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I'd find a good independent mechanic BEFORE you buy. You want someone to do a PPI (Pre Purchase Inspection), and it certainly shouldn't be the guy who said $3700 for CV joints/axles! My Boxster S needed them, and it was less than $1000 in central Arkansas, where there isn't much competition (he's very good, though).

Also, join the Lone Star PCA group. They will have mechanic recommendations and members might even have cars for sale. As always in Houston area, watch out for flood cars.
 

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A friend of mine is wanting to sell me his Cayman S 2006 for $15,000 (65,000 miles and the original owner).

I had it checked out at a shop and they said I needed $11,000 worth of repairs: $2,400 to change the brakes, replace CV axels $3,700 and replace the struts $4,800.

I balked at buying the Cayman....but are these numbers typical of the repairs on this car?
Do most of the work yourself in your garage and it becomes a pretty good deal....none of those jobs is impossible and it turns into quality time.
 

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Personally, i wouldn't go with the PDK. I"ve read of $8000 minimum to replace with a used PDK, if it fails. Do what repairs you can, to avoid much of the rip-offs.
Choosing (or not choosing) PDK should not be based on unknown repair costs. My Cayman has it and I love shifting it with the paddles. My friend like to row his own. It’s really a matter of personal choice.
 

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A friend of mine is wanting to sell me his Cayman S 2006 for $15,000 (65,000 miles and the original owner).

I had it checked out at a shop and they said I needed $11,000 worth of repairs: $2,400 to change the brakes, replace CV axels $3,700 and replace the struts $4,800.

I balked at buying the Cayman....but are these numbers typical of the repairs on this car?
If you have good mechanics ability and great tool set of SAE and Metirc - and oatocne with the willingness to learn - you can do the work yourself as I do and save a bundle!
 

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A friend of mine is wanting to sell me his Cayman S 2006 for $15,000 (65,000 miles and the original owner).

I had it checked out at a shop and they said I needed $11,000 worth of repairs: $2,400 to change the brakes, replace CV axels $3,700 and replace the struts $4,800.

I balked at buying the Cayman....but are these numbers typical of the repairs on this car?
This is the reason why I sold my 2006 CS with 30K miles. It cost me $1100 for 6 spark plugs and coil packs (a Porsche defect) from an Indy shop. I enjoyed the last 10 years with the car: Let the next owner absorb the extravagant charges, whether from a Porsche Stealer or Indy.
 

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I recommend learning to work on cars in general. In this age we have very helpful blogs, forums, and videos that walk through the most common repairs. The challenge may be if this is your only vehicle and you are short on time. I researched both generations of 987's for months before I decided to buy one to be sure this is a car I can maintain myself. What I learned is that the repairs definitely take more time than my previous Japanese cars, but removing nuts and bolts is still the same. If you can turn a wrench and follow instructions, then you can perform most repairs for the price of parts. You will need invest in tools which are typically acquired over a period of time.

Completing your own repairs is very cost effective and satisfying. In addition you know that bolts are torqued properly and that nothing else on the vehicle was touched. You know the job has been completed correctly. (Big tire chain shop rotated my tires on my Tundra last year before a 1600 mile road trip. I should have checked their work because halfway through my trip I almost lost my LR tire at 75mph due to two studs shearing off. They clearly did not torque that wheel. They owned up and reimbursed the cost of repairs but that could have been a serious accident.)
 

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I recommend learning to work on cars in general. In this age we have very helpful blogs, forums, and videos that walk through the most common repairs. The challenge may be if this is your only vehicle and you are short on time. I researched both generations of 987's for months before I decided to buy one to be sure this is a car I can maintain myself. What I learned is that the repairs definitely take more time than my previous Japanese cars, but removing nuts and bolts is still the same. If you can turn a wrench and follow instructions, then you can perform most repairs for the price of parts. You will need invest in tools which are typically acquired over a period of time.

Completing your own repairs is very cost effective and satisfying. In addition you know that bolts are torqued properly and that nothing else on the vehicle was touched. You know the job has been completed correctly. (Big tire chain shop rotated my tires on my Tundra last year before a 1600 mile road trip. I should have checked their work because halfway through my trip I almost lost my LR tire at 75mph due to two studs shearing off. They clearly did not torque that wheel. They owned up and reimbursed the cost of repairs but that could have been a serious accident.)
Great points. I’m 56 (and am in the market for a 987). I never did much on my cars except DIY oil changes four years—Mostly Honda and Acura. I then got into E46 BMWs, had f4 between my son and I, and YouTube and online forms became my best friend I learned so much and did everything from control arm replacement to differential bushings to valve cover gasket, cooling system refresh, and Vanos seals. To me it was fun and rewarding, and as you say satisfying.
There is so much knowledge and so many knowledgeable people willing to share and I thank you all for that!
 

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I’ve owned my 13 year old Cayman S for 2 years now and I’m a certified YouTube mechanic. It really doesn’t even make me mad to work on my car. Most recent was the broken shifter cable, replaced with numeric and did the shifter while it was taken apart. I had a coolant leak last year that I fixed as well. These cars aren’t hard to work on, maybe a bit tight, but manageable.
 

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A friend of mine is wanting to sell me his Cayman S 2006 for $15,000 (65,000 miles and the original owner).

I had it checked out at a shop and they said I needed $11,000 worth of repairs: $2,400 to change the brakes, replace CV axels $3,700 and replace the struts $4,800.

I balked at buying the Cayman....but are these numbers typical of the repairs on this car?
If you want to play you have to pay. Otherwise, be like me and do your own DIY’s and save thousands. There is a luxury tax most shops charge unfortunately.
 

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Luxury tax is about right. Part of it is just high labor rates at specialist shops with a minimum billable time, so you'll end up paying for a very expensive hour of work even if the job only takes 15 minutes. A decent indie specializing in Euro cars and specifically Porsche will have higher rates than your average tech, though at least they won't be as bad as the stealership.

So, yeah, learn to DIY as much as you're comfortable with and it'll reap huge dividends. Also, it really helps to befriend someone with a lift :)
 
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