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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello All,

Thinking of tracking my car in a DE event in the coming months so I priced PAGID pads and was surprised at their cost.

Here's my question: Does it make sense to buy used pads (like I see for sale on this site)?

I'm all about saving money, but buying used brake pads seems like buying used tires....they better be close to new and a heck of a deal.

The prices I've seen listed do not seem like a deal to me, forgetting about the question of actually using used brake pads.

Thank you.

Eddie
 

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Hello All,

Thinking of tracking my car in a DE event in the coming months so I priced PAGID pads and was surprised at their cost.

Here's my question: Doe sit make sense to buy used pads (like I see for sale on this site)?

I'm all about saving money, but buying used brake pads seems like buying used tires....they better be close to new and a heck of a deal.

The prices I've seen listed do not seem like a deal to me, forgetting about the question of actually using used brake pads.

Thank you.

Eddie
Pads need to bed into the rotors. If either your disks are heavily grooved or if the prior owner's disks were heavily grooved (which can happen to brakes used extensively on the track) I'd think the pads would be useless to you.

I suppose on two cars with nearly new disks it would be conceivable but usually, in my opinion, the tracks not the best place to experiment with this sort of thing. I think your stock brakes will hold up fine as would street tires if you are new to tracking a car.
 

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Hi Eddie

From your post, I am not sure whether you're just going to do the odd isolated DE event or whether you plan to attend regular DE events in the future.

Like Bryant has already stated, if you're new to the track, the stock setup would do just fine, just make sure you have plenty mileage left in your existing pads and rotors, and unless the brake fluid is relatively fresh, then I'd spend the money on a brake flush instead of the second hand pagids.

Standard pad wear can be quite rapid depending on the track layout and driving style, keep an eye them and you'll be o.k.

If your not new to the track, and you're wishing to persue upgrades to the braking system, then like Bryant says above, pads and rotors are at their best when mated together, once you depart from that ethos you can never really be sure where you'll wind up - not for me!

If you're new, try out the standard setup first, your Instructer will be able to advise you on the best way forward once he's spent time out on the track with you.

Good luck and enjoy.
Rob
:cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for everyone's replies.

This will be my first track time with my Cayman.

You both bring up good points. I will stay with stock for now and go with new pads should I become a DE addict.

Thanks again,

Eddie
 

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I'm not a huge fan of purchasing someone elses used pads especially if they have seen a few track events. Something to consider after your first time out would be switching you stock pads to Cool Carbon's street/track pads. They are reletively inexpensive compared to full blown track pads and will do an excellent job at the track for beginners. I loved mine and used them for my first two seasons out before needing something better. They also work great on the street so you don't need to do pad swaps between the street and track plus they put out very little brake dust. I like them so much that I will now be using them as my street pads because I'm tired of cleaning my rims every week plus I drive pretty agressively on the street.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks for your reply RV4Flyer. Those pads might just what the doctor ordered as I'm a track neophyte and the idea of swapping pads for a few tracks days per year does not appeal to me.


Eddie



P.S. A DE instructor did say my stock pads would be fine for the first few DE's. My OP was intended to be forward looking.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of purchasing someone elses used pads especially if they have seen a few track events. Something to consider after your first time out would be switching you stock pads to Cool Carbon's street/track pads. They are reletively inexpensive compared to full blown track pads and will do an excellent job at the track for beginners. I loved mine and used them for my first two seasons out before needing something better. They also work great on the street so you don't need to do pad swaps between the street and track plus they put out very little brake dust. I like them so much that I will now be using them as my street pads because I'm tired of cleaning my rims every week plus I drive pretty agressively on the street.
Wow! Have Cool Carbons changed or something? The ones I had were painted blue in color and were super-hard. I had them for a '95 M3 in the late '90s. Whenever I got grooves starting on my rotors, I'd use the Cool Carbons for a while to clean them up. They were like grinding the rotors! I loved them on a hot track day, but they squealed like a pig on the road and ate the rotors if they weren't hot. Never heard of anyone using them on the street before.

There are situations where people go out and buy pads and then use them once for their first school, don't get it or like it and then have almost new pads used on their almost new rotors. In that case, I'd pay half price for a set.

If you do end up doing the musical rotors thing like me, here's a few best practice things you can do that are really easy:

1. Mark the position of each pad on the car. Fronts and rears are obvious because fronts are bigger, but mark L or R and I or O, for "inside" or "outside". Use a metal scribe or edge of a screwdriver to etch it into the back of the pads on a corner that won't see any wear from the brake cylinders. This way, after you bed your pads in and use them, the contour of each pad will match the contour of each rotor surface. Subsequent beddings in will be quite quick and easy.

