Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm new here because I recently decided to shop for a late-gen Cayman as my all-season daily driver, but I live in an apartment in Northern Virginia and don't have a garage or storage space. There are a lot of daily driver threads out there, but I didn't find any that addressed my constraints (I can't own multiple set of tires, etc.). So in the name of due diligence, I have the following questions:

* Any advice on how to make this as practical as possible?
* I prefer 19" wheels on the Cayman, will I be SOL for a worthwhile "all-season" tire?
* Aside from winter driving and out-of-town battery maintenance challenges, are there any other pitfalls that I should be aware of?

Thanks in advance. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Tex34,

I too live in No. VA, but have a garage with my condo just big enough for my car and not much anything else. Ended up renting a storage unit for my extra stuff nearby, including my off-season tires. You really don't want to go with the all-season tire for a car like this as it would really take away from its performance. Keep a set of Winter tires in a storage unit and swap them out when needed. If this is your daily driver then chances are your Summer tires will only last 10K miles and may need to be swapped each season anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Yeah, where are you going to drive it? I moved down here from DC to NC almost 20 years ago and every time I go back up there, the traffic just gets worse and worse, both around town and the highway.

When it snows down here, I don't drive it - fortunately I can telecommute when that happens. About a year ago in my previous car (2006 CS) I got caught in a snow storm on the way home from work and with only about an inch on the ground I had to abandon the car about 2 miles from home - fortunately I was able to get it into an office park parking lot. That was with summer tires - don't know if all seasons would have made a difference. Others might be able to speak to that.

It's a great car and my 2006 was my DD for over 8 years and my current CGTS is also my DD (20" wheels and sports suspension and all) but I think I'd be pretty frustrated with the car in DC traffic. If you're not considering PDK, you might want to change your mind (I'm a 100% manual guy, never owned an automatic) but DC traffic might make me reconsider.

Either way - good luck in your search.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, where are you going to drive it? I moved down here from DC to NC almost 20 years ago and every time I go back up there, the traffic just gets worse and worse, both around town and the highway.

When it snows down here, I don't drive it - fortunately I can telecommute when that happens. About a year ago in my previous car (2006 CS) I got caught in a snow storm on the way home from work and with only about an inch on the ground I had to abandon the car about 2 miles from home - fortunately I was able to get it into an office park parking lot. That was with summer tires - don't know if all seasons would have made a difference. Others might be able to speak to that.

It's a great car and my 2006 was my DD for over 8 years and my current CGTS is also my DD (20" wheels and sports suspension and all) but I think I'd be pretty frustrated with the car in DC traffic. If you're not considering PDK, you might want to change your mind (I'm a 100% manual guy, never owned an automatic) but DC traffic might make me reconsider.

Either way - good luck in your search.
Haha, good question. This city is a driver's disaster. Thankfully I do a lot of driving on the GW Parkway and do my best to avoid rush hour, so I that'll be fun. That being said, I'll have no choice but to get an automatic. I had a manual when I first moved here and it was exhausting - never again as long as I live here.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,989 Posts
I'm new here because I recently decided to shop for a late-gen Cayman as my all-season daily driver, but I live in an apartment in Northern Virginia and don't have a garage or storage space. There are a lot of daily driver threads out there, but I didn't find any that addressed my constraints (I can't own multiple set of tires, etc.). So in the name of due diligence, I have the following questions:

* Any advice on how to make this as practical as possible?
* I prefer 19" wheels on the Cayman, will I be SOL for a worthwhile "all-season" tire?
* Aside from winter driving and out-of-town battery maintenance challenges, are there any other pitfalls that I should be aware of?
Welcome to the forum

People have owned and driven sports cars as their only car, while living in an apt, since as long as their has been sports cars and apartments. Do not let anyone tell you different.

1. DO NOT try to drive with the OEM summer tires below 40 degrees unless you must. They are too dangerous. Never drive with them below 20. They can crack. Google it.

2. DO NOT drive on snow or ice for any reason with summers. Not worth the accident waiting to happen.

3. DO NOT get all-seasons tires. While they are completely suitable for AWD SUVs. It's much better to get a set of 4 snow tires.

4. Where to store the snows? Like others said, rent a small storage unit or just stash them in a space in an extra bedroom. However, you might want to ask: How are you going to get them to and from wherever you have them installed? They will not fit in the Cayman

a. Rent a SUV for the day, drive the tires to an installer, drive the cayman there, go get the SUV, pick up the tires and stash them, return SUV
b. Have a friend drive the tires back and forth
c. Find a tire installer willing to store the tires for you
d. Make multiple trips to the tire installer carrying one at a time

5. Be aware of the different snow emergency laws in the metro area. You will need to Google them. Two states and DC, different rules. They will give you a ticket if you break the rules and are caught.

