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Discussion Starter #1
Do you guys know whether it's ok to track a 981 on the initial oil fill? I'll be coming up on the end of my break-in period soon and I'll be looking to do some events. Everyone swears there is no need to change the oil at 2000 miles, but I didn't know whether the rules changed a little bit if you were planning on tracking or driving your car very hard.

Also, what is the given procedure for changing pad compounds on this car? I know when it comes to track oriented brake pads, some compounds don't place nice with other (street) compounds. Can I just put track pads on and go with this car or is there some sort of bed-in procedure I should follow when switching pads?

My previous sports car was an S2000 and some guys would go so far as to match brake pads to a certain set of rotors and change both every time they went to the track.

Thanks!
 

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I switch to Carbotech pads for the track and I bedded them before the first use, but not after that.

There's no benefit to tracking on old oil, but if by break in you mean 2k miles, I don't see an issue tracking with that. Although I did change mine at that point before I went to the track. That $100 just gave me a mental comfort margin. I wouldn't use oil older than 4k miles on the track.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is just something that makes me a bit nervous about wringing a car out on a track for extended periods of time on the initial oil fill.
 
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When I was in a similar situation I decided to change the oil before the first track weekend just to be safe. You would probably be fine without changing but why risk it? I swap factory pads with Pagid Yellow/Black and have not observed any compound mixing issues in the change-over. I usually make a few hard stops (in a vacant area) to bed the pads or if I'm changing them at the track I just take it easy for a couple of laps.
 

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Spend the $300, get it changed at a dealership. It'll take you 2 hours and it will give you piece of mind.

HONESTLY you'd probably be fine on the original oil, but...I'd be feeling the same way you are. I would get the oil changed just to make me feel better
 
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I was in the same situation this last week. 2 track days one after the other. I didn't change mine, had the car inspected and they said don't bother changing. Likewise another thread on this forum someone recommended the same.

http://www.planet-9.com/987-cayman-boxster-competition/107549-hpdes-fluids.html#/forumsite/21136

I have another track day now coming up in 2 weeks, wondering if I should now do the changing before or after that. I do not have the space or lighting to properly inspect the car myself at home. Oil levels look good still but that's just levels.
 

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There is just something that makes me a bit nervous about wringing a car out on a track for extended periods of time on the initial oil fill.
You are going to get polarizing opinions on this topic.

There is probably an inadequate amount of empirical data that supports an early oil change vs following the maintenance schedule for modern day cars. That is simply because no one is running isolated experiments and driving these type of cars to the ground and comparing the longevity of both vehicles.

Most people who do an early oil change, want "peace of mind" for several hundred dollars. Other people think it's a complete waste of money, given modern day tolerances in manufacturing.

I see little incentive for the manufacturer to give you a mainteance schedule that would diminish the life of your car.

This topic along with should you bother with the break in period is going to be highly subjective. Some people beat on their car during an European Delivery. Some people follow less than 4000 rpm for the first 2000 miles.

You can see that with all these variables at play, I've never really heard of anyone able to prove that following any of these methods have yielded a more durable or less durable car.

So do whatever makes you happy.
 

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I suspect that both the synthetic oil manufacturers and automobile manufacturers have tested their claims. And I agree that there is little incentive to have them publish recommendations that diminish value.
 

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The one thing I think we need to keep in mind in this discussion is we're talking about track usage - high RPMs for an extended period of time. While I agree that there is little chance that the oil would be worn-out after 2000 miles on the street, I would worry about any contamination that might have occurred in the oil during break-in. There probably wouldn't be any immediate effects, but long term who knows? I do my own oil changes so for me it was under $100 for oil and filter. I guess if I was faced with $300 out of pocket, I might reconsider.

FWIW, I always change oil after two track weekends and I keep an eye on oil temps to make sure they never get too close to 300F. I blew an engine on track in my 987 and it was an expensive rebuild so now I err on the side of caution.
 

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I agree with Mr_Brown. Changing the oil is always a smart thing to do. The longer the oil is in the car, the more it breaks down, and the lower the viscosity becomes. I dumped mine around 2,500 before a track day after 2,000 miles in Europe. The first 1,000 was easy, but we definitely had some on the second 1,000 while in Europe. There were some good revs, but they never lasted for long. The track is a totally different animal. The engine runs hot for 90 minutes a day at a constant 4,000 to 7,880 rpms in sports plus and you do this for one or two days on the weekend. Oil temps get above 250 and this puts a lot of stress on the motor. Fresh oil for your first track day and changing every four track days thereafter sounds like a good regiment to me. Maybe you can find an indy to do the oil change for two bills instead of three. Just a thought.
 

