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How long should I expect my original rotors to last? I have a 2015 Cayman with about 26k miles.

I believe my dealer quoted me $2,300 to replace brakes and rotors. I found an fairly local indy shop that can do the same job using OEM parts for $1400. I also have an experienced friend who expressed interest in helping me DIY. I priced the parts out around $800. Does that sound about right?

My car is a little jerky front to back when braking at slower speeds.

Thanks.
 

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How long they last depends on how hard you are on them. Some go sooner and some go later. Rotors should be replaced when 1mm per side (2mm total) is removed - you would need to measure the rotor thickness with a micrometer and check. A well established lip on the outer most part of the rotor is usually a good sign of 1mm/side as they generally wear the same on both sides. Pads come with wear sensors so that makes it easy to determine when the pads need to be replaced but you can measure them and you would want to allow for at least some material left at a minimum. I don't know what the sensors are setup for a minum. The job is a reasonable DIY and there are a few videos showing how to do it with the proper tools (look for Dan Day or AutoDOC). Your parts price is about right for OEM. Typically a full brake flush is done if not done previously and would cost a bit more ($80 fluid).

Jerkiness can be caused by different things. Check after to see if it remains. Hope this helps.
 

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The only potentially challenging aspect of doing a Porsche brake job is removing the anti-vibration dampers. They can get stuck in the bores in the caliper - I've had one so badly rusted into the bore it required replacement of a front caliper on a 2011 911 - and can be a real pain to get out. Make SURE that you don't use a petroleum-based solvent to loosen them up as it can damage the surrounding seals.
 

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$800 DIY sounds about right. Depending on what pads and rotors you choose. I went with Zimmerman coated rotors from Pelican, and they work great.

Also, if you planning on keeping a car for some time, you might consider removing your brake pad sensors. Makes life much easier.
 

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Also, if you planning on keeping a car for some time, you might consider removing your brake pad sensors. Makes life much easier.
I've done this on my past 2 P-cars. Easiest way is to just tie up the sensors out of the way, however on my Cayman I cut off the sensor, spliced the wires and used heat shrink wrap to keep mositure and dirt from penetrating, then wrapped up in electrical tape and tied up out of the way.
 

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I've done this on my past 2 P-cars. Easiest way is to just tie up the sensors out of the way, however on my Cayman I cut off the sensor, spliced the wires and used heat shrink wrap to keep mositure and dirt from penetrating, then wrapped up in electrical tape and tied up out of the way.
I did exactly the same.
 

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If you are going to keep your car for a while, consider fcpeuro. Free replacements for life (or until the company goes bankrupt). They have Porsche OEM parts as well as aftermarket parts like Sebro slotted rotors. They don't seem to be stocking the OEM or Sebro 981 rear rotors currently, but I have bought them there before.
 

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I plan on shorting my sensors as well when they sound off. Brake wear tracking is such a basic maintenance issue that I check mine regularly from 40 years of auto maintenance hard knocks education. Do these Porsche brakes have a mechanical squeal sensor, or just the electronic ones? If only electronic than more frequent checking is required once shorted.

No worries, I started on 4 wheel drum brakes. When the shoe rivets hit the drum it's past time for new everything. Best to pull and peak at every oil change, or when changing the points and setting the dwell.
 

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I plan on shorting my sensors as well when they sound off. Brake wear tracking is such a basic maintenance issue that I check mine regularly from 40 years of auto maintenance hard knocks education. Do these Porsche brakes have a mechanical squeal sensor, or just the electronic ones? If only electronic than more frequent checking is required once shorted.

No worries, I started on 4 wheel drum brakes. When the shoe rivets hit the drum it's past time for new everything. Best to pull and peak at every oil change, or when changing the points and setting the dwell.
Shorting the sensors will give you a constant alarm. The sensors are a pair of wires embedded in plastic molded to fit in a groove at the edge between abrasive pad and metal base of the brake pads. When the rotor has removed enough of the abrasive, it wears away the plastic until the two wires are shorted together by the steel of the rotor. The wires must be cut off and insulated so they cannot make contact with each othe.
 

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Shorting the sensors will give you a constant alarm.
Not true. You just need to cut the wires and solder them together. I have done it. When the plastic wears it causes the filament to break and interrupts the circuit.
 
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