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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen several threads about mounting a trailer hitch on Caymans to tow a tire trailer. Pretty elaborate mounting.

Is it possible to mount a trailer hitch that screws into the rear tow hook mount? Anybody hear of such a thing? Would it work?

Please advise. Thanks.
 

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I have seen several threads about mounting a trailer hitch on Caymans to tow a tire trailer. Pretty elaborate mounting.

Is it possible to mount a trailer hitch that screws into the rear tow hook mount? Anybody hear of such a thing? Would it work?

Please advise. Thanks.
No. Won't work.

Rear tow ring is for pulling your Cayman out of the weeds and not much else. Do it the other way. Everything will be hidden by the license plate when you are not using the hitch.

The biggest problem is finding a good tire trailer. No one makes them anymore.
 

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Yes, I made a tow hook mount of such description this past spring. I took a tow hook, cut off the end and welded a bolt head to it, then mounted a 1 and1/4" receiver to a flat plate which I bolted to the original tow hook unit using the modified tow hook in the center and longer bolts replacing the original two side bolts. I used the unit all this summer and fall towing my small utility trailer with tires and tools with no problems. Mounting the receiver this way was quicker, less work and less intrusive on the original bumber set-up. I have a flip up tag bracket which coneals the unit. If you want more info let me know and I will take some photos of the finish product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I made a tow hook mount of such description this past spring. I took a tow hook, cut off the end and welded a bolt head to it, then mounted a 1 and1/4" receiver to a flat plate which I bolted to the original tow hook unit using the modified tow hook in the center and longer bolts replacing the original two side bolts. I used the unit all this summer and fall towing my small utility trailer with tires and tools with no problems. Mounting the receiver this way was quicker, less work and less intrusive on the original bumber set-up. I have a flip up tag bracket which coneals the unit. If you want more info let me know and I will take some photos of the finish product.
Absolutely would like to see pix and any details. I already own a tire trailer from my previous existence as a Z06 owner. Thanks.
 

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Yes, I made a tow hook mount of such description this past spring. I took a tow hook, cut off the end and welded a bolt head to it, then mounted a 1 and1/4" receiver to a flat plate which I bolted to the original tow hook unit using the modified tow hook in the center and longer bolts replacing the original two side bolts. I used the unit all this summer and fall towing my small utility trailer with tires and tools with no problems. Mounting the receiver this way was quicker, less work and less intrusive on the original bumber set-up. I have a flip up tag bracket which coneals the unit. If you want more info let me know and I will take some photos of the finish product.
I definitely want to see pictures of this as well. My first thought when I read the thread title was "Are you kidding? That would be nuts!" However if you made it work, I would sure like to see how.

How does the trailer tow behind the car? Wouldn't be off to one side?
 

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That sure would be interesting! I also thought it would be nuts. I am willing to learn new tricks.
 

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If you have an engineering background, and take apart the existing Cayman bumper (such as to install a hitch kit from "Mike Foxtrot") you will quickly realize that the tow hook attachment is not designed for extended application of forces. The tow hook screws into a block of aluminum, which then bolts to the structural bumper with two bolts. It's fine for those rare, straight pulls out of the weeds or a gravel pit. But it is not designed to handle side loads or rotational forces (twisting as when you screw in/out the tow hook), or vibrational forces.

I would never even consider using this for the 60-200 mile (one way) trailer pulls that I regularly take at 75MPH to events around here. Heck, I wouldn't even do that to pull my tiny Harbor Freight trailer around the block at 25MPH!

If you decide to tow a small autocross trailer using this mounting, keep speeds low (say <45MPH), distances short (<20 miles), and stay off of all rough/bumpy roads. Then, by all means, let all of your autocross and track-rat friends know not to follow you too closely. They aren't going to want to be any where near you when your trailer decides to "go solo" as a result of a hitch mounting failure!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you have an engineering background, and take apart the existing Cayman bumper (such as to install a hitch kit from "Mike Foxtrot") you will quickly realize that the tow hook attachment is not designed for extended application of forces. The tow hook screws into a block of aluminum, which then bolts to the structural bumper with two bolts. It's fine for those rare, straight pulls out of the weeds or a gravel pit. But it is not designed to handle side loads or rotational forces (twisting as when you screw in/out the tow hook), or vibrational forces.

I would never even consider using this for the 60-200 mile (one way) trailer pulls that I regularly take at 75MPH to events around here. Heck, I wouldn't even do that to pull my tiny Harbor Freight trailer around the block at 25MPH!