2. If you are monitoring your pad thicknesses and changing a lot, the brake sensors that plug into the pads can be pulled out and tied back behind the brakes in a way that will not rub on the rims of your wheels. Porsche puts 4 brake wear sensors on their cars. Most just have 2 at diagonals. If you think you might need one, just use one and tie the rest back. Porsche has the easiest brake design for changing pads. It takes longer to deal with the sensors than the pads once you get the rhythm of it. (for the record, this is "unsafe" and I'm not "recommending" any one do anything except at their own risk etc etc. I haven't used a brake sensor on a pad since my first pad change. No issues.

3. Get a "clicker" torque wrench. I like the ⅜" size with a 6" extension. You can buy one at Sears Hardware and a lot of other places. The real cheap ones from Harbor Freight are junk and I don't recommend them. I do like their aluminum floor jack and aluminum jack stands though. Here's the deal with torque wrenches: You want all the wheels to be about the same tightness. If you use a torque wrench with even 10% accuracy, so long as you use the same one on all the wheel bolts, you'll get the same torque around the wheel. Uneven torque or too much torque can warp rotors when the brakes get real hot.

4. I'm sure, if you're new to the track, your instructor will tell you this or the classroom instructor. DON'T put your parking brake on when your car has been driven hard on the track (or even on canyon roads where you've used your brakes heavily). When the brakes are really hot, the parking brake sticks to one part of the brake, absorbs heat unevenly and will warp your rotors. It will also weld itself to the metal side of the brakes. Just shut off the car and put it in 1st Gear or Reverse or whatever the PDK things do.

5. Fresh brake fluid is really important. If there's moisture in the fluid, it will boil. If it boils, that's STEAM. Steam is a COMPRESSIBLE GAS. That's not good for a hydraulic system like a brake system. If you find yourself out on the track, mashing the brakes from 100+ and the brake pedal goes to the floor, pump the brakes immediately and keep pumping until you get some braking. Barely make it through Turn 1, then go slow and come in.... Then change your underwear and get some fresh fluid. ...or you could just remember to have the fluid changed before each track weekend.

:cheers:
 

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... Porsche has the easiest brake design for changing pads.
Actually, Porsche "had" the easiest brake design for changing pads. The 981 (and 991) no longer uses the long time standard open top caliper design in the front, necessitating caliper removal to change pads. It's no longer a 60 second pad change for those newer models.

A point to note is that most DE sponsoring organizations require at least 50% brake pad material to pass tech inspection. Below that and the risk of brake fade and/or wearing out your pads on track increases greatly. So buying used track pads that are 25% worn is really more like buying pads that only have about 50% useful life remaining. Critical brake system components are just not a smart place to try to save a few bucks, IMHO.
 

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Actually, Porsche "had" the easiest brake design for changing pads. The 981 (and 991) no longer uses the long time standard open top caliper design in the front, necessitating caliper removal to change pads. It's no longer a 60 second pad change for those newer models.

A point to note is that most DE sponsoring organizations require at least 50% brake pad material to pass tech inspection. Below that and the risk of brake fade and/or wearing out your pads on track increases greatly. So buying used track pads that are 25% worn is really more like buying pads that only have about 50% useful life remaining. Critical brake system components are just not a smart place to try to save a few bucks, IMHO.
Dan:

I did not know that!

Thanks for this info. My 981 lust has diminished considerably with the gathering of this new knowledge. I'm thinking more in terms of 987.2 now and those new-motor Gen1s are looking better. Actually, MY car is looking better!

It always puzzles me when a car company gets something so right for so long and then "fixes" it. 981's have so many great improvements. Sad they're also going backwards.

Oh...An additional reason why you need 50% pad material is HEAT. The pad material is a pretty good heat insulator and there's less chance of boiling fluid when you have a lot of pad left. Less of the heat gets to the cylinders and fluid when pads are thick.

As far as buying used... In general theory, I agree with you. However, it takes quite a few track days to use up 25% of a set of Pagid Yellows. Especially for Novice drivers. I'd think the value of used pads would depend on the pad, the thickness of the pad etc. Easy to say they're not worth anything if you run only a few times each year, but this gets to be a major expense if you're burning through a lot of pads and tires and track fees.

