Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
223 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if this is the right forum.
I Have a Cayman S, I go to the track once every 2 months and drive on the twisty mountain roads every other week.

My disk brakes are shot, have little cracks out of the rotor holes , have grooves, shake when braking at about 60mph.

So need to get new discs and new pads.

I want something that can be used in the city, abused at the track and mountains and perform.

What do you guys recommend?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,027 Posts
I've heard slotted rotors are better for the track while drilled rotors are better for the street. However, there's no reason why you can't have slotted rotors installed on the car 100% of the time.

Do you want to change out your brake pads when you track the car? If so, then some racing/track pads may work out better for your track days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,614 Posts
I agree on the slotted rotors comment. I like them a lot better than drilled. I have Girodisc, and they have worked great for me. You can also get replacement slotted rotors for less. I got the Girodisc because I wanted improved performance, more heat dissipation for the track and I liked the idea and weight savings of the aluminum hats compared to a completely cast rotor. If you are interest do a serch on Girodisc or go to the install article. If you plan to do a lot of track days they will be a good investment.

As far as pads I have Pagid yellow track pads, and oem stock pads for the street. I tried using Pagid orange for the track and the street, and I wanted a little more bite at the track, and less noise in the street. So pads are always a compromise. I found changing the pads for the street, and again for the track is worth it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,614 Posts
In general slotted rotors work well with street pads. The theory is that the holes in the drilled rotos will evacuate water better when raining, they are lighter than non drilled rotors. I live where it rains a lot and I have never had problems with slotted rotors. I use street pads most the time, and Pagid yellow for track days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I would second the recommendation of Girodisc slotted rotors for sure! We've installed quite a few sets and have been thrilled with the results. For mostly street use and occasional track time, you'd be best suited with the slotted only rotors. Even with occasional track event, you'll accelerate the wear if you use slotted and drilled rotors, especially if you're using track pads. That cracking around the holes you see on the stock rotors is very common after hard use on the track.

Keep in mind too, that you really shouldn't use track pads on the street. Brakes function best when there is a very fine layer of pad material transferred to the rotors. This "transfer layer" bonds to the rotor and allows the brakes to perform at their best. When track pads are cold, they are purely abrasive and will polish away that transfer layer relatively quickly. Street pads, however, are designed to perform at cooler temperatures, where they will maintain that "transfer layer" without operating at higher temps like track pads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
I agree on the slotted rotors comment. I like them a lot better than drilled. I have Girodisc, and they have worked great for me. You can also get replacement slotted rotors for less. I got the Girodisc because I wanted improved performance, more heat dissipation for the track and I liked the idea and weight savings of the aluminum hats compared to a completely cast rotor. If you are interest do a serch on Girodisc or go to the install article. If you plan to do a lot of track days they will be a good investment.

As far as pads I have Pagid yellow track pads, and oem stock pads for the street. I tried using Pagid orange for the track and the street, and I wanted a little more bite at the track, and less noise in the street. So pads are always a compromise. I found changing the pads for the street, and again for the track is worth it.
List:

I agree with everything said above. This is probably the best setup. Yes, you have to change pads before you go to the track and after you get home. There are few cars around that are easier for pad changing, so it's really easy. While you're changing pads and have the wheels off the car, clean them up inside and out. They'll look great. The Girodisc is great because it's bigger and you get stronger braking leverage with a bigger diameter. It comes with an adapter that moves your calipers out a little bit to fit.

I don't recommend changing anything at the track that you don't absolutely have to. Minimize your distractions and relax between sessions. You'll drive better. If something unexpected does go wrong, you'll have time to do something about it.

I've had students who use their track day for doing maintenance they didn't get around to before. What a waste! By the time they get in the car, they're dirty and frazzled trying to do too many things at one. Also the repairs are done in a hurry. How cool is it to forget to tighten caliper bolts or pad retainers? One guy had his new girlfriend and his kid (it was his weekend) and was fooling with his brakes, changing tires and about 3 other things while trying to placate his child and girlfriend. By the time he got to the track, all he needed was a nap! He talked nonstop, drover terribly, learned nothing and went home after 2 sessions. Sometimes you just need to make a decision and say no to something.

FYI- I've learned to take the boring interstate route to-from tracks when I have track brakes on. I took the pretty back way with Yellows on the CS and it nearly drove me nuts. Take the route that requires the least braking.

FYI- When you change pads, soak both sides of each rotor with Windex or other ammonia-based window cleaner (I use Sparkle). Then wipe with paper towels. You'll be amazed how much **** you see on the towel.

The track pads can pick up that layer of stuff from the street pads and form little globs of black goo. You'll think you have severely warped rotors as soon as you heat the brakes up. I've had this changing from street type pads to Pagid Orange and also on some other track pads. It's no fun and spitz window cleaner prevents this from happening. Do it each time you change pads.

Also do it when you install new rotors. They come with a coating of rust preventative and it will also muck up your pads. I was really amazed when I got black paper towels after cleaning sparkling, brand new rotors!

After trying for many years to find the perfect do-everything pad, I've realized that there is no such thing. Your street brakes will last a lot longer if you never use them on the track. Pagid Yellow are the longest lasting track pads you can get. They're endurance racer's favorite. So, the combo of stock pads for the street and Yellows for the track are the best.

Drilled rotors do crack at the holes when you get them real hot. Not ideal. Plain or slotted rotors for the track.

FYI: The slots can help with glazing of the pads. It's also good to avoid dragging your track brakes into corners too much. Not just slow, it glazes the pads. Don't slam them on, but use them with rapidly increasing force until just before ABS. (Threshold Braking). Trail-braking is good sometimes, but it's only half a second to help rotate a car as you enter the turn, won't glaze the pads. I'm talking about braking waay early and lightly. Find your comfortable brake point. Remember it and then use it each time.

FYI: Never ever pull your parking brake when your car is hot off the track. Warping and/or sticking the e-brake to the little drums can result. Use 1st gear or reverse to hold the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
The track pads can pick up that layer of stuff from the street pads and form little globs of black goo. You'll think you have severely warped rotors as soon as you heat the brakes up. I've had this changing from street type pads to Pagid Orange and also on some other track pads. It's no fun and spitz window cleaner prevents this from happening. Do it each time you change pads.
All very sound advice.

Your best bet to avoid the brake shuttering you mentioned above is to leave your track pads on for a day after your event, before changing back to streets. When the track pads operate cold, they'll act as an abrasive that will wipe away the pad material left on the rotors. The same holds true for when you first put them on in place of street pads. Let them wipe away the street pad material left on the rotor, then bed them.

Also remember you'll need to bed the pads every time you change from street to track pads, and vice versa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
I drive a lot in the rain , even on the track, wouldnt drilled rotors be best for me?
Based on how you use your car (the track every couple months, and some spirited drives here and there) I'd stick with slotted. Those few time where you really drive hard on the cross-drilled could cause them to get damaged and wear too quickly. Slotted is a safe bet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
Girodisc slotted rotors are a beautiful thing but cost $2200.

Use Pagid Orange front and either stock pads or Pagid black in the rear. It's the rears that make noise on the street because they don't get hot enough to keep them clean.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Girodisc slotted rotors are a beautiful thing but cost $2200.

Use Pagid Orange front and either stock pads or Pagid black in the rear. It's the rears that make noise on the street because they don't get hot enough to keep them clean.

Crikee, man! I had no idea they cost that much. You can buy a set of big Stoptechs with calipers for that.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top