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Discussion Starter #1
I'm upgrading my Mk II Audi TT 3.2 to a 09 or later Cayman S. I track the car at least once a month and want opinions on what options to get. I'm going to lease this car for 2-3 years and don't plan on modifying it much.

I've heard from the Porsche guys the the Ceramic Brakes are not that useful and I've heard mixed reviews on the adaptive suspension.

What seats? Bucket or Sport or aftermarket?
Sports Chrono?
Exhaust?
 

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PCCB may not be right for you. With monthly track use, the rotors will not last 3 years, and they cost $15K. PASM may be worthwhile on dual purpose car. But with monthly track use, assuming an advanced group driver, I kind of reckon you will be replacing the suspension, so maybe skip the PASM. The Porsche sport buckets are good seats, as are the Euro GT3 seats, anything more aggressive will be awful for the street. You will probably want to install the GT3 front LCAs to get more camber. Tarrett sells a kit that includes adapters that allow you to use the existing trailing arms, but it's still going to cost about $1K. If you decide on an adjustable suspension, you can get the camber adjustability with front camber plates. With your level of track use, assuming you will also drive it routinely on the street, you will want an extra set of wheels/tires; recommend 18" CCW. I personally do not like Sport Chrono, had it on both a CS and 997S. The throttle mapping is too sensitive for me, and you will probably turn off PSM, so the more aggressive setting through SC doesn't matter. Have fun.
 

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I had the same decision to make as to options. I wanted to track the car and also autocross it. Under SCCA rules the base Cayman is in a class that it can be very competitive in where as the Cayman S is in Super Stock and not as competitive ( drivers do make a difference though). So I optioned the following.

Base Cayman with PDK, LSD, PASM and sport Chrono. I choose the sport bucket seats again to keep everything stock, they are the lightest factory seats and already have slots for harnesses . Car should be here in mid January. I already have a harness bar and will pick up the Simpson harnesses today. The other thing I did was get some BBS forged wheels. Slightly lighter than the OEM but also stronger and forged wheels will bend whereas cast will fracture under the same impact. If I were younger I would just go and get an interseries car.

By the way I have tracked a C2S with PDK and there are two clear advantages over a stick. First it is quicker through the gears and second it completely removes the chance for a mechanical over-rev from a missed down shift. It is slightly heavier than a manual but not that great. Lastly with the Sport Chrono engaged the PDK is re-mapped for more optimizing its performance.
 

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I've a 2008 CS and only took it to VIR for my first DE a few weeks ago. The one thing that stood out was that the basic stock seats doesn't cut it. I was struggling to stay put during sustained hard cornering, and it became a little fatiquing after several sessions. The sport bucket is probably a necessity if you track often.

Woof
 

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What qualifies as "modifying much" in your mind?

Pure stock options? I'd get PDK w/ paddle shifters, sport chrono, and PASM. Best, most sporty seats available.

Wheel/ tire size depends upon if you are limiting yourself to a single size. If that is the case, I would do with 19's and just run PS2s.

That would be without a nickel in after market mods.
 

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PCCB may not be right for you. With monthly track use, the rotors will not last 3 years, and they cost $15K. PASM may be worthwhile on dual purpose car. But with monthly track use, assuming an advanced group driver, I kind of reckon you will be replacing the suspension, so maybe skip the PASM. The Porsche sport buckets are good seats, as are the Euro GT3 seats, anything more aggressive will be awful for the street. You will probably want to install the GT3 front LCAs to get more camber. Tarrett sells a kit that includes adapters that allow you to use the existing trailing arms, but it's still going to cost about $1K. If you decide on an adjustable suspension, you can get the camber adjustability with front camber plates. With your level of track use, assuming you will also drive it routinely on the street, you will want an extra set of wheels/tires; recommend 18" CCW. I personally do not like Sport Chrono, had it on both a CS and 997S. The throttle mapping is too sensitive for me, and you will probably turn off PSM, so the more aggressive setting through SC doesn't matter. Have fun.
+1 agree on all points. I'd emphasize the sport buckets - you can resell these for way more than the option price if you don't like them. Definitely get LSD. I've got CCW wheels and they are superb. With GT3 control arms and some camber plates and Tarett sway bars and drop-links you can get a very nice setup with standard PASM suspension - nice if you want to keep a comfortable street ride. You'll also have to decide if you want manual or PDK. I prefer the involvement of the manual, but you'll get quicker lap times with the PDK.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Guys you are very helpful and I hope to be joining you soon (my Audi lease is up a couple of months).
 

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For a track car, I'd go with:
  • PDK -concentrate on the line
  • Standard Suspension - You're probably going to change it
  • Sport Seats - They'll do OK until you're really cooking
  • Sport Chrono - You'll want this for the PDK profiles
  • LSD - good for coner exit and braking stability
  • Standard Brakes - They'll hold up better and cost less
  • 18" wheels - The tires bite better and they cost less
Everything else is optional. Save some money to pay for track time, which will make you faster than anything you can bolt on.
 

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I'd go with everything Gator Bite says but would have PASM based on your statement of "don't plan on modifying it much", as PASM is good on the track and I count a change in suspension as a significant mod, unlike an exhaust which is easy to change out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This is pretty much what I had decided on. I'm thinking of adding the active suspension since it is my street car and the softer available setting will remove the annoying noise in the passenger seat (i.e. My complaining spouse)


For a track car, I'd go with:
  • PDK -concentrate on the line
  • Standard Suspension - You're probably going to change it
  • Sport Seats - They'll do OK until you're really cooking
  • Sport Chrono - You'll want this for the PDK profiles
  • LSD - good for coner exit and braking stability
  • Standard Brakes - They'll hold up better and cost less
  • 18" wheels - The tires bite better and they cost less
Everything else is optional. Save some money to pay for track time, which will make you faster than anything you can bolt on.
 