The bedding in must be done very carefully and extra long on used pads so you don't burn the pad material before the surfaces of the pads and rotors match up. This has to be done on the street, not at track speeds. I did it all the time before I got wise to the "marking the position on the back of each pad" trick because my race pads would be randomized every time I put them back on. I have made a lot of mistakes in 30 years of track days.

I know some every-weekend track-junkies who buy used tires, used pads, used anything they can find to keep the cost down. Some of these guys would buy used gas if they could find it. They are experienced drivers with all the trackside tools needed to change pads and tires. If they're not racing gutted sedans with room in the back, they're pulling tire trailers or hauling their cars in on a trailer with a ragged tow vehicle. When you drive every weekend, the costs add up and you find ways...

:cheers:
 

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Seems like I'm the lone wolf on this one. Buying used pads is no problem whatsoever. I know because I've done it many times. Not only that, I frequently change pads inside-out or to the other caliper. I even change pad material (Pagid Yellow to PFC 08 or 06 and back).

It's true that there will initially be a pad-rotor mismatch and decreased braking force. However, this is minimal and not even noticeable. If you're going relatively fast, i.e. not a newb, then all it takes is a few hard braking zones and they will match up nicely. Takes less than 1 lap to have them conform.

I also run pads down very thin, but that's not recommended unless you're going to check pad thickness after EVERY session.

It's understandable why organizations (e.g. PCA) require 50% thickness at morning grid techs since most people don't look at pads all weekend. They just "set it and forget it". And it'd be a real danger if someone ran out of pads because they weren't paying attention closely. For someone like me who checks pads all the time, however, it's just annoying. :D What may not pass grid tech I can get almost a weekend out of. And, no, I haven't boiled any fluids because pad material was too thin... Well over 80 days of DE in advanced/instructor groups.

p.s. Agree with others that you don't necessarily need racing pads when you're just starting out. But you'll need them soon if you start picking up speed.
 

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Seems like I'm the lone wolf on this one. Buying used pads is no problem whatsoever. I know because I've done it many times. Not only that, I frequently change pads inside-out or to the other caliper. I even change pad material (Pagid Yellow to PFC 08 or 06 and back).

It's true that there will initially be a pad-rotor mismatch and decreased braking force. However, this is minimal and not even noticeable. If you're going relatively fast, i.e. not a newb, then all it takes is a few hard braking zones and they will match up nicely. Takes less than 1 lap to have them conform.

I also run pads down very thin, but that's not recommended unless you're going to check pad thickness after EVERY session.

It's understandable why organizations (e.g. PCA) require 50% thickness at morning grid techs since most people don't look at pads all weekend. They just "set it and forget it". And it'd be a real danger if someone ran out of pads because they weren't paying attention closely. For someone like me who checks pads all the time, however, it's just annoying. :D What may not pass grid tech I can get almost a weekend out of. And, no, I haven't boiled any fluids because pad material was too thin... Well over 80 days of DE in advanced/instructor groups.

p.s. Agree with others that you don't necessarily need racing pads when you're just starting out. But you'll need them soon if you start picking up speed.
Vet:

I wouldn't call you a Lone Wolf...I've done most of the things you're doing too.

Which brake fluid do you run? SRF? Which tracks?

Are you saying you remove your wheels and check the front and back pad thickness after each run? No way I'm up for that until I get a pit crew!

I would surmise that you would have some trouble with stock pads running so thin, especially with anything but very high boiling point fluid. I see you're running PFC and Yellows. Different kettle of fish there. Imagine the guy with Super Blue and stock pads who thinks he's all set. His pads are down to ¼. This is why there's a rule.

Try marking your pads for position and putting them back where they were. It really helps! I did it your way for years and had variable results. Marking the pads really made a nice improvement for me. They're pretty much instantly bed in when you do this. Worth the small amount of extra care, especially when you're trying to maximize pad life.

I went from stock ATE BMW street pads to Pagid Orange without cleaning the rotors on an M3 and got massive vibrations after the brakes heated up. When I came back in, and inspected, there were spots and streaks of black goo on the surface of the rotors. This happened repeatedly with Pagid Orange. I started asking around and found that people were cleaning their rotors when they changed pad compounds. Also heard about Windex working as well as Brake Kleen for this. I carry windex to the track anyway for getting bugs off the windshield and have it home in the garage, so it was pretty simple for me. When I started cleaning rotors during the pad changing process, the problem went away. If your pad changes haven't ever resulted in something like this happening, consider yourself a lucky chooser of pad compounds.

