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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't yet figure out what it takes for the oil level readout to provide information, rather than telling me "no information available" or something like that. Yes--I know the car must be level. Yes, I know the ignition must be on. Beyond that, as soon as I think I'm on to how it works I'm proven wrong.

Help, anybody? Thanks in advance.
 

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all hood and doors must be closed.. and you must have a certain temp on the oil for it to read.. i think it has to bee 100 at least.. so when we oil change.. we idle for about 8 min.. and we get a reading at that point...plug in the durametric and reset the oil change reminder..

Lemon
 

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Instead of the cute graphic, why couldn't it just say "You are 117 milliliters low"?

all hood and doors must be closed.. and you must have a certain temp on the oil for it to read.. i think it has to bee 100 at least..
At what barometric pressure may you check the oil, and is there a correction factor for degrees of latitude?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
all hood and doors must be closed.. and you must have a certain temp on the oil for it to read.. i think it has to bee 100 at least.. so when we oil change.. we idle for about 8 min.. and we get a reading at that point...plug in the durametric and reset the oil change reminder..
Thank you, Lemon. Can the level be read with the engine shut off but the ignition on, or does it read with the engine running? And the 8 minutes . . . is that how long it takes to typically get to a temp at which oil level can be read?

What's with the hood and doors closed--what sense does that make if all we want to do is read oil level? Ah for the old days when there was a dipstick and none of this nonsense had to be dealt with! Anybody have a clue why they made this unfortunate change?
 

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Mine's a bit fussy too. Once in a while it refuses to give a reading, under the same conditions as it has before and after. I just let it be cranky and wait for it to regain composure. :hilarious:
 

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Thank you, Lemon. Can the level be read with the engine shut off but the ignition on, or does it read with the engine running? And the 8 minutes . . . is that how long it takes to typically get to a temp at which oil level can be read?
Read the manual - the oil level is checked when the engine is off (and ignition is on) - for same reason as when you used a dipstick - the oil has to be drained into the pan where the sensor is.
A Porsche service tech demonstrated to me that the oil level display (in the MFD) is disabled until the oil temp is up to "operating temp"; which is 185. Go drive your car around and see how long it takes to get up to 185. That time will vary, dependent on how you're driving and ambient temp, etc. In my car, just driving around town at 30 mph in 60 ambient, it takes 15 - 20 minutes to reach 185.
 
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Perhaps we should go back 2 steps from the electronic oil level measuring. Forget the dip stick, simply count the number of empty quart containers. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 = Full. :)

But seriously, the lack of info when needed can be frustrating. So, my procedure is to add 7 quarts, then drive around, and top off as necessary.
 
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I thought the hood needed to be closed the whole time to make sure that no oil has just been added and still making its way to the pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Mine's a bit fussy too. Once in a while it refuses to give a reading, under the same conditions as it has before and after. I just let it be cranky and wait for it to regain composure. :hilarious:
Me, too.

From the kind response of posters here, I think we have it figured out. Mostly, it won't read because we haven't reached high enough oil temp (which is stupid, because the old dipstick always worked adequately, regardless of whether the engine was hot or cold, but it is what it is).

But . . . there is another potential factor that, till now, had been confusing me. Once in a while, while I'm out driving, I CAN get a read. (Usually, I can't, of course, because the engine is running.) The following is what must be happening . . .

Once in a while I do not turn the start/stop function off. Presumably, I'm out for a drive but still getting a good read, I must be sitting at a red light, and start/stop has shut the engine off. In that moment before the engine turns back on, the computer will allow a read if the oil is hot. This has got to be the explanation--I just hadn't been tracking that the read does come on when out driving during moments where the start/stop function has shut the engine off. It has seemed so very sporadic because, like most of you, I don't allow the start/stop function very often. ('Comes in handy when the gate comes down and the freight train is passing, or when the drawbridge goes up, for example.)

Mystery solved: hot engine, lids and doors shut, ignition on, engine off.

Thanks, guys!
 

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Me, too.

Mostly, it won't read because we haven't reached high enough oil temp (which is stupid, because the old dipstick always worked adequately, regardless of whether the engine was hot or cold, but it is what it is).
Wrong. Doing a little research, I found this; "Consult your owner’s manual to see whether the manufacturer recommends checking the oil when the engine is cold or when the engine is warm. Check the oil before starting the car if the manufacturer recommends a cold engine. Check the oil after you have been driving the car if the manufacturer recommends a warm engine."
The reason why mfrs specify a temp at which oil level is to be checked is because, like most liquids, oil expands/contracts with changes in temp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wrong. Doing a little research, I found this; "Consult your owner’s manual to see whether the manufacturer recommends checking the oil when the engine is cold or when the engine is warm. Check the oil before starting the car if the manufacturer recommends a cold engine. Check the oil after you have been driving the car if the manufacturer recommends a warm engine."
The reason why mfrs specify a temp at which oil level is to be checked is because, like most liquids, oil expands/contracts with changes in temp.
I understand they tell you that. In contrast, I can tell you that when working on cars long ago (1960s), using the low and high points on the dipstick never cause any problem whatsoever regardless of what the manufacturer said or what the temperature was. We worked on domestic and European cars of all sorts. 'Never once ran dry. 'Never once blew a seal. I maintain that this nitpicking is overstated and unnecessary. Precision is not required with oil levels. Ballpark is.
 

