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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
KCZ asked my about my pedal install on my 981 CS on the other section... my reply got long so I figured I'd just post it here where it belong anyhow...

SHORT VERSION:
Install was ok but the clutch/brake is harder to install with the nylon locking nuts. I hit some issues but that was mostly due to my not having the right tools (until I went to home depot) mixed with this particular setup of their pedal set... I will explain below. The throttle pedal and dead pedal are easy to install as you just screw right into the stock pedal. Only thing with the throttle was having to dremel a bit and then break off the upper extender backplate. Also had to dremel off the back of the logo. When I tested (just masking-taped the throttle on in the garage to get a feel, I could tell I didn't want the top extender even tho it looks cooler) You have to cut it off if you don't want it. That and any pedal install requires a bit of human contorting to fit in and install.

LONG VERSION:
I had installed a different pedal set on my old 986 and that was a bit of a pain, so I knew what I was in for. The 986 pedals were harder to drill into and was more difficult to install due to previous owner drill holes and the pedal back. By comparison the 981 was a lot better. That said you're still spending time squeezing in under the steering wheel and trying to use force to screw stuff in...

The 981/991 Rennline pedal set by is pretty well made. The instructions are clear and in reality if I had done it with right tools and maybe used my locktite approach I might have been better off. Here's the details:

Throttle Pedal and Extender plate option:
Nicely made, getting the back plate/extender is nice because it has holes so you know from that what black nubs are good to remove for screwing in on the pedal itself. I test fitted/taped bits of the throttle together and just sat in my garage and pressed my brake. I could tell I didn't want the top extender. I had read elsewhere that it's easy to accidentally hit the gas under hard braking if you are not careful. I could see how and I didn't want to risk it.. plus when I have been heel-toe-ing on my car already I am blipping on the bottom with the heel anyhow so I really only wanted the extender on the bottom more for looks than anything else...tho it DOES absolutely make it easier to rev match now. Anyhow knowing that, I took the back plate, and dremmel'd off the top section a bit and bent it off. (I have a vice on a workbench and after dremmel in a little on the each edge just broke it off, then cleaned with the dremmel. The extender plate is already pre-notched so you don't have to cut too much off before removal). After that you just pre-drill thin 1/16" holes and screw in. Easy.

Brake and Clutch Pedal:
The brake and clutch are more difficult to install. The reason is two fold: 1. You need to drill into the brake which is aluminum I think, the clutch was softer I think a hard plastic and 2. You need to install the nut on the backside where you can't easily see. A mirror will help. If you are not careful the nut can be close to the back plastic and be hard to grip while screwing in. Also the nylon nuts I found took a lot of force to screw in. In my case I didn't initially have the proper size crescent wrench to hold the nut. Get one... then this is easy. My life was hard until I went to home depot. :)

The first step is to just slip off the current oem brake/clutch covers...they're just a plastic cover and can easily be popped off or on. Then hold/tape on the pedal after taking out 2-4 nubs (I just installed with two screws on each pedal diagonal from each other) and mark where you are going to drill. Then drill the large 3/16" holes. I used a silver sharpie to mark where I was going to drill. You need to be careful when planning this as you want to make sure you are not drilling on the edge of the pedal and are also not too close to the thick back either so you can get the nut to go back there. I used the left hold on the second row down, and then the bottom most right as the second one.

Now like I said I didn't have a proper crescent at first.. regardless getting the nylon nut to engage and then screwing in is hard. I recommend doing it all by hand so you don't strip the screw. My brake pedal went in pretty straight forward. Had I used good wrench on back it would have been faster...I went back and tightened later after my home depot trip. That said I liked the nylon nut on the bottom right but not on the top. On the clutch I tried two different screws and nylon nuts and stripped both screws trying to get the top screw to go in. Probably just me. I finally got my wrench after my HW store trip but even that was still hard and I was worried about stripping yet another screw even with my proper wrench. Before I started all of this my thought originally was to use locktite. On my 986 pedal set...different vendor... the set was just machine screws, regular nuts and blue locktite. When I went to the hardware store I smartly bought some basic nuts of the same size (8/32") to use instead. Sure enough I just got out my blue (semi permanent but still good) locktite, put on the nut by hand and tightened it down very well. If you can get the nylon nuts on, probably better. I managed to use the nylon on the brake, and the bottom clutch screw. I have this single screw with home depot nut with the locktite version on my clutch pedal and I'm just fine with that. I'll check it now and then to be safe but I doubt it is going anywhere.

