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Discussion Starter #1
SO through the course of daily use, I am starting to get a few light scratches in the paint. (this paint is the most susceptible of any car I have ever owned). Is this something I can buy a tool, like a buffer, myself. Or is this something I really need to take to a pro. If this is the case, what do I even ask for and what is the cost of something like this?
 

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You can do it yourself but I would take it to a top notch shop, have them correct the paint then either seal it with CQuartz finest or apply Xpel to protect it. Xpel and CQuartz are different types of products so do some research. They should both stop paint swirling.
 

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You can do it yourself but I would take it to a top notch shop, have them correct the paint then either seal it with CQuartz finest or apply Xpel to protect it. Xpel and CQuartz are different types of products so do some research. They should both stop paint swirling.
If I do it myself, do you know a good tool for the job. A link to an example product would be awesome if you know of one. Thanks
 

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I am not very knowledgeable about detailing and would never risk your cars finish on my base of information. Perhaps searching our forum or searching for a detailing non Porsche forum would give you better answers.
 

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Thanks...Since this is not the last time I will have to do this I'm sure, I am going to buy a tool and try it myself CAREFULLY.....lol I did a little googling and found Porter Cable 7424XP is a well thought of tool. I will see how it goes for the scratches. If nothing else, it looks like it will be good for waxing in general.
I also bought Astro Pneumatic 4607 5" PU Velcro Backing Pad and Chemical Guys BUFX104HEX5 Hex-Logic Light-Medium Polishing Pad, White - 5.5 in.
I am thinking this should be all I need. I guess I just apply some wax and buff the heck out of it and this will reduce the scratches. If I am way off base, some one please correct me lol
 

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Thanks...Since this is not the last time I will have to do this I'm sure, I am going to buy a tool and try it myself CAREFULLY.....lol I did a little googling and found Porter Cable 7424XP is a well thought of tool. I will see how it goes for the scratches. If nothing else, it looks like it will be good for waxing in general.
I also bought Astro Pneumatic 4607 5" PU Velcro Backing Pad and Chemical Guys BUFX104HEX5 Hex-Logic Light-Medium Polishing Pad, White - 5.5 in.
I am thinking this should be all I need. I guess I just apply some wax and buff the heck out of it and this will reduce the scratches. If I am way off base, some one please correct me lol
Wait, wax will do nothing. You need polish. Try Menzerna. Start with a light grit and then move to a more serious grit if necessary. The PC is fine.

Menzerna USA: The World's Finest Polishing Materials Amazon will sell it in multiple grits like start at 4000 and move down to 1500 if you need to. Or talk to DetailersDomain. PM Phil. One of our sponsors. I'm sure he can set you out on the correct path.

This isn't brain surgery. If I can so it, you can do it ;)
 

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Yes, with some practice, you can easily buff out light scratches. But please practice first on a cheaper car :) Watch some videos and remember there is only so much clear coat on the car, so don't go crazy and do more and more often then necessary.

The main tool you need is DA polisher. They basically make it impossible to screw things up. I use this: http://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-7424XP-6-Inch-Variable-Speed-Polisher/dp/B002654I46/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1425926603&sr=8-2&keywords=da+polisher

There are some more expensive brands, but they all work on same principles.

You'll also need some cutting and polishing compounds. Menzerna mentioned above is a reputable brand.

I usually do some light polishing once a year in spring.
 
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The less you touch your car, the less chance there is of inducing light scratches. I only wash the car when it's dirty, only wipe it down immediately after a wash, etc.
 

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Polish cleans and removes scratches. Wax protects what you have cleaned. Get a random orbital buffer. Practice on a cheap(er) car before you try doing it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, with some practice, you can easily buff out light scratches. But please practice first on a cheaper car :) Watch some videos and remember there is only so much clear coat on the car, so don't go crazy and do more and more often then necessary.

The main tool you need is DA polisher. They basically make it impossible to screw things up. I use this: PORTER-CABLE 7424XP 6-Inch Variable-Speed Polisher - Power Polishing Tools - Amazon.com

There are some more expensive brands, but they all work on same principles.

You'll also need some cutting and polishing compounds. Menzerna mentioned above is a reputable brand.

I usually do some light polishing once a year in spring.
Awesome! I ordered the polish and some pads in addition to the Buffer. Thanks for all the great advice. I will test it out on my wife's Bimmer first ;)
 

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As suggested above, if you don't have experience polishing, pay a reputable detailer. Learn on another car or an old hood from the junk yard. Like chow said, it's not brain surgery. However, getting good results does require some experience.

If you do attempt the work yourself, just remember that today's paints are fairly thin. You don't have a whole lot of extra paint there. When polishing paint, many people find it tempting to remove all the defects in search of a perfect finish, but you must leave some paint on the car for future polishing/defect removal. Deeper scratches or more serious marring should be improved, but not fully removed.

Many weekend detailers start out using a Porter Cable dual action polisher. It's a good polisher (mine is over 12 years old, now), but there are better units which correct more quickly. Some are significantly more expensive, though (Rupes and Flex, for example).

A good polish is essential. Menzerna polishes are very good. Another good polish, in particular, is 3D Car Care's HD Polish. The polishing pads are equally important. Lake Country makes good pads. A basic polishing pad (not a compounding or cutting pad) and HD Polish would likely remove or greatly improve minor marring/fine scratches and produce a very glossy finish. Then finish up with a good wax or sealant. It sounds simple, but there are a good amount of fine points. These are leaned from experience or proper instruction (or both).