6. Most winters are no big deal. A few tiny dustings of snow, mild temps into the 20s. But some winters can be bad. Every 5 years or so will be a major blizzard. Some years, like 2013, will be a lot of small, annoying storms. Some winters will be ice storms. Last winter was little snow but cold until April.

7. If you can't plug in your car, and you leave it without driving it, sooner or later it will die. This might be hard in open parking apartment areas. My biggest worry here would be when you get one of the major storms, nothing moves for days, no way to drive the car, below 20 degrees for days. Not sure what to do there.

8. Do NOT just run short trips or just let it idle to charge the battery. It will not charge. The car needs to be driven.

9. DO NOT speed excessively in VA. Over 90 gets you jail time. Over 80 or 20 over the PSL is reckless driving. Its no joke. Google it. Lots of stories. No RD in VA or DC. Illegal.

10. Potholes. Learn to love them every spring.

11. Road construction. Learn to love that too.

It's not as bad as it sounds.

1. Figure out how to stash your snow tires. Better mounted so you just switch wheels twice a year.
2. Figure out what to do when you can't drive the car, because sooner or later it will happen.

Or buy a beater.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
The Cayman(s) are great in the snow .. that being said, TIRES ARE EVERYTHING.
I drove this past winter with Michelin Alpin PA4 on my 19's.
My car did not see a garage during the whole winter.
snow2.jpg
Several days I was rushed to dig her out just before the next storm came along.
snow1.jpg
But the driving was great, and yes even fun.

Enjoy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Tex34,

I too live in No. VA, but have a garage with my condo just big enough for my car and not much anything else. Ended up renting a storage unit for my extra stuff nearby, including my off-season tires. You really don't want to go with the all-season tire for a car like this as it would really take away from its performance. Keep a set of Winter tires in a storage unit and swap them out when needed. If this is your daily driver then chances are your Summer tires will only last 10K miles and may need to be swapped each season anyway.
Yeah I was afraid folks would suggest that swapping tires is the only way. I'd hate to get a storage unit just for tires, but maybe I can strike a deal with one of my friends who has extra space. Someone's gonna need to drive the tires to the shop for me anyway, hehehe. Do most people stick to 18" for the winter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Welcome to the forum

People have owned and driven sports cars as their only car, while living in an apt, since as long as their has been sports cars and apartments. Do not let anyone tell you different.

1. DO NOT try to drive with the OEM summer tires below 40 degrees unless you must. They are too dangerous. Never drive with them below 20. They can crack. Google it.

2. DO NOT drive on snow or ice for any reason with summers. Not worth the accident waiting to happen.

3. DO NOT get all-seasons tires. While they are completely suitable for AWD SUVs. It's much better to get a set of 4 snow tires.

4. Where to store the snows? Like others said, rent a small storage unit or just stash them in a space in an extra bedroom. However, you might want to ask: How are you going to get them to and from wherever you have them installed? They will not fit in the Cayman

a. Rent a SUV for the day, drive the tires to an installer, drive the cayman there, go get the SUV, pick up the tires and stash them, return SUV
b. Have a friend drive the tires back and forth
c. Find a tire installer willing to store the tires for you
d. Make multiple trips to the tire installer carrying one at a time

5. Be aware of the different snow emergency laws in the metro area. You will need to Google them. Two states and DC, different rules. They will give you a ticket if you break the rules and are caught.

6. Most winters are no big deal. A few tiny dustings of snow, mild temps into the 20s. But some winters can be bad. Every 5 years or so will be a major blizzard. Some years, like 2013, will be a lot of small, annoying storms. Some winters will be ice storms. Last winter was little snow but cold until April.

7. If you can't plug in your car, and you leave it without driving it, sooner or later it will die. This might be hard in open parking apartment areas. My biggest worry here would be when you get one of the major storms, nothing moves for days, no way to drive the car, below 20 degrees for days. Not sure what to do there.

8. Do NOT just run short trips or just let it idle to charge the battery. It will not charge. The car needs to be driven.

9. DO NOT speed excessively in VA. Over 90 gets you jail time. Over 80 or 20 over the PSL is reckless driving. Its no joke. Google it. Lots of stories. No RD in VA or DC. Illegal.

10. Potholes. Learn to love them every spring.

11. Road construction. Learn to love that too.

It's not as bad as it sounds.

