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HI,
i just got my 981 in Agate Grey and found that the body paint has those tiny swirl marks only seen under direct sun light.
May I know if this is normal for a new car? Many thanks!
 

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A particular area or all over? I have Agate Grey and no swirls. I don't think it's expected for a new vehicle.
 

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HI,
i just got my 981 in Agate Grey and found that the body paint has those tiny swirl marks only seen under direct sun light.
May I know if this is normal for a new car? Many thanks!
am afraid not-poor prep likely. I had a professional guy prep mine.
image.jpg
 

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there should be no swirl marks and it's normally from dealer prep. in fairness, there are sometimes buffer marks from the factory.

you should have them a) cut you a check to have it fixed or b) reimburse you after you have it fixed. don't trust them to fix it themselves as they will just put some shitty polish on it and buff it out and it'll be back in no time. have it fixed by a real pro.
 

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Sounds like some dummy did improper detailing job. Swirls are from buffing with incorrect compound. It is easy to fix with a high quality polish, but needs to be done right. Definitely take it back to the detailer or dealer and be like wtfmang.
 

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there should be no swirl marks and it's normally from dealer prep. in fairness, there are sometimes buffer marks from the factory.

you should have them a) cut you a check to have it fixed or b) reimburse you after you have it fixed. don't trust them to fix it themselves as they will just put some shitty polish on it and buff it out and it'll be back in no time. have it fixed by a real pro.
THIS!!!

I wouldn't trust the dealership at all. That is not their domain. Ask them who they will bring in the have it polished and find out if they are any good. Or, find someone in your area that comes highly recommended, get an estimate, submit it to the dealership and have them agree to reimburse you.

One my visits to dealership, before I took delivery, I saw a used Agate 991 on their lot. It had holograms all over the place. I pointed it out to my SA (General Sales Manager as well) as we walked by. He said they recently had the car detailed. I suggested that they never use them again...just horrid!
 

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HI,
i just got my 981 in Agate Grey and found that the body paint has those tiny swirl marks only seen under direct sun light.
May I know if this is normal for a new car? Many thanks!
It's no big deal. Sure you could repair it yourself, but why should you. This is your opportunity to get a free professional detail from your dealership. To be able to see swirl marks in gray means that someone is really incompetent.
 

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Scayden is right. Buy your own DA polisher and do a little research into polishes and polishing pads and you can quickly and safely do your own detailing. Menzera products are easy to use and produce a great finish. Nobody cares more about your car than you do....I prefer the dealership not touch the paint
 

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This is one of those few threads where I chime in with some actual advice. I have been doing corrective detailing professionally for over 16 years. Do not have the dealership fix this. They are the ones that created the problem. If you insist that they fix it, they will just hire the cheapest hack available and he will only make it worse. I can't tell you how many tens of thousands of dollars I have made fixing the dealer's "fix." Spend some time at Autopia.org Auto Detailing Forum or Auto Detailing Guide - Detailed Image and learn about the correction process. You can also find a reputable detailer in the BC area on these forums than can do a proper correction.

The dealership is not likely to foot the bill. The fact is that 95% of customers wouldn't even notice or care about the dealership's poor wash technique. They will most likely say that you caused the damage. Prepare yourself for this outcome. A good detailer will make your car look better than it did when it left the factory and provide you with education on how to maintain the finish properly.

Best of luck,
- Patrick
 

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Rupes 21 + miguires 205 +'paint gauge . Carl
Rupes is a great polisher and Megs 205 is good polish but you can't just blindly recommend this to someone as a course of action any more than you can diagnose and treat cervical cancer via text message. Not only are you asking him to purchase ~$3,000 in equipment ($400 RUPES, $200 pads, $100 polishes, $2,200 Defelsko Positector PT-200B-A) that he doesn't know how to use but worse, he could do serious damage to the paint. Megs 205 could potentially be much too aggressive based on the amount of correction required. A proper correction done by a competent detailer will involve the least aggressive method possible in the interest of preserving film thickness.