Visit Autopia's or AutoGeek's various detailing forums. There's a wealth of information there.
 

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I've done about 6 of my cars with a random orbital buffer and :

Meguiar's DA Microfiber kit. It comes with two microfiber cutting discs, two microfiber polish discs, one "pink" cutting compound, one polishing compound, and an apron for under $100.00 or so.

Utilize the cutting discs and (pink) compound with a "quality" buffer on about the 4 speed setting. Go over each panel w/light pressure (put a mark on the buffers main pad so you can verify that it is spinning). With the cutting etc. compound you slowly move over the panel. Go in a pattern where you cross over a bit where you just went "kind of like mowing the lawn" Then wipe off with a micro fiber towel. Then after the panel is done use the other polish pad with the dark polish at about 2 speed on the buffer doing the same thing in pattern design. Wipe off with another micro fiber.

Then use an all in one quick wax spray like V07-BLACK FIRE-SONAX etc. Your choice.

It is almost impossible to cut through the clear with this unless you left the buffer on 10 speed and kept it in the same place for like 5-10 minutes!! It is virtually fool proof. My 15 year old son (who is now 18) did friends cars the same way for YEARS and never had one issue.

This product has removed scratches from ALL my cars! All swirls out of black. YOU NAME IT! If it's in the clear coat and it can be cut....IT WILL FIX IT!!!

Working in Auto Body shops and the insurance repair design for 20+ years...For the money...THIS STUFF IS ABOUT THE EASIEST and best stuff I have ever seen or used.

THE COVER the nose WITH XPEL and the rest of the car with 9h hard Ceramic Pro. This WILL need done professionally.
 

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Steve1ddd, a simple word of advice: Do your homework before putting polisher to paint.

Got my CS last spring and wanted to take on the task of polishing the car. Then I started looking into what it takes and I was quickly overwhelmed - polishes (aggressive vs. mild), claying (what the heck was that?), sealants, waxes, pads (I keep a color chart on my garage wall so I know which pads to use with which compounds), DA polisher (I bought the Griot's Garage and am very happy with it).

As others have advised, practice on an older car first. I read tons of articles on how-to, primarily from Detailer's Domain and Autogeek, before getting the guts up to actually try it. We have 5 cars - a 1996 Toyota T100, 2002 Honda Civic, 2002 Acura MDX, 2006 Acura TL and the 2007 CS. I practiced first on the T100 and then on the Civic. It wasn't as hard as I thought it was going to be, but the second car - the Civic - definitely turned out better than the first one, the truck. Then I moved to the MDX. It turned out even better yet. Clearly a case of practice makes perfect, or in this case practice makes better! At the end of the summer, I tackled the CS and was confident I could do a decent job without doing any harm to the car. It turned out great!

About the products. I won't presume to suggest what to use, that seems to be a very personal choice. For me, I chose the Menzerna line after lots of research. For the older cars, I used the 1500 polish and it really took out the many, many swirl marks that had accumulated over the years. For the MDX and the Porsche, I used the 4000 polish and it, too, took out the minor swirl marks. I finished all of the cars with the Power Lock sealant and the results were excellent.

I'm looking forward to another round of detailing this spring. Enjoy it. But, be sure you're confident in what you're doing before diving it. Good luck.
 

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Seems like a lot of advice about DA'ing or buffing the car, but I'd start with considering what you mean by light scratches.

In time, scratches/swirl marks are inevitable, but you need to decide at what point you want to DA a car. As some have said, DA'ing does effectively remove material from the clear coat, and whilst it is miniscule amounts, it isn't something you want to do that many times. There is also the risk of burning an edge if you're new to the game.

Sure, some say you can DA a car every month for years and never go through the clear coat, but others will tell you once or twice a year is about all you want to be doing. And some will say if you DA with the right products, the material removed is barely measurable.

Either way, it's a bit of a black art when you're new to it and yet you can get very good results with just waxing/polishing, even by hand, with products that are very good at masking ('filling in') light scratches. Do it as part of your washing routine, or every few washes and you'll probably be perfectly happy with the result.

Similarly, you can also cut by hand, it's a good way of making a visible improvement to scratches/swirls, without the worry of how much material you're removing and using a machine.

I think only if a car has a decent amount of unsightly swirl marks (again, hard to describe and subject to people's OCD and personal opinion :) ), then that is the time to have a go with a DA etc.
 

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I recommend you leave it as is. Scratches are not a big deal...unless it you got keyed or something. Minor scratches aren't noticable and acceptable wear and deep scratches require repaint.

There are plenty of products that remove light scratches by esentilally sanding the area and filling in the scratch. It's not going to remove the scratch completely and leave a "wave" in the spot sanded. A pro detailer can do well enough its least noticable, but end of the day, you just moved the problem around. I personally have messed up my paint in 2 previous cars fooling with removing scratches and every time I kicked myself saying I should of just left it. I especially warn if it's a deep scratch you need to settle on that repainting is the only real solution and be not be too aggressive or you'll make it worse. Repainting is never perfect too and you'll notice plenty of problems compared to factory.
 
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