Also found out during this period that brand new rotors can cause problems if you don't clean them before you use them. Some rotors even come with a little note in the box about it...not that I read such things back then. Rotors come with rust preventative sprayed on them and it can react with some pad compounds and make a similar mess to the changing pad compound thing. It's just good practice to clean them before changing. The first time I cleaned a set of brand new out of the box rotors with Windex, I could not believe the amount of crud on my rag. You couldn't see this stuff on the rotor, but it sure showed up on a clean paper towel.

It's true that some pad compounds will mix with some other pad compounds, but I can tell you, when they don't mix, it isn't good and it's very difficult to get rid of.

Just knowing that this can be the source of a problem is good in case it happens to you. Helps you solve it quicker. I wasted several good track weekends and bought a set of expensive and unnecessary 2-piece rotors for my car, fooling around with this blindly. If I'd have known that this pad mixing was a likely cause to my problems, I could have solved it much quicker and cheaper.

Another thing that's happened to me is that I ran pads too hard before they were bedded in. What happens is that you get hot spots on the pad and the rotor that do all the braking while other parts don't touch. It's even worse with new pads and used rotors because the pad compound needs to get hot and gas off the stuff they use to hold the compound together. If you work the brakes hard enough and they're uneven enough to each other, they'll glaze the pads, sometimes bad enough to ruin them. I had to throw way a set of new front pads once. Revived some others with an abrasive grinder in the garage at home by taking off the glaze. I've also lunched a set of new front rotors doing this. One session on new rotors and they were warped with blue streaks on the surfaces where they had got way too hot where the other surfaces were cool. The uneven heat did it, I think.


I also have personally experienced new pads "gassing" and just not hooking up with rotors when you get them too hot too soon. You lose braking like you do when fluid boils except that the pedal is still firm. As I recall, it was slightly terrifying. I was a nonbeliever of all these theories and had to test them all myself. I survived all of them but all these things can really happen.

If you run hard with very thin pads a lot, expect more problems with your calipers than the average track-rat. You're putting more heat to them more often and that can't be great for the seals. I have no direct experience here. I error on the side of caution nowadays admittedly, but this just makes good sense to me.

I'm a believer in using "best practices" and sticking to them. It's good to test the boundaries one at a time sometimes so you know what does what, but a slap-dash attitude about these things can ruin your day. (Not speaking to you specifically. I don't know you or your attitudes.)

Not saying that every used set of track pads is worthless. If they have more than half left, they're good to use for an advanced tracker. There are some bargains out there if you know how to manage your brakes.

For me, the more time I spend with the car on the jack, the less prepped I am for good driving and teaching. I try to prep the car for the whole event if I can...maybe I'll need to change the wheels around to even out tire wear, although so far with the CS and my camber settings, tire wear is pretty good and pretty even for me.

I'm saying this stuff because I've personally done it wrong and had many weekends thwarted by unnecessary technical problems. If you want to spend your day under the car, that's cool with me. I want to drive, teach, kick some tires and have fun.

Luckily, most of this was at Putnam Park in Indiana 10 or more years ago at lapping days, some on weekdays with very few cars. Putnam is a track with great run-off on almost all the turns. My off-track adventures were not too bad. The worst damage I suffered was the loss of a pair of fog lights due to tall grass once. I replaced them with home-made brake ducts that helped cool the front brakes a little better.

Also agree that novice drivers can run a track weekend or two on stock brakes without issues. In fact, advanced drivers can use them if too but they need to change pads an rotors often and there will be a ton of dust. Because they seem to create more heat than track pads, the pad thickness thing is more of an issue too.

In 2010 or so, Porsche sent a guy around to different track events one year with a stock Gen 2 CS. This middle aged driver was really fast and smooth, gave rides and claimed that the car was completely stock. He would run laps most of the day through most of the sessions....more run time than any of us...on stock pads....But I'm sure he got new pads and maybe new rotors for each event.

Stock pads on German cars are made for hauling the car down from Autobahn speeds in a hurry without trouble. Unlike other some other countries, Germany has roads with no speed limits and a lot of Alps etc. They have some strict TUV requirements on their brake performance that exceed ours and Japan's. As a result, stock Porsche and other German brand brakes are pretty good! In order for these pads to handle this heat and also not squeal and work well when it's cold out too, they have to give up something. That something is black dust and a bit higher wear rates, especially when they are pushed hard.