- Patrick
 
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Sounds like some dummy did improper detailing job. Swirls are from buffing with incorrect compound. It is easy to fix with a high quality polish, but needs to be done right. Definitely take it back to the detailer or dealer and be like wtfmang.
Again, not quite. Swirls are from poor washing and drying technique. Hologramming is from buffing with poor technique and/or bad products/pads. No way to tell which he has without pictures.

- Patrick
 
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Okey doke. I tried. Best of luck to the OP, and thanks for keeping me in business!

- Patrick
 

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I have been doing corrective detailing professionally for over 16 years. Do not have the dealership fix this. They are the ones that created the problem. If you insist that they fix it, they will just hire the cheapest hack available and he will only make it worse.

I agree with most of what you posted, but I think that your dealership remark is not accurate. Although there's no question that many dealerships will do as you suggest, there are others that take extraordinary care in prepping a car and my dealership is one of them. I have a black 981S and when I took delivery of my car, it was absolutely perfect. I spent at least fifteen minutes carefully examining the car for any flaws before taking delivery and there weren't any. Unfortunately I took delivery in the Spring, and by the time I drove off with my car, there was a coating of pollen on the car. But for at least 30 minutes my car was perfect.
 

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I have been doing corrective detailing professionally for over 16 years. Do not have the dealership fix this. They are the ones that created the problem. If you insist that they fix it, they will just hire the cheapest hack available and he will only make it worse.

I agree with most of what you posted, but I think that your dealership remark is not accurate. Although there's no question that many dealerships will do as you suggest, there are others that take extraordinary care in prepping a car and my dealership is one of them. I have a black 981S and when I took delivery of my car, it was absolutely perfect. I spent at least fifteen minutes carefully examining the car for any flaws before taking delivery and there weren't any. Unfortunately I took delivery in the Spring, and by the time I drove off with my car, there was a coating of pollen on the car. But for at least 30 minutes my car was perfect.
I'm glad you found the one dealership that will pay a professional to do a proper prep. I think it stands to reason that if the OP's dealer didn't care enough to prep it right, they aren't going to have the knowledge, desire or business contacts to fix it right. I can also tell you that as professional detailers go, the dealership guys are held in the lowest esteem. It isn't necessarily their (the detailer's) fault because the dealer's focus is always on profit. They continuously try to drive down the cost of the detail which forces the detailer to cut corners on time, product and process. My wife's black MB E550 was delivered looking quite well but once I got it home and stripped off the glaze wax, the true state of the finish was revealed:
10003616_10202123906794444_5207132508070776245_o.jpg

It took two consecutive three day weekends to get the whole car looking like this:

1403053_10202109595436669_6215649858661497139_o.jpg


It took three different buffers, eight pads, a $2,200 PTG, three different polishes, $600 USB microscope, several hundred dollars of various microfibers and over 60 hours to properly do the job. Paying a professional to do this would easily top $2,000 and that is if he was cutting you a really sweet deal. I guarantee that no dealership in their right mind will voluntarily take a $2,000 profit hit on every car they sell. None.

Carl44, I would never recommend that a weekender purchase all of the necessary equipment and then PRACTICE on his brand new $80,000 sports car. That's just terrible advice. If you think a professional is expensive, wait until you see what an amateur ends up costing you!

- Patrick
 
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That meter will show you total film thickness but leave you completely blind to how much clear coat is left on the car. If you are advanced enough to require a meter, you should buy a proper one i.e.

DeFelsko PT-200B-A PosiTector 200B for wood, concrete, plastic and more, Advanced 0.5 - 40 mils (200B3-E): Thickness Gauges: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

- Patrick
 

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I have been detailing cars for 35 years. I am confident that I can do a much better job than the dealership so I don't let the dealership prep my new cars. (I got into a big argument about that very subject with the sales manager at the Mercedes dealership.) That said, anytime you wash and dry a car you are going to get some swirl marks. (Use 100% cotton cloths or microfiber cloths and wash with a two bucket method to minimize swirl marks.) I live with swirls. It is a fact of life if you use your car. When I get a nice warm day and some free time I detail my car. No big deal.



As to going to the dealership and complaining or asking for a detail service, I wouldn't bother. (I might point out the swirls to the salesman or the sales manager.) Then the next time I took my car in for a service I would put a big sign on the dashboard that says, "DO NOT WASH MY CAR."
 
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