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For a track car, I'd go with:
  • PDK -concentrate on the line
  • Standard Suspension - You're probably going to change it
  • Sport Seats - They'll do OK until you're really cooking
  • Sport Chrono - You'll want this for the PDK profiles
  • LSD - good for coner exit and braking stability
  • Standard Brakes - They'll hold up better and cost less
  • 18" wheels - The tires bite better and they cost less
Everything else is optional. Save some money to pay for track time, which will make you faster than anything you can bolt on.
So is pasm not up to the job on track as regards falling short in performance to after market suspension? So using lower springs with pasm is no real advantage on track
 

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So is pasm not up to the job on track as regards falling short in performance to after market suspension? So using lower springs with pasm is no real advantage on track
In my experience PASM is excellent on the track.

Plus, whether you have PASM or not, does not really have any effect on the suspension mods you can do in the future; there are fine aftermarket suspensions for cars with PASM and you continue to get the dual settings and the *active* suspension which you won't get if you start out with a car that does not have PASM.

The beauty of PASM is that it is *active*; it automatically adjusts regardless of whether it is in normal or sport mode; that is its big advantage over non-PASM suspensions. It works and quite well in fact!
 

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So is pasm not up to the job on track as regards falling short in performance to after market suspension? So using lower springs with pasm is no real advantage on track
There is no aftermarket suspension that combines the street comfort of PASM with its significantly stiffer than stock "sport" suspension. Bottom line: for a dedicated track car you can do better than PASM, but for a street/track car PASM is magical. PASM will also simplify your life and lower overall costs compared with a suspension upgrade and then back to oem during the 2-3 yr lease term.

Obviously, PDK only makes sense if you prefer an automatic (albeit incredibly sophisticated) to the involvement of manual shifting, which many here do not. Likewise, SC's throttle mapping is not universally liked - some (like me) find it hard to finely modulate the throttle on track & in slippery conditions in "Sport," although it is a desirable option w/PDK.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
What about the sport exhaust system? Does that provide any performance enhancement or just for aesthetics?
 

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This is pretty much what I had decided on. I'm thinking of adding the active suspension since it is my street car and the softer available setting will remove the annoying noise in the passenger seat (i.e. My complaining spouse)
I have PASM and love it. Expecially for a dual purpose Porsche. Nice and forgiving on the street, tightens right up on the track (even in Normal mode).

So is pasm not up to the job on track as regards falling short in performance to after market suspension? So using lower springs with pasm is no real advantage on track
I wouldn't say that. It certainly is, in my opinion. Read more below.

In my experience PASM is excellent on the track.

Plus, whether you have PASM or not, does not really have any effect on the suspension mods you can do in the future; there are fine aftermarket suspensions for cars with PASM and you continue to get the dual settings and the *active* suspension which you won't get if you start out with a car that does not have PASM.

The beauty of PASM is that it is *active*; it automatically adjusts regardless of whether it is in normal or sport mode; that is its big advantage over non-PASM suspensions. It works and quite well in fact!
Very good points, all the way around.

There is no aftermarket suspension that combines the street comfort of PASM with its significantly stiffer than stock "sport" suspension. Bottom line: for a dedicated track car you can do better than PASM, but for a street/track car PASM is magical. PASM will also simplify your life and lower overall costs compared with a suspension upgrade and then back to oem during the 2-3 yr lease term.
That echos my thoughts exactly.


What about the sport exhaust system? Does that provide any performance enhancement or just for aesthetics?
Porsche claims no gain. I've seen cars on the dyno show a gain in 'sport' mode when they have PSE. If you want the best of both worlds and don't want to mess with the exhaust, go PSE. If you want something more aggressive, skip it and go aftermarket.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I test drove one today and wooohoooo! I'm going to be placing my order next week
I'm going to go with:
Carrara White
Sports Bucket Seats
PDK
PASM
Limited Slip Rear Differential Lock
Sports Chrono

I'm thinking about the Bose Surround System, any opinions?

You guys ROCK, this board is much more active than the Audi ones. I look forward to hanging out with you guys when my car shows up in April :)
 

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I test drove one today and wooohoooo! I'm going to be placing my order next week
I'm going to go with:
Carrara White
Sports Bucket Seats
PDK
PASM
Limited Slip Rear Differential Lock
Sports Chrono

I'm thinking about the Bose Surround System, any opinions?

You guys ROCK, this board is much more active than the Audi ones. I look forward to hanging out with you guys when my car shows up in April :)
Congrats, sound like a great spec. No on the BOSE. It's curious why Porsche even offers it - listen and you'll see. Aftermarket audio all the way if you want to listen to tunes while driving.
 

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Congrats, sound like a great spec. No on the BOSE. It's curious why Porsche even offers it - listen and you'll see. Aftermarket audio all the way if you want to listen to tunes while driving.
+1. I think it's either tradition or a reminder that Porsches are about the driving experience since Porsche oem sound systems since the beginning have all sucked. So, how much do you want to spend for a factory sound system that is blown away by those in economy cars? I passed on Bose and haven't had a regret in 3+ years. YMMV.
 

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The Bose is okay and not great as many people have said, but for me it is fine for what I use it for. The base system is anemic at best. I went with the Bose because I am not into tearing out my dash and doors to put in a new system. Most of the time I am listening to the engine. :hilarious:
 
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