Planet-9 Porsche Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
911 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well we got a little snow over the weekend so the DOT guys came out and spread salt on the roads. I HATE that stuff! Just spent a good part of my holiday weekend under my daughters SUV changing rotors and pads. It's ugly under there after years of salt. Even when the snow is gone and the roads are dry you can still see it on the road surface. Just can't bring myself to take the car out and spray the wheel wells with salt. Looks like she'll be in the garage for a while.

I usually like to wait until a good rain cleans the road and then hope the rain drys before the next precipitation so I can sneak out for a drive. Those days are rare and they never seem to fall on a weekend. :(

Come on Spring!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
i know exactly what you mean. that's why mine is dormant in the garage until the spring. in the meantime i just look at it when i pass and hope that there's truth to the global warming argument!
 

·
Cayman Enthusiast
Joined
·
9,995 Posts
Do they really still use salt? Our highway department as a less harmful mix of sand and some benign chemical. It melts the ice but doesn't harm the vehicles except of making it a dirty mess.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
Do they really still use salt? Our highway department as a less harmful mix of sand and some benign chemical. It melts the ice but doesn't harm the vehicles except of making it a dirty mess.
If your highway department uses the de-icing fluid ODOT does, it's magnesium chloride (which, of course, is a salt) with a surfactant to make the salt less corrosive. The only reason it doesn't seem as bad as sodium chloride is that they use so much less of it.
 

·
Enjoying the drive.
Joined
·
1,265 Posts
Do they really still use salt? Our highway department as a less harmful mix of sand and some benign chemical. It melts the ice but doesn't harm the vehicles except of making it a dirty mess.
Ditto for us. Good to be in Idaho.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
Do they really still use salt? Our highway department as a less harmful mix of sand and some benign chemical. It melts the ice but doesn't harm the vehicles except of making it a dirty mess.
Sand? That's nice at 80mph. I think they use some sort of stuff now besides salt around here, but it's still nasty.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
416 Posts
nah, I'm with OP

I thought I'd be able to buy snows and have some good fun, but the eventual cost of the salts corrosion that are still used is too much to bear.

When the roads are dry and not-too-salty, well, that's when I'll have my Porsche Winter fun.

PS- when I bought this car in February last year, it was covered in road salt so bad that I thought it was black- even after I test-drove it! On delivery, it was flawless. And blue. And that was fine with me!
 

·
Cayman Enthusiast
Joined
·
9,995 Posts
Whatever is used here to melt snow and ice has not harmed any of my many trucks and cars over a few decades. Modern myth?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
193 Posts
Whatever is used here to melt snow and ice has not harmed any of my many trucks and cars over a few decades. Modern myth?
Also you probably get snow a few days a year as compared with 3 months straight for some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Well, last week I crashed my 09 Cayman into the kerb due to the typical British lack of road salt and gritting... I'd much rather have a dirty car then have the £4000 of damage to my alloy wheel and suspension that was caused.

Just keep the car well waxed and the paint should be fine, no?

I am missing my baby...

J
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,552 Posts
Well, last week I crashed my 09 Cayman into the kerb due to the typical British lack of road salt and gritting... I'd much rather have a dirty car then have the £4000 of damage to my alloy wheel and suspension that was caused.

Just keep the car well waxed and the paint should be fine, no?

I am missing my baby...

J
keeping the car well waxed will help preserve the sheet metal. I think the OP is referring to the damages done to the areas of the car that you don't see [regularly].
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,495 Posts
I'm not following you, what's a myth? That using road salt to melt snow corrodes cars?

I have to say, I just had my A6 up on the lift this weekend. Absolutely zero corrosion. Looks like the day I bought it. This is it's 4th winter.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
602 Posts
We get the full monty up here , this a.m. saw a tandom truck full of rock salt throwing it everywhere, huge chunks that when the guy passes you you can clearly hear them bounce off your car, then 20 mins later saw another tandom with sand only, the combo makes for a lovely mess.....hate driving my little Mazda in the ****
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Fell lucky you don't live in Montana during the winter. The highway crews use pea gravel on the roads and the glass shops love it. In the spring their business is great replacing windshields. I spent two winters there working on a project for Alberta Energy and had a windshield replaced on my truck. :mad:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
I have to say, I just had my A6 up on the lift this weekend. Absolutely zero corrosion. Looks like the day I bought it. This is it's 4th winter.
That includes springs, struts, brake line fittings, hub assemblies, frame mounting points, exhaust fittings? If so, I am surprised. I haven't lived in an area that uses road salt in 25 years, so I have no modern experience. Nonetheless, a couple of years ago a friend that moved to Oregon from PA had a problem with his BMW leaning to one side, and it turned out to be a broken spring from salt corrosion. I saw the underside of the car, and it was definitely not like the day he bought it. Perhaps Audi does better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,402 Posts
My 2-yr old Cayman with 17K miles had severe corrosion on the exhaust flange hardware unfortunately. I also see evidence of rust on other fastners, brake line fittings, etc. under the exposed areas of the car.

I've only drove the Cayman once in salty wet road conditions with melting snow. Oh well. ;)

On my old 1998 Audi A4 (purchased new), I had my exhaust fall off after 6 years on the road here in NYC. The exhaust hangers were rusted all the way through. Had my front rotors replaced at the 4 year mark due to corrosion since it wasn't a daily driver. The rust made the metal on the front rotors flake off like a crossiant after a while. Braking still felt fine and there was no vibration on the pedal, just ugly gouges on the rotor surface. Unfortunately failing state inspection forced me to change them.

My 3-yr old G35 now has severe surface rust on all four brake calipers. They are basically black/orange now. At least the rotors still look OK.

I've got no luck with winter weather! If you want your car to fall apart, give it to me for a bit!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
It's getting ready to snow today in Dallas (again). Took wifey to work today and drove her 8 year old MB wagon to work. They throw a ton of sand and tiny rocks on the roads here, that do absolutely nothing to help traction. It does; however, create a huge mess and lovely brown dust clouds for about two weeks after the bad weather. On another rant; the leaves have been blowing around on the residential streets that my Cayman travels. After a wash last Saturday, I got my flashlight and parts grabber to clean out the radiator ducts. The leaves came out OK, but there are alot of tiny rocks and pebbles in there! Looks like I am going to be using some "creative engineering" this weekend to clean them out.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top