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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering how reliable the stock kit is and if the solution has an expiry. Mine hasn't been used for 4 years and maybe 10.

Or do you guys carry a separate solution?

I caught a youtube vid of someone trying to use it and maybe he didn't do it correctly despite following the instructions but regardless, it wasn't effective in sealing the puncture and e had to have it towed back. Kinda silly for a simple tire puncture.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
ok.... just checked mine which expires in june this year.

Still wondering if anyone has found a better and easier solution if the need arises.
 

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I keep a scissor jack and lug wrench in the car and I have another wheel with mounted tire that I carry in another car when going to events. Working on a frunk solution to fit that full size spare, but it's tight.

I've been shopping around for Touareg donut spares, as these should be narrow enough to fit and large enough to clear the brakes.

There are actual spare wheel options available for these cars that fit in the trunk of the Boxster and Cayman. It's a folded/deflated tire, so you just need to fill it with the air pump.

1582286500046.png


I don't trust the quick patch kits. Swapping a wheel is so much quicker and less involved than patching a tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I keep a scissor jack and lug wrench in the car and I have another wheel with mounted tire that I carry in another car when going to events. Working on a frunk solution to fit that full size spare, but it's tight.

I've been shopping around for Touareg donut spares, as these should be narrow enough to fit and large enough to clear the brakes.

There are actual spare wheel options available for these cars that fit in the trunk of the Boxster and Cayman. It's a folded/deflated tire, so you just need to fill it with the air pump.

View attachment 267081

I don't trust the quick patch kits. Swapping a wheel is so much quicker and less involved than patching a tire.
Thanks. The folded/deflated spare... it can be pumped up with the stock air pump? Have you got a link to where I can get one?
 

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It's supposed to be inflatable with the stock air pump.
Double check this is the right kit for your model year. Cayman Spare Tire Kit

Pricey... Which is why I've gone the route of a $100 Porsche wheel with a real tire on it.
 

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I had two flats last year :confused:.

The first one I used the 15 year old tire seal that came with the car (05 987.1). I think it helped (The nail was still in the tire so it may have been a slow leak without the goop). Luckily I was only 4 miles from a tire store. After the drive I had a stream of that goop on the inside of the wheel well. This gave me an excuse to upgrade all 4 tires (which I was planning on doing anyway).

They guy at the tire store says the goop works pretty good if you have a simple puncture.

The second flat I found in my garage after running over something the day before. The nail went through the tread but was long enough to damage the sidewall inside. Thank goodness I bought replacement tire insurance. Took the wheel off and had the tire replaced.

I purchased new goop from Pelican. The factory pump is OK, but the one I got from Harbor Freight (IIRC, for $40) for AutoX was much better.
 

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Read this thread - post #3 is what I carry.

The only way I’d use the “ goop “ that‘s included in the car is a “ last resort measure “.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the replies. I live in a really small place so perhaps I'll just keep a spare and get a cab back home to get the spare. The AAA is still a hassle for me as I still need to get the wheel to the repair shop and back and AAA won;t do that here I dont think. So, I still need to get a jack as my other ride is on RFT and doesn't come with a jack as well.

What I'm concerned about is if I do decide to cross the border on my own. So far I've only done that on dealer organized breakfast drives and there is a support vehicle that can take care of small stuff like that. Will have a look a all the suggestions above.
 

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Amazing what car mfg. do to cut cost, weight and increase space in cars. Air pumps and sealant cans. Who would think a collapsible spare, aka donut, would be something you would want. I guess the early Boxster spares would be too old now to use. My first 2000 Boxster came with one that fit in the frunk,
 

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wmclarenf1, is it possible to improve your towing coverage to tow you to nearest shop/repair centre?
and/or buy coverage for your trips to Malaysia.

if its an option, may be worth it - rather than worrying about kits/jacks/etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
wmclarenf1, is it possible to improve your towing coverage to tow you to nearest shop/repair centre?
and/or buy coverage for your trips to Malaysia.

if its an option, may be worth it - rather than worrying about kits/jacks/etc.
I think I'll go with the spare tire which I'll leave in the garden shed. It'll be a lot faster than waiting for any tow truck.