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Thank you, Lemon. Can the level be read with the engine shut off but the ignition on, or does it read with the engine running? And the 8 minutes . . . is that how long it takes to typically get to a temp at which oil level can be read?

What's with the hood and doors closed--what sense does that make if all we want to do is read oil level? Ah for the old days when there was a dipstick and none of this nonsense had to be dealt with! Anybody have a clue why they made this unfortunate change?


well we know it has to be on level ground.. this is not your usual dealer nor manuals step by step.. it just works for us.

Belive me i wish this car had a dipstick.. it would be a lot easier..

lemon
 

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Belive me i wish this car had a dipstick.. it would be a lot easier.. lemon
Getting out of the car, unlatching the hood (and getting your fingers dirty), pulling the dipstick out (getting fingers dirty, again), and hoping that you have a paper towel; because you can't read the stick without first wiping it off... That's EASIER than reading a display without even having to get out of the car? Is checking all four tires with a pressure gauge also easier than reading a display in the car? :hilarious:
 

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The current system is a pain because I can't get a reading when I want one. A dipstick was better for that.
 

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The current system is a pain because I can't get a reading when I want one. A dipstick was better for that.
I understood that before I wrote the above...you have to wait for the engine to be warmed up. Is that a life-threatening situation?? Nope. Is it worth bitching about?? Not to me. I found out today my that my dental insurance won't cover me while I'm in CA - now THAT is something I got concerned about.
While working part-time during college, a supervisor had a slogan that went along with his more disliked assignments; "Life is a bitch; then you die."
 
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I understood that before I wrote the above...you have to wait for the engine to be warmed up. Is that a life-threatening situation?? Nope. Is it worth bitching about?? Not to me. I found out today my that my dental insurance won't cover me while I'm in CA - now THAT is something I got concerned about.
While working part-time during college, a supervisor had a slogan that went along with his more disliked assignments; "Life is a bitch; then you die."
I believe that machines should serve us, not the other way around. I want to be able the check and add oil before I leave the house. The refusal to give me any reading feels to me like I am being made to bow to the machine. Even my 986 would let me get a level within a few minutes. Life is enough of a bitch without programmers making it worse, as has been done here. But I'm glad it doesn't bother you.
 
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I believe that machines should serve us, not the other way around. I want to be able the check and add oil before I leave the house. The refusal to give me any reading feels to me like I am being made to bow to the machine. Even my 986 would let me get a level within a few minutes. Life is enough of a bitch without programmers making it worse, as has been done here. But I'm glad it doesn't bother you.
Life ain't perfect, and it's obviously impossible for car designers/engineers to satisfy the whims of every customer. If I used your "machines should serve us" rationale for every mechanical or electrical device I own...the list of my perceived imperfections would be lengthy! :hilarious:
And there's a simple solution to your problem; check the oil upon your return to the house. (Or any time after it's up to temp; and you won't even have to get your hands dirty!) I got bigger fish to fry than this. :cheers:
 
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Ok, I don't want this discussion morph into dry sump vs integrated dry sump which is not dry sump thingy. The car has integrated dry sump which is a familiar oil pan below the crank and counter shafts, but, separated from them (except in the middle where there's a hole) by horizontal casting. The oil pump sucks out of the pan and supplies the engine directly from there and there is no external tank.

However, the system basically is the poor man dry sump system so you need to have the oil warm to get the correct reading
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Getting out of the car, unlatching the hood (and getting your fingers dirty), pulling the dipstick out (getting fingers dirty, again), and hoping that you have a paper towel; because you can't read the stick without first wiping it off... That's EASIER than reading a display without even having to get out of the car? Is checking all four tires with a pressure gauge also easier than reading a display in the car?
Damned right it's easier! It ALWAYS works perfectly regardless of temperature or doors being opened or shut. It also works 100% of the time. Also, there's nothing to break or give incorrect feedback (if on a level surface, which remains important, of course). Moreover, the most important time to check the oil is before starting to drive--not when it's too late. You can't do that with Porsche's fancy electronic gadgetry that requires a hot engine. NOTHING beats a dipstick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I believe that machines should serve us, not the other way around. I want to be able the check and add oil before I leave the house. The refusal to give me any reading feels to me like I am being made to bow to the machine. Even my 986 would let me get a level within a few minutes. Life is enough of a bitch without programmers making it worse, as has been done here. But I'm glad it doesn't bother you.
Absolutely! The question remains, why did Porsche make this change? Are people really so incredibly lazy that checking the dipstick is too much effort (despite all the weird concomitant effort now required to know when and how to get a read from the electronic gadget they've replaced the dipstick with)? It's hard for me to believe that the dipstick cost more money than the complex junk they've replaced it with.
 
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