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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everybody,

I just purchased a used '06 Cayman S last September, and was interested in any advice that could prolong the life of my Cayman, other than just following the maintenance schedule. I purchased this car with about 45k miles and use it generally for weekend use, with a reasonable amount of wear, I don't over-rev (nothing over say 4k RPM); I have little intention of ever tracking this car, but intend to use it as a touring car for long trips to state parks; I purchased it because I love the way it looks and handles. I understand that most of the major issues associated with this car tend to happen to folks who track it regularly (and don't make the necessary modifications). I don't want to condemn individuals who bravely pursue to explore the limits of grip and performance of this car (it DOES sound like fun!), but I personally want to keep and preserve this fine specimen of a vehicle for as long as I can with reasonable use. Let's face it, if I had a Porsche 356 or a Lamborghini Miura, I wouldn't drive it like a madman, but i'd use it and maintain it as the automotive icon it deserves to be. With that being said, does anybody have any long term survivability advice for 987 Cayman S ownership?
 

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No advice here, but I don't consider 45k high mileage. And if you don't run over 4k RPM, you are missing out on a fair amount of fun.

I bought my CS 2 years ago. She will turn 50,000 miles as soon as we get a few nice days. Personally, I think the mileage is nothing to worry about.


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Use Joe Gibbs Driven DT40 motor oil; change every 5k miles. Get oil sample analyses to monitor engine conditions. Change the water pump every 40k miles or 4 years. Drive it regularly and don't be afraid to run it to redline occasionally.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, I agree 45k isn't high mileage, but I wonder if it would be realistic to expect this car to reach 200k like it's Japanese counterparts? My brother had a BMW Z4 that crapped out with vanos issues at 94k miles; I was hoping that I could have a better experience with German engineering going with Porsche; I understand that it might take a significant amount of money to keep this car on the road for that long, but I became an engineer specifically to be able to afford Porsche ownership. I've read most of the FAQs and threads associated with IMS issues on this website. I've solicited a quote from a company that would perform the IMS upgrade (which would involve the 'invasive' surgery) for around $10k, but i'm understandably hesitant at this point. I feel reasonably informed about some of the issues with the 987 platform, such as the oil starvation issues, gear shifter linkage issues and connecting rod bolt failure(s). Is there any required milestones that I should replace certain things before they become a monumental problem, since the Porsche official maintenance schedule doesn't cover the tribal knowledge pervasive on this online community?
 

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If you don't have documentation when the water pump was last done I would change it and the thermostat.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cheers, Boiler Inspector;

I guess I'm due for a new water pump. Do you know of any aftermarket manufacturer that makes more durable impellers to replace the plastic OEM ones?
 

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I've seen plenty of 100k+ mileage 987s for sale, keep up on the basic maint, fluids, etc. Like mentioned here the water pump is something you should replace occasionally, and isn't a difficult DIY. Shift cables may go on you at some point, but those are the big ones that I'm aware of for a gently driven daily.
 

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Cheers, Boiler Inspector;

I guess I'm due for a new water pump. Do you know of any aftermarket manufacturer that makes more durable impellers to replace the plastic OEM ones?
I want to say the conventional wisdom on P9 is to use the OEM water pump because one with brass or metal impeller, when it fails, will contact the engine block, thus contaminating the coolant system with metal shavings. Someone will be along shortly yo correct me if I'm wrong.n where in TX are you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm in Houston; I purchased it at Porsche North Houston via consignment, I haven't found a good reliable independent mechanic yet, so any servicing is through *gasp* the dealer at this point because i don't feel i'm educated and confident enough to perform servicing on my own yet like my other car. I have a unique theory of engine longevity amongst my automotive friends, that HEAT is the enemy and so I always prop up the hood of my other car after use and point a fan to cool the engine. When my best friend saw my post-flight routine, he just about laughed his *** off, but I don't care, because I have healthy belts and hoses on my other car. Obviously, the Cayman is different, so i've been tempted to point fans into the intake plenums after use. Am I just crazy? I don't know. I love my cars.
 

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Heat I do feel is a moderate issue with these cars even stock. In the summer after stopping my car the fans would kick on in my garage for a while. Water Temp gauge never read over medium. Installed the 987/997 Third Radiator Kit (available from Suncoast for the best price I could find) since I track the car occasionally. Car NEVER kicks the fans on any more after turning the car off. So even though according to the gauge I'm not running cooler, clearly the car has benefited from the upgrade. And that's in New Hampshire!
 