Extended towing to Malaysia.. I can just imagine the wait.
Probably best to be able to change it on the spot in maybe 30 to 45 minutes and look for the closest tire shop.

Is extended towing your solution for interstate driving?
 

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Obviously YMMV - its not just about the spare but the right jack (most scissor style car jacks can't fit), tyre iron and trying to do a repair at the side of a busy highway has its own risks.

Taking an uber/grab back to your house & back may not be the ideal solution unless you plan to carry the kit around with you.

extended towing in this context includes flatbed truck services and covers more than just flats.
an example where that is useful - my friend had an issue with a sensor while on the road that caused power to be restricted and not easy to find a shop out there to fix it. he was 400kms (250 miles) from home.

The other is availability of tyres at the local area stores (if you need a replacement) - they might not have stock of the tyre that you want e.g brand/size/N spec, etc.

no right or wrong answer, just what is right for you...
 

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Thanks for all the replies. I live in a really small place so perhaps I'll just keep a spare and get a cab back home to get the spare. The AAA is still a hassle for me as I still need to get the wheel to the repair shop and back and AAA won;t do that here I dont think. So, I still need to get a jack as my other ride is on RFT and doesn't come with a jack as well.

What I'm concerned about is if I do decide to cross the border on my own. So far I've only done that on dealer organized breakfast drives and there is a support vehicle that can take care of small stuff like that. Will have a look a all the suggestions above.
I don’t have a perfect solution but I bought a factory jack with the foam holder from an earlier 986 or 987 when they still came with jacks and spares. I found one on e-bay for $70 and the factory jack is aluminum and fits the 981 jack point. I also bought a expandable lug wrench and a can of fix-a-flat. I feel this gives me options if I get a flat. I have had good results with fix-a-flat on my truck as it can inflate and seal some flats and get you to a shop for a permanent repair. You may have to top off the air with the factory compressor but the Fix-a-flat can inflate the tire on it’s own. If you have a more severe flat the jack will allow you to remove the tire and get a ride or call Uber to take it to a tire shop. It’s also nice to have a jack for other roadside repairs. A nice bonus is that the aluminum jack does not add much weight to the car and with the foam holder it partially slides back and fits in the recessed area in the rear trunk and does not take up much space and does not slide around.
I haven't plugged a tire since my my first job at the Standard Oil full service gas station in 1970 but I think I will also get a tire plug kit to add to my flat tire road side repair options.:)
267106
 

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Just wondering how reliable the stock kit is and if the solution has an expiry. Mine hasn't been used for 4 years and maybe 10.

Or do you guys carry a separate solution?

I caught a youtube vid of someone trying to use it and maybe he didn't do it correctly despite following the instructions but regardless, it wasn't effective in sealing the puncture and e had to have it towed back. Kinda silly for a simple tire puncture.
I bought tire sealant plugs, tool to insert them, and a pair of pliers to remove nail (etc.). My intent is to find the culprit, remove it with pliers, and seal tire with plug before pumping it up with the car pump. I have yet to try this out but a friend said it worked for him.
 

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Just wondering how reliable the stock kit is and if the solution has an expiry. Mine hasn't been used for 4 years and maybe 10.

Or do you guys carry a separate solution?

I caught a youtube vid of someone trying to use it and maybe he didn't do it correctly despite following the instructions but regardless, it wasn't effective in sealing the puncture and e had to have it towed back. Kinda silly for a simple tire puncture.
Got a spare with jack kit from an earlier version of a 986. Aside from that, I keep a membership in AAA.
 