I'm using some ceramic pads made by Hawk on the street on my CS. These are sort of similar to the stock brakes on a lot of Japanese cars. There are others by Akebono and maybe one or two other brands. They don't make black dust. They are great in the city and in winter driving, but I would never ever run them at the track. They just don't work well for that. I did one school at R/A one year with a high of 50 degrees....not "in the 50's", a HIGH of 50 and it felt colder because of the wind. Before I went to this one, I changed from my ceramics to my stock Porsche Textar brakes (Windexed the rotors too!) and they predictably worked great. When I go to normal track days, I'm on Pagid Yellow. They'll hold up to almost anything for a very long time.

I've heard some good and bad about PFC. Would love to get feedback on how they work with Gen 1 Cayman S.

:cheers:
 
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Vet:

I wouldn't call you a Lone Wolf...
That's some really good experience to hear from you and the_vetman, it had honestly never occurred to me.

Before switching to racing shifter karts when I was a heavy HPDE addict I used Hawk Blues (this was in the late 90s) for the track. When I took my Cayman to the track last year (nearly 15 years after having last driven a street car at speed on a track) it was bone stock except for track tires and steel braided brake lines. I was really uncomfortable with the bite of the stock pads. I had always been envious of Porsche brakes when driving my car in the 90s (I had an FD3S Mazda RX-7 R1) so I just wanted to see how the stock set up held up.

I'm trying to keep my Cayman from going over the slippery slope into become a track car but the this feedback on used brakes was a good one, because I'm used to pretty ridiculous braking in a shifter kart (Imagine braking at the 1.5 marker off the longest straight and you'll get the idea).

I'm going to get the GT3 master cylinder installed before I go to the track again (there's that slippery slope), I mainly just like giving friends and family rides around the track which I can't do in a kart, but maybe I'll throw in some used pads to get that bite I've missed. I'd guess there's 0.5 seconds or more in some of the braking zones if I had the confidence to really hold off on opening the parachute (my little visual for out braking people, who's gonna pull the parachute cord first).
 

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That's some really good experience to hear from you and the_vetman, it had honestly never occurred to me.

Before switching to racing shifter karts when I was a heavy HPDE addict I used Hawk Blues (this was in the late 90s) for the track. When I took my Cayman to the track last year (nearly 15 years after having last driven a street car at speed on a track) it was bone stock except for track tires and steel braided brake lines. I was really uncomfortable with the bite of the stock pads. I had always been envious of Porsche brakes when driving my car in the 90s (I had an FD3S Mazda RX-7 R1) so I just wanted to see how the stock set up held up.

I'm trying to keep my Cayman from going over the slippery slope into become a track car but the this feedback on used brakes was a good one, because I'm used to pretty ridiculous braking in a shifter kart (Imagine braking at the 1.5 marker off the longest straight and you'll get the idea).

I'm going to get the GT3 master cylinder installed before I go to the track again (there's that slippery slope), I mainly just like giving friends and family rides around the track which I can't do in a kart, but maybe I'll throw in some used pads to get that bite I've missed. I'd guess there's 0.5 seconds or more in some of the braking zones if I had the confidence to really hold off on opening the parachute (my little visual for out braking people, who's gonna pull the parachute cord first).
Bryant:-

I live in the U.K, and like you I used to race Shifter karts, (and motorcycles a few years before that), those things have massive abilities on the track, a real adrenaline rush, and yes, immense braking capabilities.

If I am honest, I found that the braking performance was the thing that I missed the most when I starting doing Trackdays years later, I am over it now - just so long as I never get back in a Shifter kart!

Rob
:cheers:
 

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If I am honest, I found that the braking performance was the thing that I missed the most when I starting doing Trackdays years later, I am over it now - just so long as I never get back in a Shifter kart!
I have a son turning 8 this year so I'm going to be solidly in the karting scene for a while, it was sort of fun doing a driver's event again. I had thought of writing up my experience but since most people here are driving their Porsches I thought the karting side would sort of be lost on people (and therefore not particularly interesting)