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I'm in Houston; I purchased it at Porsche North Houston via consignment, I haven't found a good reliable independent mechanic yet, so any servicing is through *gasp* the dealer at this point because i don't feel i'm educated and confident enough to perform servicing on my own yet like my other car. I have a unique theory of engine longevity amongst my automotive friends, that HEAT is the enemy and so I always prop up the hood of my other car after use and point a fan to cool the engine. When my best friend saw my post-flight routine, he just about laughed his *** off, but I don't care, because I have healthy belts and hoses on my other car. Obviously, the Cayman is different, so i've been tempted to point fans into the intake plenums after use. Am I just crazy? I don't know. I love my cars.
One of the big things I was worried about before I bought this car was that servicing it would be a pain. I was wrong. Everything I've seen up to this point has been logically laid out and straightforward. The only thing that really sucked for no good reason was replacing the rear shocks. Don't recommend doing that on your own ha ha. But just start doing your oil changes (which are super easy) and you'll get more familiar with working on this car.
 

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Porsches are very strong cars, and can last a long time with proper care. Here in Southern Cal you see 30 and 40 year old Porsches driving around every day. I have owned some of them myself, most of them easily going over 100K miles. My recent race car was a 40 year old 914 with a 35 year old rebuilt 911 engine, and still performs amazingly well.

Yes, stuff will wear out, so just replace it. Water pumps and shift cables, as mentioned, seem not to last as long as you would expect. At some point the engine will need a valve job at least. But the unit body and suspension are very sturdy. The transmission seems very strong as well. I see no reason that a daily driver (not tracked) could not easily live to 200K miles.
 

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Heat I do feel is a moderate issue with these cars even stock. In the summer after stopping my car the fans would kick on in my garage for a while. Water Temp gauge never read over medium. Installed the 987/997 Third Radiator Kit (available from Suncoast for the best price I could find) since I track the car occasionally. Car NEVER kicks the fans on any more after turning the car off. So even though according to the gauge I'm not running cooler, clearly the car has benefited from the upgrade. And that's in New Hampshire!
Keep in mind that the temp gage reads 175 F over a very wide range of actual coolant temperatures.
 

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Keep in mind that the temp gage reads 175 F over a very wide range of actual coolant temperatures.
Yes it seems so! I'm used to that from other cars, but figured the Porsche gauge wasn't just a dummy indicator since it actually has temp number markers on it.
 

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Maybe I am in the minority but I fully expect my Porsche to last over 200k miles. My Lexus (my daily driver) just turned over 134k and it is running as good as the day I bought. I'm going to keep that one until 300k probably. I'm not kiddin'.

I bought my 981 for me not for a subsequent buyer so I don't care how many miles I put on it.

Modern cars should have no problem exceeding 200k miles. You just have to take care of them.
 

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I don't over-rev (nothing over say 4k RPM); ...
Please, don't do this to yourself and the car. It only starts to really come alive as you approach 4000 RPM (check the max torque range) and that is a long way from over rev. I ran my CS 06 at 4K - 5K on my highway commutes and it just sung, and went frequently to 7K (but not over) accelerating with 2nd gear. I don't mean to floor the gas pedal, but brisk acceleration. If you stay between 2.5K (under that is lugging) and 4K you will be shifting all the time and accelerate wear on the clutch. Why have the car if you don't really use it?

I am especially sensitive to the 4K RPM limit because I am following the break in procedure for my new GTS and it PAINFUL to have to shift at 4k!! Like I am driving a neutered sports car!!

I think you should follow the maintenance guidelines (except maybe more frequent oil changes at 5K intervals) and enjoy the car. Remember brake fluid every 2 years, follow the intervals for the belt, air filter and plugs. I replaced all the coils and battery 2 years ago when I got the car at 30K because small cracks were developing on the coils and the battery was original, and I didn't want to worry about being stranded. Forget about the IMS given low risk. Read (and listen on youtube) about the warning signs for when the pumps are failing, replace them then.

You have a great car. Use it.

:2cents:

PS and good luck using it only occasionally. I said the same thing. Quickly became my DD, way too much fun to ignore the Cayman in the morning and take the 3 series instead.
 

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+1 on using the Porsche water pump. The after market pumps with metal impellers can also machine the block when the bearing goes bad rendering the block un-repairable. Just shop around for the water pump at Suncoast or Sonnen, less than $300.
 

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It's a Porsche not a Chevy and 45k miles is nothing, not driving it above 4k rpms is a sin. Go drive your car, sign up for a DE, and learn what it really means to be a Porsche owner.

On a serious note, not driving the car above 4k rpms is probably worse for it than taking it to red line.
 
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