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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been driving a borrowed Cayman S to determine if I think it would be a good daily driver for me. I have a question for you experienced Cayman owners. Even though the ambient temperature is quite warm, I noticed that the temperature gauge in the Cayman S is basically pegged at just slightly to the right of the 175 mark and doesn’t really seem to move at all, no matter what the driving conditions. I am not use to this because the 996's gauge will fluctuate in accordance to the actual temperature of the coolant (i.e. in stop and go traffic it will creep further up but then go down when you get moving for a while). Does the Cayman gauge function like the 996 (and I just haven’t gotten in a situation to cause the temperature to rise above the cooling capacity of the car) or is more of an “idiot” type gauge that doesn’t show the normal fluctuations of the coolant temp?
 

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It's an actual working gauge. As each year goes by, manufactures make better attempts to keep engine temp with in a certain range.....the tighter the range the more they can work on emission and performance in that range. Twenty years ago or more all you had was a mechanical thermostat (still valid today) and a mechanical fan clutch to regulate temp......now you can have 1 or more computer driven electric fans, oil thermostats, all sort of temp sensors for both oil and coolant, etc. Once a certain coolant and oil temp is reached, various systems come into play to keep it there.
 

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had a similar question and got the same answer as Atlas gave from Porsche service dept.
 

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bet - I'd be willing to wager that the 996 you drove (or are currently driving) might have a slightly sticky thermostat, or a flaky sender. The thermostats in the 996 cars are set for 185 degrees. I've owned two type-996 cars, a 1999 Carrera, and a 2002 twin turbo and in the 8 years I owned them, the temp needle never varied more than about two widths of the needle north of the 180 degree mark on the gauge. I have pictures of the gauges I took while going through the desert SW with the ambient temperature at 114, and the needle is still the needle's width above 180 - indicating 185. The water-cooled engines used since the introduction of the Boxster are designed to keep the coolant at a constant temperature.



brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<p class="MsoNormal">I guess I should rephrase my inquiry. I don't question that the gauge is a 'working' gauge. I want to know how sensitive it is? It seems from my driving experiences thus far, the gauge is for a lack of a better term “numbed” in the middle of the temperature range, whereby it does not read fluctuations in temperature. [/quote]It appears to reach operating temperature much quicker than my 996 and then not move at all from the 175 hash mark. [/quote]Similar to how my wife’s BMW temp gauge works (once it hits the middle it is rock solid). [/quote]
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p></o:p>
<p class="MsoNormal">The Cayman S gauge is the first Porsche I have driven that did not show fluctuations. [/quote]I understand the concept of fans and such used to maintain temperature but in general this type of system relies on thermostats to operate, whereby the cooling fans kick in at one speed at X temp and operate at that speed until either the temp drops to Y whereby they shut off or the temps hit Z whereby they speed up. [/quote]The temperature range of X, Y and Z are noticed as movements on the 996 gauge (by looking at the gauge I can predict when the radiator cooling fans will kick on and off). [/quote]It appears to me that similar ranges of X, Y and Z are not noticed on the Cayman S gauge. [/quote]My original question was whether they are noticed and I just haven’t utilized the car in such a manner to hit the various ranges or whether the gauge is not sensitive enough once at operating temperature to register such changes? [/quote]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
<blockquote id="quote">quote:<hr noshade="" height="1" id="quote" />
bet - I'd be willing to wager that the 996 you drove (or are currently driving) might have a slightly sticky thermostat, or a flaky sender. The thermostats in the 996 cars are set for 185 degrees. I've owned two type-996 cars, a 1999 Carrera, and a 2002 twin turbo and in the 8 years I owned them, the temp needle never varied more than about two widths of the needle north of the 180 degree mark on the gauge. I have pictures of the gauges I took while going through the desert SW with the ambient temperature at 114, and the needle is still the needle's width above 180 - indicating 185. The water-cooled engines used since the introduction of the Boxster are designed to keep the coolant at a constant temperature.<hr noshade="" height="1" id="quote" />
</blockquote>



My needle doesn't fluctuate wildly. The maximum movement is as you discribed about two widths of the needle. In my experience with my 996 (2001 - for 3 years) and two other frequently driven 996's (1999 & 2003), if you set in slow moving traffic on hot days in construction zones (ambient temps in the 90's) you will see the gauge creep about a needles width hotter and then when you hit highway speeds in open road again you will see it drop about a needles width. At highway speeds (assuming you are not stuck on the bumper of someone) no matter what the ambient temp is there is no movement in the needle. A previous Boxster (2000) I owned had the samy type of mvement. You could even predict from the location of the temp needle when the side exhaust fan would kick on in the Boxster and when it would kick off. Edited by - bet on 08/23/2006 10:13:26 AM

Edited by - bet on 08/23/2006 10:17:13 AM
 

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Brian - I have had my Cayman since March, driven it under extremely hot conditions - let it sit at an idle for 20 minutes in 105 degrees in the Nevada desert last week on a trip back to home to Las Vegas while waiting for a pilot car to take a line of us through a one-lane portion of US 95, and the needle didn't budge. Yes, the coolant comes up to temperature a little faster than either of my 996s did (and that shouldn't be confused with the oil temperature, for which the Cayman has no gauge), but I don't think it's anything to worry about - I hear the fans go off and on all the time. I guess they've done a nice job of engineering this - I can say the radiators on the Cayman are just about as big as the ones that were on my 996 turbo.



brad
 

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Mine has gone up almost to red. After agood Ortega runinto slow traffic in Lake Elsinore on what was probably the hottest day of the year. Carshowed 108-111 outside. Turned off A/C and it went down.
 

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Brian


Interested in your impressions, give me a call. 1st track day w/the CS this Sat. I'll be interested in how she does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dan,



I will call you after your track day as I would like to hear your impressions from the track also. Hey any thoughts on the temp gauge?



[Edited for grammar/spelling]



Edited by - bet on 08/24/2006 06:43:11 AM

Edited by - bet on 08/24/2006 06:44:19 AM
 

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Dan,



I'll also be interested to know your impressions from your first track experience with the CS. I'll finally do a track day with mine at Heartland Park in October since I'm going to go to the Croctoberfest. Up until now, and til then, I've only at it on AX courses.



brad
 
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