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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my 718 Boxster S for 9 months now and I've enjoyed it on the road immensely. Now, I want to take things up a notch and I'll be going on my first track day this week! I had a few questions for our learned track warriors.

1. Is there any type of check premandated by Porsche before taking the car on the track to avoid compromising the waranty. If not do I have to notify them of my intention to take the car on track beforehand?
2. Is there any preparation that has to be done to the car before the event?
2. I'm a novice at the track, any advice to help me stay safe whilst making the most of the day and enjoying it. I did some homework on the track including breaking zones and racing lines. I've only driven on this track once before and it was in a very heavy M6.

Thanks a million to all that can help in advance!
 

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I've had my 718 Boxster S for 9 months now and I've enjoyed it on the road immensely. Now, I want to take things up a notch and I'll be going on my first track day this week! I had a few questions for our learned track warriors.

1. Is there any type of check premandated by Porsche before taking the car on the track to avoid compromising the waranty. If not do I have to notify them of my intention to take the car on track beforehand?
2. Is there any preparation that has to be done to the car before the event?
2. I'm a novice at the track, any advice to help me stay safe whilst making the most of the day and enjoying it. I did some homework on the track including breaking zones and racing lines. I've only driven on this track once before and it was in a very heavy M6.

Thanks a million to all that can help in advance!
I suggest you go to forum link below which will answer most of your questions and will be quite informative. It is for the 981 but will apply to the 718 as well:
981 Cayman and Boxster Competition

Simply use the "Search " option within this forum to answer your specific questions about track prep, insurance considerations, etc.
 

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OP, you are in Doha and what works here in U.S. might not be the same as in Doha. Anyway, briefly:

1. Yes, organizer of the driving school (track weekend) requires that the vehicle be inspected before it shows up on the track. Usually, the club in question has form to download and give to the mechanic/dealer.

2. Yes, see point 1. The most important part is to replace brake fluid and flush the system. At least here, they will not let you run if brake fluid is older than 6 months.

3. To stay safe, do not do anything unless you are 98.5% sure it will end well. The number is invented, what it wants to say is that you have to get out of your comfort zone if you want to learn, but those excursions should be with very small steps. Don't pay attention/care what anybody else is doing on track - do your thing and forget about others. This is especially important if there is another Boxster S running with you and passing you like if you were standing still. Don't let it excite you and start driving past your capabilities. For all you know, this could be Fernando Alonso just making fun out of all of you present on the track. Even if driven by nobody famous, you have zero knowledge what modifications are there on the car - do not assume that it is the same car just because there is "718 Boxster S" badge on the rear of the car.

Have fun!
 
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Good advice above. Will you have an instructor/ coach for the event? If not hire one. A 718S is a very capable car. Focus on following instructions and being open to learn. Try to relax and set your ego aside- we all were beginners once. Stay hydrated. Have fun!
 

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The 718 is pretty damn easy to drive on a track. Leave PSM on and when it lights you up, dial back your speed 50%. All I did was Cup2 tires and a track pad, just to give confidence with the car when it was hot.

Turning off PSM in a car with that much power will be a lot faster, but will also spin the wheels more. Put 1000 laps under your belt before going there. I like the Boxster 2.7L because you can be pedal to the floor but never lose traction (and it’s 350 pounds lighter).


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(1) Your car is "new" however ensure it is in tip top shape - check water level, oil level and brake fluid reservoir (in frunk) for correct levels (refer to manual if in doubt). Check brake pads for wear. Very important - check tires for wear and tear - replace tires if excessively worn, do not run on plugged tires. Check your tire pressures - start at the minimum recommended cold pressure (unless the track is wet!).

(2) Make sure you are prepared - have or purchase a good light weight helmet that is correctly fitted e.g. it should be tight enough that when you twist the helmet it twists the the skin on your forehead, also if you rock the helmet back and forth it should move the skin on your forehead backwards and forwards. As a minimum wear a long sleeved cotton t- shirt or shirt, long cotton pants and driving shoes. Make sure you are fully hydrated and take plenty of fluid and snacks to the track with you.

(3) Before going to the track, view the track in google earth or similar - understand its rough lay out. At the track seek a briefing from an instructor (preferably go out with an instructor). Before going onto the track remove all lose items from the car (they become deadly missiles when you have an off) Concentrate on very simple things - where is the line, where are the basic braking points, where are the sighting markers e.g. distance markers.

(4) . Keep it simple - one warm up lap followed by 3-5 hot laps followed by a cool down lap. Go to pits. Check car fluids and tire pressures - if too hot let the tires down with a pressure gauge. Rinse and repeat. Stay focussed understand the do's and don'ts e.g. both indicator lights on for cool down lap, wave through protocol etc.

(5) Do not get suckered into chasing the faster cars :)

(6) As soon as you feel tired - call it a day, don't get suckered into one more lap

(7) Enjoy yourself and know when to quit.

(8) . Most people can drive cars round a track quickly - but only after they have had tuition and lots of seat time. Never underestimate this and never overestimate your abilities. First and foremost learn to be accurate e.g. line and braking points - become consistent and ultimately increase the pace.

oh and transitions - moving from left to right or right to left have "soft" hands e.g. smooth not jerky or aggressive.
 