1. Figure out how to stash your snow tires. Better mounted so you just switch wheels twice a year.
2. Figure out what to do when you can't drive the car, because sooner or later it will happen.

Or buy a beater.
Awesome list, thanks! Good point on winter rules, I hadn't thought about that. Nor did I realize that summer tires were so temp intolerant. This will be my first sports car. Kinda looking forward to learning all these things.

Regarding #7, how hard is it to remove the battery on a Cayman? If I'm gone for over a week, would it be reasonable to bring the battery into my apartment and plug in? Or is that a big hassle and not good for the car? I read that this is a bigger issue the pre-2009 model and less pesky afterwards, is that true? I really don't travel that much, this is something I'd only worry about maybe 2x per year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
Well in NC it hardly gets cold enough to require snow tires. I think in DC area you probably should look into having a winter set as you do get some decent winter weather up there.

I use summer tires in the winter, when its like around 40 degree (even down to like 20) and the pavement is dry. Works out fine and honestly not noticeable difference than if it were hot outside. I wouldn't and don't use summer tires in ice or snow though.

Trying cars with all season tires, I wouldn't recommend that because summer tires make a big deal in handling improvement...but you can get all seasons with a slightly different size than stock (as long as you're not getting more than +1 or -1 bigger/smaller, you would be fine).

Not sure what your concerns are about daily driving. People do it all the time and its whats a car is for. This isn't a car that is designed to be garaged and only driven on weekends, though people do that (and there is nothing wrong with it).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,989 Posts
Awesome list, thanks! Good point on winter rules, I hadn't thought about that. Nor did I realize that summer tires were so temp intolerant. This will be my first sports car. Kinda looking forward to learning all these things.

Regarding #7, how hard is it to remove the battery on a Cayman? If I'm gone for over a week, would it be reasonable to bring the battery into my apartment and plug in? Or is that a big hassle and not good for the car? I read that this is a bigger issue the pre-2009 model and less pesky afterwards, is that true? I really don't travel that much, this is something I'd only worry about maybe 2x per year.
Winter temperatures can be all over the place. One year it can be 70 degrees at Christmas, the next year a foot of snow and -5 degrees. There is little consistency although there seems to be runs of mild years followed by runs of harsh years with blizzard thrown in every 6 years or so. The last big one was 2010 with two majors snows (32" in places).

The original batteries (Moll) had the acid separate from the battery. If you needed one, the dealer had to pour in the acid and charge it. This could take hours. It's not like going to Sears and telling them to get a new DieHard. But people do buy other batteries from Walmart of whoever. There are many many threads on dead batteries. I would just monitor it. If you live up north, you knew when the battery was dying, and just go have the dealer put in a new one. I don't see why you can't take it out but I don't know what needs to be reset because of the electronics. Do a search.

Changing Battery


BTW, IF the battery dies and the car is locked, well then you got a problem. You can use the key to manually open the door but then you need ANOTHER battery to open the frunk. See the video. They don't make it easy.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Yeah I was afraid folks would suggest that swapping tires is the only way. I'd hate to get a storage unit just for tires, but maybe I can strike a deal with one of my friends who has extra space. Someone's gonna need to drive the tires to the shop for me anyway, hehehe. Do most people stick to 18" for the winter?
Given the hassle of getting tires to and from a dealer for change out, you might want to just invest in a Winter wheel/tire package. If you do, the 18" wheels work well and would be a little cheaper than the 19" package. A hand crank jack and lug wrench and you are set to swap out the wheels when needed. Make friends with a co-worker who has some spare basement room to store your wheels/tires, and if they have a working garage all the better :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
I commute from MD to DC daily and yes, traffic is a nightmare but the commute in my CGTS remains the high point of my day. I actually enjoy working the clutch and gear shift in traffic.... give me something to do. When I drove an automatic, I got horribly bored.

I remember how difficult it was, back in the day, when I lived on the third floor of a garden apartment and had to lug my toolbox down three flights of stairs to the parking lot to work on my car. Then hope no one steals any of my tools while I ran back up to get something I'd forgotten. As others have said, it's not a difficult job to swap the wheels out. If I had that problem back then, I probably would have stored the wheels on the balcony under a tarp.