Dead Pedal:
Like the throttle this just screws right into the stock backing. Rennline offers a plain dead pedal I think, one with a sticker logo, and another with an actual painted embossed logo. I went for the latter, so you take that and pop it into the dead pedal before installation. Slide on the back lock. Then test fit to the car. You'll probably find the nub for the logo sticks out waaaay to far. Dremmel it down. Then pop out the black nubs they show you to screw in at, pre-drill the smaller 1/16" holes and screw in... again easy as it's just a direct screw into the car, nothing behind it to deal with.

All this said if you haven't done it before it is a bit of a pain. I got fairly banged up just squeezing and contorting to get in and screw everything. If I had to do it again, and had my crescent up front... and if I opted to locktite only it'd be a lot easier. It definitely makes rev matching easier (I don't have sport chrono) with the bottom extender and the red matches my car, so... yeah. Just some interior bling for shows. You're not really gonna see it when driving tho you might notice the pedals feel different I guess. Regardless be careful as you don't want pedals to come loose or have issues when you are driving. Make sure it is done right. If you're not sure have a professional do it.

Here are some pics in order from left to right: 1 The good, 2 test fitting extender by taping it on, 3 Parts after cutting off the top extender backplate, 4/5 final installs

Photo Jan 31, 8 21 37 AM.jpg Photo Jan 31, 8 48 20 AM.jpg Photo Jan 31, 9 19 19 AM.jpg Photo Jan 31, 12 17 24 PM.jpg Photo Jan 31, 1 17 13 PM.jpg
 

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sure does look good, would make heel and toe much easier, thats forsure!
 

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They do look nice. Thanks for the post.
 
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Just ordered these for my 981 so thanks for the write up.


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KCZ asked my about my pedal install on my 981 CS on the other section... my reply got long so I figured I'd just post it here where it belong anyhow...
Thanks again for the write up, it helped a lot. I did my install this afternoon and thought I'd add my comments and describe the throttle lifter plate install to add to the write up. K-Man, you might want to make this thread a sticky in the DIY perhaps.

My install varies a little as I installed the adjustable throttle lifter and have not yet installed the throttle extensions. More on that later. One of the points made on the instructions is to avoid any obstructions when drilling holes, which does come into play when installing the brake and throttle, in my case at least.

Tips:
Use as large a Philips screwdriver as will work to achieve good purchase and avoid stripping the heads while torquing through the nylon nuts or screwing into the plastic. I used a P2.

Nylon nuts are 9mm for all applications. I used a deep well socket and box end wrench.


THROTTLE LIFTER:
One of my main goals was to raise the accelerator pedal a bit to make heel-toeing easier at sub 10/10th driving. The Rennline throttle lifter allows adjustability for the top and bottom of the accelerator independently. The aluminum pedal then bolts on to this piece rather than the stock pedal.

The first thing you will notice is the instruction pictures are not from a 981. The pedal pictured is a polymer looking piece and ours is rubber with aluminum trim and has a different shape. Once you tape the template to the pedal, check for the obstructions where your bit, and thus screws will go. I found that the bottom right screw would go into a mass of polymer on the back of the pedal. Not knowing what is enclosed in it, I marked the location but didn't drill the 3/16 hole. If I find out there isn't anything there I may go back and do it but I didn't want to drill through a wire or something inadvertently. You also have to drill three 7/16" holes 3/8" deep to accommodate seating of the threaded collars. Our pedal is not that thick and 7/16" is a big hole so it would end up being all the way through the pedal. However, this large bit would also go into the mass of polymer so I decided not to drill these three holes, yet. Instead, I screwed in the two mounting sheet metal screws and the threaded collars just sit flush to the surface of the stock pedal instead of being recessed, or countersunk, into it. It seems very stable and tight, the main disadvantage is that it raises the throttle up 3/8" at a minimum, but I don't think this will be a problem as I want at least that much height anyway.

The bolts that mount the Rennline Accelerator pedal to the throttle lifter use the same nylon lined nuts. The key is to tighten them almost snug to the pedal, leaving it just loose enough for the bolt to turn but not loose enough where there is any play. Once mounted, they can be snugged up if necessary.

Once I confirm there are no wires or electronics in that polymer mass, I may go ahead and drill the 7/16 holes to countersink the collar.

THROTTLE PEDAL:
Using the bolts from the throttle lifter with the washer and nylon nut tightened but loose enough to allow the bolt to turn freely, align the bolts with the threaded collar on the lifter plate. Adjustments are made by threading the bolts in or out of the collar to your preferred pedal height.

If I go back and countersink the collars mentioned above, I will have to back the bolts out approx 3/8" to keep the same height. I'm sure other length bolts can be purchased if the length is too short or too long.