I'll summarize a few things here.
1. The first moment I turned my Cayman on the track I nearly broke outloud laughing due to all the body roll of the stock suspension. I mean it was fine once I got used to it, and really I had zero complaints about the Cayman on the track given it was a street car with a street suspension, but it was a bit of 'are you kidding me?' at first.
2. Cars are really slow. I was sort of afraid that after 15 years of driving on the smaller shorter kart tracks that speeds of 120+ might be scary for me. In reality, my impression was wow, there is like zero chance I am going to lose control of this thing, everything is happening so slow, my one area of wimpiness was definitely the braking where I just wasn't sure if the car would stop so I was a wuss there for sure. Virtually all the mods I'll do to my car will be around getting confidence inspiring brakes.
3. It's a lot different not racing people. In a race the cars have nearly identical performance envelopes. You can really see a better driver inch away from you, or note a driver similar to you that is weak through a certain section where you might pass. In the HPDEs the cars are all over the place. You'll get passed by Corvette on the straight, then catch them under braking and realize he can't keep up with you all around the track, just on the straight stuff. In all the entire rhythm is just so much different than racing, I basically tried giving people tons of space because I had little confidence that I could run the type of close quarters I'd normally run during a race and clearly it wouldn't be appreciated.
4. I think it's a little crazy driving a street car on the track. Normally in racing safety intrudes in nearly every aspect of the car, your equipment, etc. I kept thinking, wow I love this car, there is no way I'm going to drive this car like my kart and risk losing it. Karts spin out and stop in 10-15 feet. Cars can careen and cover serious ground when you lose it, I personally feel like I can out drive the safety equipment on a street car and that made me think I should pick up a spec Miata or spec Boxster for these track days. I do love the look of a shiny new street car and it's cool to see them on the track, but I'm too competitive for my own good some times.

Anyways, glad to find a fellow karter, its really an incomparable experience with regards to high performance driving when you factor in the low cost.
 

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Only those who have spent some time karting - especially in 125cc shifters - will appreciate that the level of performance and the kick-per-$ are pretty compelling. Personally, I prefer a track-prepped car as I have done a ton more seat time in them over the years and find it easier on my near 60-year-old self...my son is 27 and raced karts from aged 10 to 18, and gets more grins per lap from shifter karts and autocrossing than a road course car.
 

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Which brake fluid do you run? SRF? Which tracks?
I've run OEM, Super Blue for a couple of years (I know how much you love the stuff ;)) with no problems with boiling fluid or warranty issues, now Motul RBF600. Have a case of Wilwood EXP sitting in the garage to try next year (higher boiling points than Motul 600).

Tracks: Watkins Glen, NJMP (both), VIR, Summit Point, Poconos, Mosport, Road Atlanta, Road America once, Shenandoah.

Are you saying you remove your wheels and check the front and back pad thickness after each run? No way I'm up for that until I get a pit crew!
When pads start getting thin I frequently check the outer pads at the top and bottom with the wheels on. When they get really thin, I inspect them with wheels off after every session. Lot of work but I don't mind it. Plus I just got a new high torque impact wrench that should cut down on time - no more breaker bar!

I would surmise that you would have some trouble with stock pads running so thin, especially with anything but very high boiling point fluid. I see you're running PFC and Yellows. Different kettle of fish there. Imagine the guy with Super Blue and stock pads who thinks he's all set. His pads are down to ¼. This is why there's a rule.
True, OEM pads can get the brakes very hot because of all the pressure and effort required to slow the car down. Why I don't recommend them for anyone but newbies. But OEM pads, Pagid Yellows, and PFCs interchange nicely without rotor deposits or other problems. RE: Pagid Orange, I've heard from multiple people about rotor deposits and vibration. Apparently Oranges are known to do this if you don't bed them in properly. Yellows or PFCs, no problemo.

Try marking your pads for position and putting them back where they were. It really helps! I did it your way for years and had variable results. Marking the pads really made a nice improvement for me. They're pretty much instantly bed in when you do this. Worth the small amount of extra care, especially when you're trying to maximize pad life.
Good advice and I used to do that. But brake pads wear very unevenly at the track so I quit doing it. Generally outer pads wear quicker. For individual pads, they wear quicker at the bottom for the front calipers and quicker at the top for rear calipers. Nowadays I mix and match to wear them out more evenly. You get much more out of brake pads this way. IME haven't had any mismatch issues. Like I said, hardly noticeable.

Would love to get feedback on how they work with Gen 1 Cayman S.
PFCs are becoming more and more popular. Definitely more popular than Pagids with the west coast DE crowd (at least on rennlist). PFC is also OEM supplier of 991 Cup brakes. Personally, I've found PFC 06 and 08s to have better bite than Pagid Yellows. I like them a bit better. And they're slightly cheaper to boot. :D "They" say that you can run PFC pads right down to the backing plate, but I've found that you can do the same with Pagid Yellows (I don't go literally down to the backing plate but come pretty close).

What I do with brakes isn't necessarily what I'd recommend to others. But is it possible? Yes.
 
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