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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
http://www.planet-9.com/gallery/files/3/_31755.jpg I'm reminded of that song - All I want for Christmas is my Two Front Teeth when I think of the image I've posted below. Except in this case I would probably say all I want is my block re-sleeved but I should probably fill in the context/background of the story first for those who haven't been following along these oh so many years. Our saga begins back in 2008 when my Cayman suffered a catastrophic engine failure at the track. The proximate cause was the usual, and somewhat typical for 2006-2008 Caymans, a starvation of oil to the last rod in the engine resulting in rod failure and crankshaft, etc. damage.

Now as many of you know, Porsche has turned a blind eye to this problem. Since many of these failures occur with cars that have been tracked, Porsche simply points to the warranty and says that owners are not covered for taking their car to the track. Sadly, some owners have had the same failure without tracking their cars and Porsche has continued to disclaim any fault with their engines. Porsche used the same tactic with the now infamous intermediate shaft which ultimately resulted in a class action lawsuit and very few owners getting any kind of relief. Unless another class action lawsuit happens over these type of engine failures, I doubt owners will ever see any relief.

So, one would think that my engine would be fixed and the saga would be over right? Well, not exactly. You see Porsche decided NOT to replace my engine that had failed but rather to rebuild it as a cost savings measure for Porsche. Now, if an engine is rebuilt properly it can be just as good or better than the original build at the factory. Unfortunately, in my instance, this wasn't the case. Immediately after the rebuild I reported an excessive amount of engine oil use in the rebuilt motor. My local dealer that performed the rebuild assured me that the rings just needed to seat, or that this was typical during rebuilt engine break-in periods, etc. etc. So, taking their word for it, I continued to drive the car. The problem only got worse, to the point were I was fouling plugs with oil. I took the car to one of sponsors for a detailed inspection (TPC Racing) and they found the engine had issues and suggested a bore scope. (Where a camera is inserted into the engine to examine engine internals)

My local dealer performed this operation and returned video of missing chunks from inside one of my cylinders. Their claim was that something must have gotten past my air filter and into the engine can caused the damage. Anyone who knows anything about the intake route in a Cayman would know that's ridiculous, and so my local dealership washed their hands of any fault in the engine rebuild and pointed the finger back at me. At this point I was left with no other choice than to replace the engine on my own dime. Thankfully one of our sponsors - Napleton Porsche - had just pulled an engine out of a 2008 Cayman S Sport to do a 3.8L swap and was happy to take out my old defective engine and replace it with the one they had. So I drove to Chicago and had the work done and documented it previously on this site.

For most of you the story ended there and all was well. However, I still wanted to know what was actually wrong with my original motor so I had it sent over to LN Engineering (also located outside Chicago) and had the motor torn down and inspected. The inspection revealed a nightmare of things wrong with the motor, short cuts taken in the rebuild, and defective parts left in the motor that my dealership claimed it had replaced. I won't go into the details in this post, but will attach a PDF file to this post that has all of the sordid details. I recommend you read it as it is very educational, not only about engines, but about the type of work that was done at a Porsche dealership and passed off as "quality" or "accurate" service.

So this brings us to the picture below. Last weekend I drove back to Chicago to pick up the pieces of my original engine that had been in storage during a legal action against Porsche (which I'm not allowed to discuss in the forum). It was finally time to bring my original engine home. What will I do with it? I don't know. I suppose with new sleeves in the block the engine could be rebuilt, but I'm not in need of a new engine at the moment. If I ever sell my car I could include it for the new buyer who would be getting the original motor should they want to return the car to its original condition. I could perhaps buy a spot across my local Porsche dealership and put it on display for would-be customers to see what kind of work is performed there. I really haven't decided yet. But there you have it. Oh and one final thing, the shoebox has the pistons and rods in it, not shoes, not even my shoebox.



After you've read the attached PDF file check out the following, our former columnist has a book out, be sure to see the following topic for details:

http://www.planet-9.com/general-off-topic/90413-free-kindle-download-driver-book-i.html
 

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What a number Aristocrat pulled! I assume you are on the road to legal action. We would all be interested as to how it works out, whether Aristocrat, Porsche or both are held to blame (or hell to blame, as the case goes). Just curious, was the original failure due to oil starvation or over rev? I once missed a shift on the track, and downshifted to 2d instead of 4th. This could have been a very expensive downshift but the resulting over rev (up to 9xxx rpm did not seem to damage my engine. I stopped driving my Cayman on the track because, as I got better and sustained higher gees, I knew I would be bitten by the oil starvation problem would sooner or later. As it was, I had to replace both head gaskets ($5800) due to engine stress, so track expense had already taken a toll.

Best of luck!
 

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" I'm shocked, shocked to find that gambling is going on in here!" - Casablanca

Probably all about dollars and cents.

I'm shocked a Porsche dealer would treat you that way! :eek:
 
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Ken-

What an elegantly detailed PDF you included. Very impressive work on the part of LN & Werner to document & photograph your engine bits.

Good luck with this... if I recall, you're an attorney. Take it to a jury with the best product liability expert you can find.

Keep us in the loop, and as always, thanks for all you do.

John
 

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Were you running R-spec tires or stock?

MAM has a long left hander that worries me about starvation. I'm running stock tires, hence my question above.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Were you running R-spec tires or stock?

MAM has a long left hander that worries me about starvation. I'm running stock tires, hence my question above.
At the time the car was running stock Michelin pilot sport cup tires.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
 

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Ken,
It's shocking to see a dealer take such short cuts. It makes no sense. What did they think was going to happen in 10k, 20k miles... With an engine that has a failure, the whole engine needed to be gone through by a machine shop, inspected measured and balanced. There are so many things that could be out of tolerance. Though it shouldn't matter who the car owner is, it's just plain stupid to do that to someone who runs a Porsche club website. What the hell were they thinking? The bad press they will get from this far out weighs anything they would save from these short cuts. Reputation is everything and they just ruined theirs.
 

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Unbelievable! And then Porsche wonders why their reputation is taken to task so many times, you can only live on the reputation of your hood badge for so long.
 

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Discouraging to see a dealer perform so poorly. As others have said, they did no favor for themselves or Porsche.

What's really strange, is the things they didn't do were probably relatively small in the total cost of the rebuild.
 

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Discouraging to see a dealer perform so poorly. As others have said, they did no favor for themselves or Porsche.

What's really strange, is the things they didn't do were probably relatively small in the total cost of the rebuild.
Somebody is a moron....the tech who did the work is the #1 candidate...then his boss.....then the service manager. The legal term for this is "dog $...quality work". I happen to be in SE Asia at the moment, where they rebuild motors on the sidewalk using an adjustable wrench, pliers and a dull knife and they would do a better job!
 
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