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I assume the organizer will have instructors for a novice group. If so, just relax and follow his instructions. Relax?? Yeah, make sure to take deep breaths, don't hold the steering wheel in a death grip. His first goals are to show you the correct school line (the safest) around the course, make sure you use the mirrors and develop a good sense of what's around you, to look far up the track (the car will go where your eyes are looking,)

If they don't provide instructors and you can't hire one, don't go.

Hope it works out!!
 

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One very important fact that instructors often don't tell you about: When you are in a tight corner at a speed that you think is too high, DO NOT HIT YOUR BRAKES. That will cause the car's weight to be shifted to the front, unweighting the back. With less weight holding it down, the rear end might snap around with oversteer and could put you into a spin. BAD.

First, modulate your speed BEFORE getting into a corner. Once in, if you think you're carrying too much speed, ease off on the throttle. If you still want to slow down, use light force on the brake pedal.

Talk about this with your instructor before getting on the track. As him to alert you in advance of corners and tell you how to drive them

One last tip: Even if it makes you late getting on track, thoroughly adjust the communicator. It should be secure and comfortable. The volume is often too high, so you and the instructor sort it out before getting on the track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
WOW! Loads of great advice. Sounds a little bit more complicated than I thought. I'm already working on hiring an instructor to go out with me. I've already driven on this track with an instructor in an M6, but he didn't go into the amount of detail I'm getting from you guys over here. What kind of helmet is best open face or full face, what are your experiences, please?
 

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What kind of helmet is best open face or full face, what are your experiences, please?
It is the same thing. Some of them are forced choices. If you drive an open wheel racer, you will have to have full face helmet. I would recommend the same for karting. However, in a closed vehicle, it really is your choice, some people prefer the feel of protected chin with full face, some like air cooling them through open windows with open face - very little chance of that in Doha, though :)

Let's put it this way, if unsure where will this bring you, get an open face helmet. They are reasonably priced and easier all-around to mess with (sunglasses, prescription glasses, communication equipment...). If you get bitten and bitten hard, then go for a full face. Even then, there are good full face helmets (to protect you) that are very reasonably priced and it goes up and up and up from there - just like from Base Cayman to GT3 RSR :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It is the same thing. Some of them are forced choices. If you drive an open wheel racer, you will have to have full face helmet. I would recommend the same for karting. However, in a closed vehicle, it really is your choice, some people prefer the feel of protected chin with full face, some like air cooling them through open windows with open face - very little chance of that in Doha, though :)

Let's put it this way, if unsure where will this bring you, get an open face helmet. They are reasonably priced and easier all-around to mess with (sunglasses, prescription glasses, communication equipment...). If you get bitten and bitten hard, then go for a full face. Even then, there are good full face helmets (to protect you) that are very reasonably priced and it goes up and up and up from there - just like from Base Cayman to GT3 RSR :)
Thanks very much, that makes a lot of sense. Although I would love to go to the track regularly, there isn't much of an opportunity to do that here with only one track day at the local circuit per month (and only in the winter months, the track closes in the summer). So investing in a really high-end helmet will be a bit of a waste especially if a similar level of protection can be achieved with a more reasonable product. I decided to hire one for my next track day and I'll go helmet shopping when I'm in London next month where the choice is much wider and the prices more reasonable. From what I heard so far I'm leaning toward an open face especially as I wear prescription glasses. Thanks again for your advice. ??
 

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WOW! Loads of great advice. Sounds a little bit more complicated than I thought. I'm already working on hiring an instructor to go out with me. I've already driven on this track with an instructor in an M6, but he didn't go into the amount of detail I'm getting from you guys over here. What kind of helmet is best open face or full face, what are your experiences, please?
Full face, and light - weight - you won't have HANS and you will have air bags thus the lighter the better :) Bell, Arai, Stilo are great - do not get a motor bike helmet. Also worth getting a set of race driving gloves - they stop you over gripping :)

I wear prescription glasses and use a Bell Mag1 Rally open face helmet - open face is definitely better (from a safety POV).
 

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I decided to hire one for my next track day and I'll go helmet shopping when I'm in London next month where the choice is much wider and the prices more reasonable. From what I heard so far I'm leaning toward an open face especially as I wear prescription glasses. Thanks again for your advice. 
You are very welcome. Two more things:

1. If you hire a helmet, I would at least buy a head sock/balaclava. Not to protect you from the fire, but from whatever is inside that hired helmet :) Just a suggestion, not a necessity.

2. At least in U.S., new Bell lineup (SNELL 2015) has a guide inside the cheek foam to very, very easily slide in your glasses after you put on your helmet - provided the glasses have straight piece of the frame that goes behind the ear. That is on closed face helmet. So, when in London, you can also check Bell closed face helmets and see if you can slide in your glasses. I tried M8 model (very reasonably priced) and you can certainly do that very easily.

Good luck!
 

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Remember that nobody "wins" a trackday. Nobody remembers who was fastest or slowest or who braked the latest, but EVERYONE remembers the guy that put his car into the wall. Don't be that guy.
 
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