If you decide to tow a small autocross trailer using this mounting, keep speeds low (say <45MPH), distances short (<20 miles), and stay off of all rough/bumpy roads. Then, by all means, let all of your autocross and track-rat friends know not to follow you too closely. They aren't going to want to be any where near you when your trailer decides to "go solo" as a result of a hitch mounting failure!
I certainly do not know, but it seems a hook designed to pull a 3000 pound car out of a gravel pit and tow it to the pits could likely handle a 600 pound trailer. I realize in towing there are dynamic forces other than a constant pull like a winch would make, but I sure would like to see how dizziedazzo did it and make my own evaluation.
 

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I'm currently working on creating my own hitch. It will be very similar to what's already been done but I will be using a receiver that is meant to bolt to a truck step bumper and bolting that inside my bumper. My total cost (if I can make it work) is going to be about $150. I've already bought all the parts.

I'm not sure I believe the tow hook mount can support towing but the crushable bumper support tubes have already proven to be a failure point. Those have to be upgraded. For someone that has a welder I would just buy a piece of 2" receiver tube and weld a mounting flange around it to bolt to the bumper.
 

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For those so-called engineers, my system is no different than what has been used by the other fabricators for a tow hitch, including the Wilwood system. The tow hook bolt and plate sandwich the bumber "I" beam. My system is only pulling less than two hundred pounds including the trailer weight. As someone said earlier, the tow hook is used to pull a 3100 lbs. vehicle vs a 200 lbs. trailer. Also the trailer is balanced with its load to give it just enough tongue weight to enable to trailer to track correctly. Wait and look at the photos and get a complete understanding of what was done before you give your "expert" analysis. I have done this type of set-up with numerous other sport-car vehicles, towed tire trailers to hundreds of track and autocross events without any issues.
 

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I really do want to see your setup. My concern would be that one bolt isn't enough to handle the load. You sight Willwood as an example. When I first looked at his hitches I thought they were skimpy but he has 4 bolts sharing the load.

And just in case you didn't catch what I said before, someone here has had the bumper mount crush tubes fail from towing a trailer. It has been shown that they cannot support the weight of a trailer for too long. While I like the idea of not having to tear the whole rear of my car apart to make a hitch, those need to be replaced.
 

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I also am REALLY interested in seeing those pics. I am no engineer, but I do want to see it.
 

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I went with the Mike version, sandwiched plates on the bar, 2 tow cable hook up points, upgraded mount tubes, 12.9 grade bolts put in with red locktight.

I also had a custom trailer made with a totally loaded weight about 500 pounds.

I will pick it up in 2 weeks, then let do an article about it..

I was told by a CHP officer to go with a stable and high quality built trailer. He could not stress this enough. Stated that he has seen Many of the cheap few hundred $ trailers laying along side the road, or damaging the vehicle pulling it...
 

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I went with the Mike version, sandwiched plates on the bar, 2 tow cable hook up points, upgraded mount tubes, 12.9 grade bolts put in with red locktight.

I also had a custom trailer made with a totally loaded weight about 500 pounds.

I will pick it up in 2 weeks, then let do an article about it..

I was told by a CHP officer to go with a stable and high quality built trailer. He could not stress this enough. Stated that he has seen Many of the cheap few hundred $ trailers laying along side the road, or damaging the vehicle pulling it...
I for one am very interested in hearing about your trailer...and the hitch. If I get a custom one, I'm going to try for something that can stand up vertically in the garage when not in use. If that's not doable, I'll get one that can morph into a work bench!? :dance:
 

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I for one am very interested in hearing about your trailer...and the hitch. If I get a custom one, I'm going to try for something that can stand up vertically in the garage when not in use. If that's not doable, I'll get one that can morph into a work bench!? :dance:
Great idea either way!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Dizzie--any more info on your hitch? I am very curious, as are others.

Thanks.
 

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Here are the photos of the hitch. I welded a 11/4" receiver to a flat plate which sits in the middle, indented part of the i-beam bumper rail. There are three bolts, the large center "tow" bolt in the middle of the receiver box, and two bolts on each side of the box. All three bolt to the plate on the back side of bumper rail as in the original set up where the tow hook bolted up. My trailer was obtained through Harbor Freight and after it was bolted together, all of the rail joints were spot welded. With four wheels and tires and tool box with floor jack and tools and such the tongue weight is about 19 lbs. As stated before, there are three bolts securing the receiver plate which in turn rests on the bumper lip. The trailer otws without any problems.
 

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Not to be a buzz-kill or anything, but where do you attach the safety chains?

I'm pretty sure it's illegal (at least in MD) to tow without safety chains connecting the car and the trailer, in addition to the tow hitch.
 

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^Good question. This needs to be answered.
 
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