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Yu can swap OEM to Pagid Yellows at will, never heard of an issue
I hear that the noise is pretty bad for regular street use?

Also does anyone know that if this oil filter is compatible with the Cayman GTS?
Amazon.com: MAHLE Original OX 366D Oil Filter: Automotive
Amazon says it is not. But couple of other places offer the same part (http://www.schnellautosports.com/engine-oil-filter-11681.html). However no one explicitly lists the GTS. Only Cayman S 09-14.
 

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No issue swapping out Pagid Yellow / stock pads. I keep things labelled w/r/t inner / outer pad (and driver / passenger side), but I'm not sure if that really matters. I swap before and after most events - prob 10 times a year. And also agree with Mr_Brown... after engine break in, I would be far more comfortable with fresh oil before getting out on track. Who knows what tiny metal particles from break-in could be floating around in there - sure would be nice to get them out. I don't think the concern is the synthetic oil degradation in such a short time frame, it's what may be floating in the oil that you need to clean out.
 

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I always like that method, especially as the rotors wear and get specific groove patterns before it's time to recycle them.
 

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Change your oil, don't change pads or rotors.
I changed my oil at 2000 miles and went straight to Road America. I change oil after every two Track days and brake fluid at the beginning of the Track summer and just before Labor Day for the fall Track events.
Stock pads/rotors work just fine.
After market at this level is just another way to seperate you from your money.-Richard
 

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Caymudgeon
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I hear that the noise is pretty bad for regular street use?

Also does anyone know that if this oil filter is compatible with the Cayman GTS?
Amazon.com: MAHLE Original OX 366D Oil Filter: Automotive
Amazon says it is not. But couple of other places offer the same part (Schnell Autosports Engine Oil Filter (OX 366D), 987/981 (09-14) OEM, Genuine & Aftermarket Parts | Performance + Racing | Accessories). However no one explicitly lists the GTS. Only Cayman S 09-14.
Almost any respectable track pad is going to be noisy on the street. Pagid yellows are no different. I've found them to be quiet sometimes but it usually doesn't last long before the squealing starts.

I don't have a GTS but I can confirm that is the right filter for the 981S. I recently bought these exact filters on eBay, 2 for $29.99, free shipping.
 

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Change your oil, don't change pads or rotors.
Stock pads/rotors work just fine.
After market at this level is just another way to seperate you from your money.-Richard
Can't say I agree with this statement. Stock pads may work fine when just staring out, if OP is just learning the basics of track driving right now. Once you begin to pickup the speeds though, they can't possibly handle the heat of repetitive threshold braking. Same goes for stock brake fluid as well. Track pads are a must, once you get above the beginner group. My wife completely vaporized a brand new set of Hawk HPS (a "high performance" street pad) on her E92 M3 at the Glen after just a few sessions (one day)... down to the backing plate. Entire side of the car was covered with glittery brake dust - pretty cool looking actually. Now with PFC08s, she can go 6-7 two-day events easily. Yes, this is a heavier car, but this is still the same concept. For the Cayman, I prefer the Pagid Yellow (RS19), but there are lots of options. Yellow has the advantage of being very long lasting (it's an endurance pad), vs the Black, which probably has better bite, but won't last as many events for you. So, depending on your level of addiction (and experience), you may want to swap your pads out... there really is a difference between a track pad and a street pad.
 
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From reading the initial Post, it appears that the Poster has no actual Track experience.
So my answer was formulated to the origial Post from my 2 previous seasons and this season's experience in which I am still using stock Porsche pads at Road America. There is no fade, no requirement for additional stopping force and the factory system functions for every 30 minute period I have been on track. I did expect some degradation but as an experimentalist, i have learned to discount much of the 'urban legend' information bandied around. At my level now, I am in Sport Plus and drive the straights at Road America as fast as the car can go and see no need for additional braking. In fact if changing to other pads, my concerns would multiply for having to adequately bring the pads up to temperature and the effect on braking in normal driving.
So why complicate things for a novice driver?
Let him change his oil and get on with it!
His brakes/pads will function just fine.-Richard
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've been out on the track twice, but both of these times were in my S2000 and not in my new Cayman - hence my questions. Both times out for me I tended to be overly cautious and therefore not overly fast. I don't anticipate the stock brakes being a problem on this car for now, but the oil does worry me.

Thanks for the input everyone.
 

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Maybe you forgo the pads, but flush the fluid to Motul 600 or the like. Better for the track and no problem on the street. Bleeding the brakes before or after each track event also dumps the heated and abused fluid that is inside the calipers and replaces it with fresh unadulterated fluid. If you stay with stock pads, watch the wear as they will go quickly at the track.
 
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