when you dial up power and/or torque, you should also make sure that the rest (transmission, suspension and brakes) are able to handle it.

If a transmission (PDK, MT or AT) fails while you drive within the parameter, I expect the company to stand behind it.

If I boost the engine and it fails, then I should take responsibility and do better next time.
Exactly, and that was exactly what that employee was saying. I believe that is relevant to the upcoming shift to turbos. Crank up the power then you better get a beefed up PDK as well or the unit will not meet the reliability standards of Porsche. I believe some people will rush to try to increase the power without thinking about the effects on the rest of the car.
 
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