I will also recommend 18" wheels for winter. That gives you more sidewall to absorb the impacts with all those fabulous DC metro potholes (which they still haven't fixed from last winter).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
Hello,

I'm new here because I recently decided to shop for a late-gen Cayman as my all-season daily driver, but I live in an apartment in Northern Virginia and don't have a garage or storage space. There are a lot of daily driver threads out there, but I didn't find any that addressed my constraints (I can't own multiple set of tires, etc.). So in the name of due diligence, I have the following questions:

* Any advice on how to make this as practical as possible?
* I prefer 19" wheels on the Cayman, will I be SOL for a worthwhile "all-season" tire?
* Aside from winter driving and out-of-town battery maintenance challenges, are there any other pitfalls that I should be aware of?

Thanks in advance. :)
Hate to say it but coming from wisc you have 3 options:
1.Get a winter beater
2. buy an Audi or VW
3.move
Sorry. carl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Artrem, just curious, do you have an Agate Grey CGTS? I keep seeing one in my office parking garage near foggy bottom...
Nope, not me. Mine is Dark Metallic Blue (photo in my profile). I've yet to see another CGTS or BGTS anywhere in this area, except at a PCA event.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
I basically didn't drive much during the winter, but then I live next to a Metro station and don't need a car to get to work. My Millenial instincts have managed to get me around where I need to without a car just fine in this area. Whenever there was a trace of salt on the roads, the car stayed stored in my condo garage lot. Once a month I'd run over 100ft of power extension cable to a CTEK charger to charge up the battery in strange hours just to make sure it would crank over on that random weekend day where the temps are above freezing in the middle of January.

My place isn't that big (1 bedroom) and I still stored my winter wheels indoors back when I had a set for my old 135i. Just hold them in Tire Totes, stack them in pairs, place a wood board over it, and cover it up with some drape and use it as a small shelf or table for a vase or family altar or something ;). They make OK speaker stands too if you're into audiophile stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,076 Posts
This is a great list. I live in NOVA and have had sport cars as my daily drivers for the last 15 years. I commuted every day to DC and traffic is bad but not as bad as say, NYC. Winter tires are a must. Don't spend 80 or 90K and then worry about a winter tire set - one mishap and you're on the losing side of that equation. While you can run summer tires in the winter as many here point out, the actual experts advise against it. You can do lots of things you shouldn't and there is no penalty until you get caught or have that accident. Until recently, I travelled quite a bit. I was gone for up to 3 weeks at a time and never had a problem with the battery. My car is, however, garaged. As to the tires, I found a detail shop near Dulles that will store a set of tires for about $10 per month. I leave the tire set there and bring the car in for a fall and spring full detail and tire swap. He can't mount and balance but he does have a lift and can swap the tires out for about $50. One word of advice, the GW Parkway may look like fun but it is patrolled by federal Park Police. Be careful or you will be ticketed. There are plenty of fun roads here in Virginia and all you have to do is drive out a bit to find nice driving roads with little traffic. The PCA here is very active, if you're not a member, I would advise joining. Good luck and enjoy the car.


Awesome list, thanks! Good point on winter rules, I hadn't thought about that. Nor did I realize that summer tires were so temp intolerant. This will be my first sports car. Kinda looking forward to learning all these things.

Regarding #7, how hard is it to remove the battery on a Cayman? If I'm gone for over a week, would it be reasonable to bring the battery into my apartment and plug in? Or is that a big hassle and not good for the car? I read that this is a bigger issue the pre-2009 model and less pesky afterwards, is that true? I really don't travel that much, this is something I'd only worry about maybe 2x per year.
 
  • Like
Reactions: chows4us

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
2014-15 was my first winter in the Boxster, but dailied my S2000 and my Miata for 14 winters before that (I'm on the other side of the river, so I have less traffic but worse roads than you). A complete set of winter wheels/tires was my 1st purchase after the car. With them, you're fine in snow until you run out of ground clearance. Without snows, I'd question driving ANY CAR in this region in winter weather.

Post #5, idea 4c, sounds worthwhile for you to explore, I've heard of such things.

It helps if you have a job where you can tell your boss "I don't think so, Tim" after five inches or so of snowfall.

Hello,

I'm new here because I recently decided to shop for a late-gen Cayman as my all-season daily driver, but I live in an apartment in Northern Virginia and don't have a garage or storage space. There are a lot of daily driver threads out there, but I didn't find any that addressed my constraints (I can't own multiple set of tires, etc.). So in the name of due diligence, I have the following questions:

* Any advice on how to make this as practical as possible?
* I prefer 19" wheels on the Cayman, will I be SOL for a worthwhile "all-season" tire?
* Aside from winter driving and out-of-town battery maintenance challenges, are there any other pitfalls that I should be aware of?

Thanks in advance. :)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top