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I've always wondered about sports cars and their balance between trying to achieve something light, yet durable enough to endure the stresses of the track. Is there point at which you compromise strength for something lightweight which could effect the long term durability of the car. Where is the cayman in the balance? Is there a preference toward strength, durability and added weight or more towards something lightweight with weaker parts?
 

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Lightness does not always equate to "weaker". Sometimes it's a materials choice (steel versus aluminum, magnesium, or carbon fiber) or manufacturing technology (hydroforming, forging, etc.). I'm sure it's not always true, but lighter at the same or greater strength seems to usually mean more expensive.

The Cayman seems to be moderately aggressive in weight reduction, for a production car. Some aluminum body panels, aluminum engine and transaxle, some aluminum suspension components, some super-strong steel, etc. It could go farther, using things like lighter wheels, carbon fiber body panels, lighter seats as standard, a lighter exhaust system, etc. There are probably opportunities for more high strength steel and magnesium use. I doubt any of these ideas would reduce strength.
 

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Lightness does not always equate to "weaker". Sometimes it's a materials choice (steel versus aluminum, magnesium, or carbon fiber) or manufacturing technology (hydroforming, forging, etc.). I'm sure it's not always true, but lighter at the same or greater strength seems to usually mean more expensive.

The Cayman seems to be moderately aggressive in weight reduction, for a production car. Some aluminum body panels, aluminum engine and transaxle, some aluminum suspension components, some super-strong steel, etc. It could go farther, using things like lighter wheels, carbon fiber body panels, lighter seats as standard, a lighter exhaust system, etc. There are probably opportunities for more high strength steel and magnesium use. I doubt any of these ideas would reduce strength.
+1 you can probaly lift an F1 monocoque cockpit alone but it sure is extremely sturdy. just a question of materials and design.
 

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+1 you can probaly lift an F1 monocoque cockpit alone but it sure is extremely sturdy. just a question of materials, design and cost.
Fixed it for you. :) :)

Seriously, though, reducing weight while maintaining strength is certainly possible, it just costs more. A lot more. Cost is another thing to balance along with weight, strength and durability. For a production car, cost and durability rise towards the top, for an F1 car, weight and strength are more important.

Some famous race engineer (Norbert Singer?) once said that if a part doesn't break once and a while, it's too heavy. Not something you want in a street car...
 
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