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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read through the forum quite extensively and it appears this is one of the most knowledgable forums I have found, consequently, I am looking for any feedback you may be able to provide....subjective or objective.

These are not all questions, but rather bullet points that are on my mind.
1. Is it too early to buy a Porsche 993 Turbo as an investment.....I haven't really found a source to accurately gauge if they are still depreciating, but 15 years is coming up and that is somewhat of a 'time-line for the beginning of 'collectible'
2. I do not mind having the car as a garage queen.
3. Does the car need to stay pretty much 'stock' for better collectible value ? Do afermarket bolt-ons hurt / help value ?

Just looking to open my mind up a bit to thoughts out there.
Thanks
 

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Cars are not investments. Cars need to do something for you besides make money, because very, very few cars make any money in private hands. A Ferrari Daytona might make some money, but I doubt a 993 would at this point.

I'm no expert, but the early "930" turbos that I have seen have been stock appearing with engine mods. That seems to be the way most folks look at the situation. Mechanicals can be readily reversed (or are not visible to begin with,) whereas cosmetic mods are often a limited appeal.

I'd buy a 993 Turbo to enjoy and expect relatively low depreciation at this point. That would be a lot better financial situation than we've just been through with Caymans (Caymen?)
 

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A fellow on another forum paid 100K from a reputable dealer for a "nearly pristine" 993 Turbo only to find later the car had a salvage title. I believe that reconciliation occurred just short of litigation. Buying cars for "investment" purposes requires experience and knowledge gained over many years combined w/ an excellent prospect for long life. Typically by the time a car has gained enough gravitas to be considered an investment it's already to late to make any money, i.e. Porsche Speedster or 73 911 RS. Low miles, original condition w/ complete matching serial numbers, no non factory modifications, and damage free are generally essential qualities for a "investment grade" Porsche. As in the restaurant business, the best way to end up with a million dollars buying collectible cars is to start w/ ten million. Just ask the guy who paid $1.2M for a '71 356GTS Ferrari Daytona Spyder in 1980, ;)
 

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if anyone knew the sure-fire answer to this question, then we would have that car in our garage!

For a car to be investment grade material then you have to some constants at play all of which would include:

* Very limited numbers of production

* State of the art performance for its day

* Artistic merit

* History

* Expensive when new

* First of its kind in some form or manner.

I personally don't think a 993TT will achieve that mark because it fails on a number of those factors. For one thing, the 993 C4S looks just like it if you stick a whale tail on the C4S (I owned one of these). Another - it was at the end of the model run, not at the beginning. Not much history on a 993TT. Too heavy, not really campaigned in any way. Lots of them made, not especially rare. Performance was very good, but not groundbreaking.

I have a good friend who bought a 1986 Turbo brand new and still has it. The car is perfect, and stock, with 34K miles on it. Its not bringing collectible money either (Current value about $ 30K to $ 35K we estimate), Drive it and its just an old Porsche. Not bad, but dated. And it looks like every other 911 of the era. My 2008 Boxster S will run circles around it. Again, no history to the car - no racing pedigree, etc.

My Porsche Design Edition 2 has 500 copies made worldwide, and only 31 were brought into the USA. But I'm under no illusion it will ever be collectible - its just a nicely optioned Boxster S with a package deal price. Now if Porsche had seen fit to put a 450 HP Turbo in the same car and radically alter the styling, and the raced the car with success - that would change things.

We all know the old collectible cars. But of the newer ones if I was going to look at investment grade I'd be buying a Ford GT from 2005/2006, which has all the criteria except a racing history, or in Porsche world a Carrera GT (which also lacks racing history). A Ferrari Enzo would be on the list as well.

What are the cars that are the buzz right now, that high school or college kids can't get enough of, but can't own? Those will be the cars that bring the money in 30 years when those kids have money to buy the cars of their dreams when they were teens.
 

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If you want an investment 993, find and buy a pristine low mileage 993 Turbo S and keep it in that condition as a garage queen (i.e., very minimal usage).

A regular 993TT is too common to be a collectible in the near term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the comments, opened my eyes a bit !



I have been watching Barrett-Jackson Auto Auction here in the US and
see many cars go thru for some pretty high $$$'s......many Corvettes, Cameros, Shelbys etc. Many of the cars honestly do not seem like they should be 'investment quality vehicles ! On the other hand, they were the HOT cars when I was younger....but i don't think they were extremely limited editions by any means (maybe I 'm not paying attention to the 'specifics' of these cars being auctioned ?)

I was considering a 1996 or 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo of which I think there were less than 1800 made worldwide (can't find the link for that stat) and that seems relatively limited.

Thanks for the feedback....I will continue my due diligence and focus on lower milage cars.

Regarding salvage title on the $100k Porsche.....the seller was clearly BOGUS. Maybe the laws on that disclosure varies, but that seems like pretty standard information that should be mandatorily disclosed !
 

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Racing heritage may have mattered in the generation of cars produced in the 50s and 60s, but the changing nature of racing over the past thirty years means it will have much less impact than other factors.

There is very little attention to stock manufacture racing series. The production Ferraris, Cobras, and Vettes from the 60s that were basically race cars that were commercially available just don't exist any more. The modern equivalents are boutique production cars that are already so outrageously expensive, they will likely never reach their retail price.

A 993TT has about as good a chance as any car to have some collector value. THe key is that there is some demographic that places a value on the car that exceeds similar products. "The last of the air cooled Porsches" wil certainly be a factor, and the 993TT was a somewhat rare, top of the line model of what is otherwise a huge production run (collector speaking.)

The big challenge with 80s and early 90s cars is that they are made of materials that age badly, and look both outdated and chintzy when compared with either modern or even older cars.

I think the right example of a Ferrari Testarossa could turn a profit -- they sell at a huge range, though, and car selection is huge. Plus the cost of maintenance for this era of Ferraris will likely erode any profit margin unless the car is not driven at all.
 

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My Cayman has proven to be an incredible investment. I seriously considered a mistress, a heroin addiction, and real estate as alternatives.

I think I made the right choice.
 
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