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There have been many threads about how (or if) to break in a new 981, and there are claims that only for the USA is there a specified maximum RPM for a set number of miles. I would like to have real data, which means a scan (or cell phone picture) of the relevant page from the owner's manual, getting as many countries as possible (with rough translations of key points as needed).

Although interesting to read, I am not looking for another repository of what someone told you at during the factory tour in Stuggart, or how your uncle Fred has had twelve Porsches over the last 50 years without adding oil because he did (or did not) follow a certain break in procedure, or that Ferry Porsche visited you in a dream and said "Porsches are meant to be driven, not broken in".

Just the facts! It takes a little bit of effort to load in image, but it will be cool to have this break in issue definitively settled.

I will add the first data point, below is the page from my owner's manual for "Cayman, Cayman S, Cayman GTS" for my 2015 GTS picked up in New Hampshire USA, showing thou shall not exceed 4200 RPM for first 2000 miles.

break in usa.jpg

My wife was visiting the mother in law in Germany last week, and she visited the local Porsche dealer. The dealer was nice , said they have similar break in advice despite no hard data of its validity, and will mail me a German edition via the mother in law. I will add the page when (and if) I get it , if someone doesn't post it earlier.
 
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Hello BlueNorther,

This has multiple times been mentioned, shown, proven, documented.
I have seen it in person in Dutch, German and Spanish user manuals.
I incude here a copy from my Spanish user manual (page 122), plus the relevant part of that page in case it is difficult to read.

break in spanish 981.JPG copy page 122.JPG

The relevant part reads (this is my translation, not a sworn one):

Instructions for breaking in
For the breaking in of your new Porsche it is convenient to follow the recommendations mentioned hereafter so as to achieve optimal driving properties. Although the most modern and highly accurate fabrication methods have been used, it is not possible to avoid completely the need for all moving parts to "engage mutually" during the first kilometers of the engine. This process mainly takes place during the first 3,000 kilometers.

Information
For the first 3,000 kim we recommend:
- drive preferably larger distances.
- avoid as much as possible cold starts during short trips.
- do not participate in club sport competitions or in sportive driving courses.
- avoid high RPMs, especially with cold engine.

Nowhere except on this forum from American or Canadese owners or prospective buyers have I seen mention of 4,200 RPMs during break-in.
That "rule" is a creation from Porsche for North America.

All sorts of recommendations have been given for or against this rule.
My own recommendation is:
- variation of driving speeds - this is the most important one
- heat up the engine quickest by normal decent driving until the OIL is at its working tremperature
- don´t lug or overrev the engine. Overrev is a moving target that I would take as 4,000-5,000 initially, increasing during the break in period
- it is important to accelerate hard, at times, because that´s the best way to put load on the piston rings resulting in good breaking in. BUT, accelerating hard does NOT mean overrevving. And there needs to be time between runs in order to let the hot spots cool down.

Also: don´t use Start/Stop during break-in, limit idling as much as possible, if you have PDK use manual mode to control RPMs, don´t forget to also break in brakes and tires, and finally (which probably is one of the reasons the PCNA lawyers have dreamed up the 4,200 RPM limit: do get used to your car before you are trying to find it´s limits.

Ernst
 

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There have been many threads about how (or if) to break in a new 981, and there are claims that only for the USA is there a specified maximum RPM for a set number of miles. I would like to have real data, which means a scan (or cell phone picture) of the relevant page from the owner's manual, getting as many countries as possible (with rough translations of key points as needed).

Although interesting to read, I am not looking for another repository of what someone told you at during the factory tour in Stuggart, or how your uncle Fred has had twelve Porsches over the last 50 years without adding oil because he did (or did not) follow a certain break in procedure, or that Ferry Porsche visited you in a dream and said "Porsches are meant to be driven, not broken in".

Just the facts! It takes a little bit of effort to load in image, but it will be cool to have this break in issue definitively settled.

I will add the first data point, below is the page from my owner's manual for "Cayman, Cayman S, Cayman GTS" for my 2015 GTS picked up in New Hampshire USA, showing thou shall not exceed 4200 RPM for first 2000 miles.

View attachment 55245

My wife was visiting the mother in law in Germany last week, and she visited the local Porsche dealer. The dealer was nice , said they have similar break in advice despite no hard data of its validity, and will mail me a German edition via the mother in law. I will add the page when (and if) I get it , if someone doesn't post it earlier.
See this thread http://www.planet-9.com/981-chat/72234-break-questions-15.html post #293 (April 2013) for AU recommendations. No 4,200 rpm limit mentioned.

:cheers:
 
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Ernest,

Thank you, that is exactly what I am looking for! I wan't to confirm the RPM number is or is not present in the country specific owner's manual.

Your own recommendations make a lot of sense to me, and I am inclined to increase the RPMs stepwise during my break in. I have looked at German forums, someone posted a picture from an older 911 manual that gave specific RPMs increasing over the course of the beak in period, unfortunately I have not been able to find that again. Below is a screen shot of a recent post where members of the German forum argue about break in much like on this forum, but there are no specific references to the official owner's manual, and I haven't been able to find a digital version.

I do remember a recent post from someone in Norway where they mention the 4200 RPM number, so I don't think it is really clear cut that it is only a Porsche of North America issue. That is why I think it will be interesting to get actual screen shots or jpegs of the different owner manuals.

pff.jpg

(Translation: So has it been said to me each time I've picked up a new Porsche: Hold back for the first 1000 km, and if over 4000 RPM, only for a short time.)
 

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Hello BlueNorther,

This has multiple times been mentioned, shown, proven, documented.
I have seen it in person in Dutch, German and Spanish user manuals.
I incude here a copy from my Spanish user manual (page 122), plus the relevant part of that page in case it is difficult to read.