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I bought tire sealant plugs, tool to insert them, and a pair of pliers to remove nail (etc.). My intent is to find the culprit, remove it with pliers, and seal tire with plug before pumping it up with the car pump. I have yet to try this out but a friend said it worked for him.
Basically the same as the stock patch kit, it's entirely under the assumption that you get a simple puncture in the center of your tread. What if it's a puncture into the side wall? What if it's the more likely outcome on a car like these, and a literal blowout from heat and stress?
Nine times out of ten, people aren't even aware of objects stuck into the tread in their tire until they notice the slow leak. In most cases, you can just air it up and be safe to drive it home.

To that point, why not just get run-flat tires so you can make it a few extra miles?

Manufactures are just trying to save cargo space for brochure bragging rights and save weight for fuel economy. I'd rather run on a half size donut than risk a roadside DIY patch job failing and damaging my wheel or other surrounding components.

Aside from that, I keep a membership in AAA.
This is definitely a regional thing, but most of our local mountain roads are without cell signal. AAA works great for people in more populated areas, but towing and road side services around my area have an average of 2+ hour response time and that's assuming you even have signal to contact them.

Statistic show that most people never have to touch these patch kits or their spare, and that's great. But when problems do occur, it's never convenient. Just my opinion, but if you're driving public roads (which anyone worried about carrying a spare likely is), then you should be prepared for the worst possible outcome. Secluded area, no cell signal, at night, in the rain, with a non-repairable tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Basically the same as the stock patch kit, it's entirely under the assumption that you get a simple puncture in the center of your tread. What if it's a puncture into the side wall? What if it's the more likely outcome on a car like these, and a literal blowout from heat and stress?
Nine times out of ten, people aren't even aware of objects stuck into the tread in their tire until they notice the slow leak. In most cases, you can just air it up and be safe to drive it home.

To that point, why not just get run-flat tires so you can make it a few extra miles?

Manufactures are just trying to save cargo space for brochure bragging rights and save weight for fuel economy. I'd rather run on a half size donut than risk a roadside DIY patch job failing and damaging my wheel or other surrounding components.


This is definitely a regional thing, but most of our local mountain roads are without cell signal. AAA works great for people in more populated areas, but towing and road side services around my area have an average of 2+ hour response time and that's assuming you even have signal to contact them.

Statistic show that most people never have to touch these patch kits or their spare, and that's great. But when problems do occur, it's never convenient. Just my opinion, but if you're driving public roads (which anyone worried about carrying a spare likely is), then you should be prepared for the worst possible outcome. Secluded area, no cell signal, at night, in the rain, with a non-repairable tire.
I did think about RFTs actually but I believe there is a big tradeoff in handling from what I read. Not sure I want to give up handling for this car.
 

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I did think about RFTs actually but I believe there is a big tradeoff in handling from what I read. Not sure I want to give up handling for this car.
A valid point for track and autocross; you'd ideally be tossing out more than just the spare in those circumstances. But if you're pushing the car to an extent where that level of handling is a concern on the road, then you're driving to a point with zero margin for error (which I would not advise anywhere but a track).

Swap out the vacuum pump and bottle of goop for an equal weight aluminum scissor jack.
Then a half size donut spare up front would have a total weight that is less than the difference of a full-to-empty tank of gas.

So unless you're concerned about the handling differences between various fuel levels, a spare wouldn't feel much different...

Edit: I'm not trying to spark debate, as I totally get where you're coming from. My butt is dialed into feeling the differences that 1psi tire pressure can change, so weight additions, distributions, and aero adjustments matter greatly to me. When I get to event, weight comes out. But driving through the mountains to an event with a frunk loaded with 30+lbs of camera gear, I've never thought handling was sacrificed.
 

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I've heard some people suggest carrying folded/deflated spares or donut spares. Just keep in mind that you still need to fit your full-size wheel & tire (with the flat) back into the car, unless you plan to leave it on the side of the road. That's not really feasible with my Boxster, unless I'm driving solo, and can put the full-size wheel/tire into a bag, belt it to the passenger seat. :)
 
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