CLUTCH/BRAKE PEDAL:

Brake pedal is metal, clutch is polymer as noted. I used some masking tape to mark my drilling points on the pedal once the cover was removed. There are double thick metal layers and welds where the pedal mounts to the arm on the back of the brake pedal. This meant I had to choose holes on the outer top rather than the center. I chose two around 10 and 2 and skipped a center 6 position.

Here's the deal, it is metal and it was hard to get a pilot hole started. Every time the bit hit the metal it wanted to walk off the point. Had I tried to drill through the double layer, it would have been even harder. The second hole isn't as hard because you can use the pedal hole as a drill guide to hold the bit on center, if you are careful.

As a result of the difficulty getting the pilot hole started, my holes ended up being a little unlevel. It's not bad, but after marking the points so carefully, I was a bit frustrated by my result.

The nuts mcomet refers to are a bit tricky. Make sure they are not cross threaded then use a deep well 9mm socket to hold it in place as you tighten the bolt with a P2 Phillips screw driver. When it gets close to tight, my socket wouldn't stay on the nut due to a ridge on the back of the pedal. The box end wrench slipped on fine and I tightened them up without a problem. As he described, it is kind of hard to get to the back of the brake pedal.

The clutch is polymer and mounts exactly the same way, but drilling is easy. It takes just a few minutes to do using the same method as the brake.

Note: metal shavings get on the floorboard so you may want to put a rag down to collect them. I just vacuumed them up but they sort of cling to the carpet pile a bit.

DEAD PEDAL:
2 screws, done. It takes 2 minutes.

THROTTLE EXTENDER:
I have them but haven't installed them yet. I first want to see how just raising the throttle pedal works first. If I do mount them and decide not to use one or the other extenders, rather than cutting off a mounting tab, I may cut the upper from lower horizontally, that way I can use it in the future if I change my mind. I haven't looked to be sure that this would work, but it should if I can have two sets of mounting bolts on each half.

I hope this helps and adds to mcomet's excellent write up. I'll post more if I change something in the future.


You can see the crooked brake pedal. If it weren't so difficult, I might drill somewhere else in hopes of straightening it up, but for now I'm going to live with it. Part of the problem is you are working at an angle and don't realize it's crooked until looking straight on to it.





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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes all great additions and what I ran into as well for much of it. This is the second set of aftermarket pedals I've done. After each time I've always said "never again". Heh. Looks good tho. And yes drilling into brake is hard to keep drill centered. My brake is also slightly off ;)
 

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What's the pedal on the left of the brake for?
Does that activate the PDK flux capacitor?
:cheers:
If it's visible when you open the door, the dead pedal is a work of art.
 
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Yes all great additions and what I ran into as well for much of it. This is the second set of aftermarket pedals I've done. After each time I've always said "never again". Heh. Looks good tho. And yes drilling into brake is hard to keep drill centered. My brake is also slightly off ;)
You know what I mean about the mass of polymer on the bottom right of the accelerator pedal. Did you drill into it anyway or somehow avoid it?


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In my case I didn't install the throttle extender version like you I just bought the basic throttle pedal with the side extender not the lift plate one. So my install was just very thin drill bit in the pre marked three holes of the backing plate and then hand screw right in. Nothing needed in the back of the throttle etc. I just went for it knowing this kit was for a 991/981 and assumed it was safe to do a small pilot hole. No problems that I know off. If your talking about the thicker screws and nylon nuts like the clutch and brake have then I'd be more worried.
 

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Fascinating and I bookmarked the thread as I do plan on a pedal set -- I think my preference is the OP's choice of pedals, but with the throttle lifter, which I hope would make a big difference for me.
 

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In my case I didn't install the throttle extender version like you I just bought the basic throttle pedal with the side extender not the lift plate one. So my install was just very thin drill bit in the pre marked three holes of the backing plate and then hand screw right in. Nothing needed in the back of the throttle etc. I just went for it knowing this kit was for a 991/981 and assumed it was safe to do a small pilot hole. No problems that I know off. If your talking about the thicker screws and nylon nuts like the clutch and brake have then I'd be more worried.
Ok good to know. The base plate of the throttle lifter installs onto stock pedal exactly the same way as the Rennline pedal, with the screws. The holes for the collars are the only difference, which just allows the collars to seat flush.


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Fascinating and I bookmarked the thread as I do plan on a pedal set -- I think my preference is the OP's choice of pedals, but with the throttle lifter, which I hope would make a big difference for me.
They are the same pedals. You can buy just the accelerator pedal or the three pedals or the three plus dead pedal, your choice. The throttle lifter and throttle extensions are accessories for the accelerator pedal and can be used together or separately.