View attachment 55246 View attachment 55247

The relevant part reads (this is my translation, not a sworn one):

Instructions for breaking in
For the breaking in of your new Porsche it is convenient to follow the recommendations mentioned hereafter so as to achieve optimal driving properties. Although the most modern and highly accurate fabrication methods have been used, it is not possible to avoid completely the need for all moving parts to "engage mutually" during the first kilometers of the engine. This process mainly takes place during the first 3,000 kilometers.

Information
For the first 3,000 kim we recommend:
- drive preferably larger distances.
- avoid as much as possible cold starts during short trips.
- do not participate in club sport competitions or in sportive driving courses.
- avoid high RPMs, especially with cold engine.

Nowhere except on this forum from American or Canadese owners or prospective buyers have I seen mention of 4,200 RPMs during break-in.
That "rule" is a creation from Porsche for North America.

All sorts of recommendations have been given for or against this rule.
My own recommendation is:
- variation of driving speeds - this is the most important one
- heat up the engine quickest by normal decent driving until the OIL is at its working tremperature
- don´t lug or overrev the engine. Overrev is a moving target that I would take as 4,000-5,000 initially, increasing during the break in period
- it is important to accelerate hard, at times, because that´s the best way to put load on the piston rings resulting in good breaking in. BUT, accelerating hard does NOT mean overrevving. And there needs to be time between runs in order to let the hot spots cool down.

Also: don´t use Start/Stop during break-in, limit idling as much as possible, if you have PDK use manual mode to control RPMs, don´t forget to also break in brakes and tires, and finally (which probably is one of the reasons the PCNA lawyers have dreamed up the 4,200 RPM limit: do get used to your car before you are trying to find it´s limits.

Ernst
The above is spot on as far as I'm concerned. ps The UK handbook says pretty much the same.
 

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Hi BlueNorther,
Here is a picture taken from the driver's manual which is handed over to Caymans' buyers in the UAE. Interestingly enough, my dealer told me that although the manual says 3,000 km, 1,500 is the recommended mileage by Porsche in the UAE. Main reason to that are the local ambiant temperatures which are always warm (meaning that the engine does not stay cold very long).

image.jpg
 
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Great, thanks 293866 for the picture of UAE manual .

Makes sense about the reducing the break in period for warmer climates. Can't say the same for my location, forecast is for -2 degrees Fahrenheit for my commute tomorrow morning.
 
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Op are you going to compile a summary when all the data is in?
 

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Today I received a German copy of the owners manual for the Cayman GTS sent to me by a German Porsche dealer via my mother in law. I've scanned the relevant page of the break in:

german break in.jpg

(my stilted) translation:

Hints for the break in period:

In order to achieve the optimal running condition for your new Porsche, keep in mind the following tips.
Despite the most modern high precision production methods, it is not possible to completely avoid the need for moving parts to break in. Essentially this occurs during the first 3000 kilometers.

Information
During the first 3000 kilometers you should:
--Favor longer driving distances
--Avoid frequent cold starts with short drives
--Do not take part in club racing or racing classes
--Avoid high RPMs, especially with cold engine
 

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Op are you going to compile a summary when all the data is in?
Based on the limited responses with actual copies of manuals, the world is divided into two parts, "common sense" and "extra cautious / paternalistic" approach. Only in the USA (and I suspect Canada as well per prior threads) is there mention of a specific RPM for break in (keep below 4200 max before 2000 miles).

For me, the obvious take away from this is:

Follow the "common sense" break in recommendations as outlined in the German manual (and most of the world as far as I can tell): in particular let the oil temp get out of the blue range before you increase the RPMs , and break in is finished at 1864 miles (not 2000!) Forget about fixating on 4200 RPMs.
 
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Based on the limited responses with actual copies of manuals, the world is divided into two parts, "common sense" and "extra cautious / paternalistic" approach. Only in the USA (and I suspect Canada as well per prior threads) is there mention of a specific RPM for break in (keep below 4200 max before 2000 miles).

For me, the obvious take away from this is:

Follow the "common sense" break in recommendations as outlined in the German manual (and most of the world as far as I can tell): in particular let the oil temp get out of the blue range before you increase the RPMs , and break in is finished at 1864 miles (not 2000!) Forget about fixating on 4200 RPMs.
Yep. I came to that same conclusion about two years ago and matches verbatim what my ED delivery specialist told me at the factory. However, that doesn't mean that you can keep it up at 7800 rpm for extended periods of time during break-in and heat up the engine components for a long period of time ..... This is the real issue. This is why they don't want you to race it etc for 3000kms. This is also why they verbally tell people not to keep it in sport + mode if you have a pdk.
 

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Based on the limited responses with actual copies of manuals, the world is divided into two parts, "common sense" and "extra cautious / paternalistic" approach. Only in the USA (and I suspect Canada as well per prior threads) is there mention of a specific RPM for break in (keep below 4200 max before 2000 miles).

For me, the obvious take away from this is:

Follow the "common sense" break in recommendations as outlined in the German manual (and most of the world as far as I can tell): in particular let the oil temp get out of the blue range before you increase the RPMs , and break in is finished at 1864 miles (not 2000!) Forget about fixating on 4200 RPMs.
Came to the same conclusion about 10 years ago.
 

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Here's a scanned image of the running-in instructions from the handbook issued with a 981 Boxster bought in the UK.

It's appears to the the same as those submitted from Australia and the UAE and only refers to running-in distance and NOT rpm, other than to "Avoid high engine speeds when the engine is cold".

One obvious difference to the North American version is the conversion of 3000 km running in distance to 2,000 miles as against 1,865 miles for the non N. American version.

 
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