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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just an FYI for any owners with 100,000 miles on their car or park outside and your black trim has faded, buy this Wipe New stuff now! I found its sold at Target for about $12, couldn't find it at the regular auto part stores, I can't even see how those back to black type products with silicone or other drying agents can remain in business.

Vehicle Car Automotive wheel system Automotive exterior Auto part


I read about it in Consumer Reports as it was the only product that kept black trim looking good for a year vs the others that barely last a few weeks and wash off during car washes.

I found it really does make all the trim look new with only one exception. Doesn't work on the window trim, so don't bother applying it there, its tedious to apply there anyway.

But the following areas: black plastic triangle behind the the side view mirrors, the black trim under the wipers, the wipers themselves, everything under the frunk, the middle black "mouth" in the bumper, and the front radiator vents and the plastic behind them. Even worked wonders on my Yakima bike rack (yes I have a rack on my 987). I've had 2 car washes and still looks new. Anything that is hard plastic and NOT rubberized like the door seals, interior, and tires would be a candidate for this. I've heard the headlight treatment isn't good so I didn't bother with that, but please post if you do like it.

Some tips. Spray any areas with Dupli-Color Prep-Spray and wipe them down good. The front area in the bumpers may have insect guts and I'd recommend spraying and wiping those twice. The plastic will look grey, that's when you know its clean.

Brush


Then put on the gloves, and SOAK the rag, the trick with the product is to apply it evenly, the towel must be soaked to do it right, just fold it in quarters then start wiping. Try not to get it on the paint, and if you do wipe it off with another clean rag. The stuff is toxic so don't do this in a non-ventelated garage.

If anyone has a trick to restore the windw trim let me know, its the only thing on my car that doesn't look new.
 

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I like 303 protectant with a great UV inhibitor built in. I believe Gumifledge, which was the best but now discontinued, was a repackaged Einszett product that might still be available at Pakshak and Ebay

The seals on most vehicles are no longer made of natural rubber; vehicle manufacturers use a specialized synthetic material called ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM). Real rubber, or blends containing real rubber, just cannot endure the direct exposure to sunlight (ultraviolet light) and the harmful-to-rubber oxidizing gases in our atmosphere.

The soft seals around doors, windows, sunroof’s, hood and trunk are constantly being flexed and compressed all the while being subjected to a hostile environment, ultra violet radiation (UVR), which turns them grey. For any type of protectant to work well the surface must be clean, on rubber first remove any road tar, grease and grime, wax and dead rubber from the surface to properly clean it. 3M Tire and Wheel cleaner quickly and safely cleans the EDPM surfaces, in between washes

Use a product that contains glycerine (Zymol Seal - Zymöl | Hand-Crafted Organic Care) a natural plant anti-oxidizing agent, it will prolong the useful life of the seal by restoring the original moisture and resist tearing and sticking (See also Water-based Dressing)

Good luck!
 

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I like 303 protectant with a great UV inhibitor built in. I believe Gumifledge, which was the best but now discontinued, was a repackaged Einszett product that might still be available at Pakshak and Ebay

The seals on most vehicles are no longer made of natural rubber; vehicle manufacturers use a specialized synthetic material called ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM). Real rubber, or blends containing real rubber, just cannot endure the direct exposure to sunlight (ultraviolet light) and the harmful-to-rubber oxidizing gases in our atmosphere.

The soft seals around doors, windows, sunroof’s, hood and trunk are constantly being flexed and compressed all the while being subjected to a hostile environment, ultra violet radiation (UVR), which turns them grey. For any type of protectant to work well the surface must be clean, on rubber first remove any road tar, grease and grime, wax and dead rubber from the surface to properly clean it. 3M Tire and Wheel cleaner quickly and safely cleans the EDPM surfaces, in between washes

Use a product that contains glycerine (Zymol Seal - Zymöl | Hand-Crafted Organic Care) a natural plant anti-oxidizing agent, it will prolong the useful life of the seal by restoring the original moisture and resist tearing and sticking (See also Water-based Dressing)

Good luck!
+1 for 303 Protectant!
 

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Similar question here. My Boxster awoke from its winter nap with some whitish discoloration on the interior door seals. They're never exposed to direct sunlight and certainly got no sun this winter. :( They may possibly have gotten soap, interior cleaner, or leather cleaner on them during fall detailing (not sealant). How do I get these back to black now, and is a tire cleaner generally best for this type of seal?
 
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