They are available in silver or black, with rubber or without, and the extensions are available in black, silver or red.

The dead pedal can have Rennline logo or Porsche logo sticker or Porsche badge. Mine is the Rennline, mcomet has the badge.


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Thanks for the great write-up mcomet and speeddeacon. Those pedals look great. I will be very interested to hear if the lifted accelerator pedal aids in heel and toeing.
 

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Ok, so finding no indication that there is anything important on the back of the accelerator pedal on the right, tonight I went back into the garage and drilled the recesses for the throttle lifter base plate. It now sits flush to the stock accelerator pedal, as designed. I also secured the third mounting screw on the bottom right. It appears no electricals or mechanicals were harmed in the filming of the install, :rolleyes:.

While I was at it, I decided to straighten out that crooked brake pedal. It turns out that getting the nut and bolt on are easier than getting it off because the ridges make it hard to get that wrench on very well. Eventually I got them off and taped the pedal cover level on the pedal again. This time I got a proper metal drill bit, grew a pair and drilled the 6 o'clock hole through the double layer of aluminum on the pedal. I used the hole in the pedal cover as a drill guide until I had a nice punch, then moved it out of the way to drill the hole through. The nut/bold are much easier to thread and tighten here because there are no ridges down there to deal with. Now it looks good, as it should.

One detail, my feet are quite valgus, externally rotated from center about 45 degrees, in other words penguin toed instead of pigeon toed. It is not anatomically possible for me perform the classic heel-toe technique without rolling up on my left side. So I use the foot roll technique where the inside of the ball of the foot is on the brake and the outside of the foot is on the accelerator. I plan on fine tuning the height of the pedal to get it exactly where I want it and will report back after the Nor'easter blows through and I get to drive it more, which may be spring. I will probably put the throttle extenders on at some point, just because I bought them, but I don't think I'll need them with the added pedal height. I also have wide feet so the gap isn't an issue for me.

Here are the update pix after the fine tuning.


 

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Looks great!!!

While I like the look of the Rennline pedals. Drilling the stock pedals makes me cringe.
I am not looking for the extension to the accelerator to heel-toe as I have a PDK but the aluminum looks really slick.
Has anyone installed the OEM aluminum pedals that might be able to offe some installation insight?
 

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Don't know about the OEM pedals. But the only big holes are with the throttle lifter, which you wouldn't need. The cover on the brake is removed, on 6 mt at least, so holes wouldn't show if Rennline removed and stock put back on. The holes on accelerator and dead pedal are just small screw holes and could be filled with black silicone I imagine. Just FYI.


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Thanks to OP mcomet for this thread and speeddeacon for additional tips. It gave me the confidence to order and install.

I don't have much to add. As said above, dead pedal and accelerator are easy, do these first. Brake and clutch pedals are tough because of you must be careful to select your drill hole to give you enough room to grasp the nylon nut behind the pedal. Plan carefully before you drill.Start with a small bit (I used 1/64) and work your way up gradually especially for the metal brake pedal. I found making the first drill hole near the bottom of the pedal at the midline worked best, and needed just one more hole each pedal (upper midline for brake, upper lateral for clutch). I used a 9 mm socket and socket wrench to hold the nut once I had started it by hand, and turning the screw with a short barrel phillips driver.

OEM brake and clutch pedals are just cheap booties over the raw pedals, and the others are also comparatively cheap material -- compared to the Rennline machined aluminum. Good to have this upgrade done, and it brightens up the dark cave in the black interior.

2015-12-31 pedals.jpg
 

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Thanks to OP mcomet for this thread and speeddeacon for additional tips. It gave me the confidence to order and install.

I don't have much to add. As said above, dead pedal and accelerator are easy, do these first. Brake and clutch pedals are tough because of you must be careful to select your drill hole to give you enough room to grasp the nylon nut behind the pedal. Plan carefully before you drill.Start with a small bit (I used 1/64) and work your way up gradually especially for the metal brake pedal. I found making the first drill hole near the bottom of the pedal at the midline worked best, and needed just one more hole each pedal (upper midline for brake, upper lateral for clutch). I used a 9 mm socket and socket wrench to hold the nut once I had started it by hand, and turning the screw with a short barrel phillips driver.

OEM brake and clutch pedals are just cheap booties over the raw pedals, and the others are also comparatively cheap material -- compared to the Rennline machined aluminum. Good to have this upgrade done, and it brightens up the dark cave in the black interior.


Nicely done! I am building up the stones to do mine. Besides functionality, I agree that they look awesome. How long did the installation take?
 
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