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Hi, I'm a new member, and I currently drive a 2006 BMW Z4 Coupe. Though a new purchase is probably a year or two away, I've started debating between upgrading to a base Cayman or a base Corvette. In both cases, I would be looking for a new, lightly-optioned vehicle in the $55K range.

I know these are two very different cars, and a couple test drives might make my decision clear one way or another, but I'd be interested in hearing from other Cayman owners (especially if they've driven a Corvette or Z4 for comparison).

Precise, responsive handling is my number one priority, which is why I'm leaning toward the Cayman. On the other hand, acceleration is nice too, which is why I'm considering the Corvette.

This would be for a daily driver in Boston, and I would be expecting to drive it all year round. For winter, I put four good winter tires on my Z4, and I haven't had any problems, even during the Boston Snowpocalypse.

The other question is how the new turbo flat-4 will compare to the NA flat-6. Will it be faster? Will there be any turbo lag? Will it be less expensive or more? I suppose no one knows the answers for certain, but it would be a factor in whether I end up saving more money and borrowing less (my initial plan) or moving up my purchase and borrowing more to get one of the last NA models.

Does anyone have a guess as to when the last opportunity to buy a new NA 2016 Cayman would be?

Thanks for any responses.
 

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Well, I have no experience with the new vette's , but once owned a 67 427 4 speed. This car had humongous low end - mid range torque. Snap our head back at 10 mph in 4th.
981's will not do this, but keep the revs up and a whole new driving experience comes alive! At 4000 rpm and above the sound alone will make you forget all about that low end torque.
And yet I was surprised at how tractable the engine is at 2500 rpm in 6th. Almost never have to downshift to pass.
 

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I get a sense that a kick in the back without too much screaming is important to you. Dumping all your monies into a new cheapest Cayman with the small engine might not leave you satisfied.

996 turbo?
 

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Most of us including myself have matured from that "traffic light drag boy racer" to someone who appreciates a well engineered car with proper handling and not necessarily the quickest of the mark.

In any case unless Porsche tweaks the new flat 4 turbo differently then you can expect a car with low end torque and good handling.
That may be the ideal daily driving sportscar.
I would wait if I was in your situation. There will be plenty CPO NA sixes should you decide then.
You did mention that you are only ready to purchase in 2 years time.




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My last car was a supercharged C6, my current car is a Cayman S. If you want handling unlike anything you have ever driven, get the Cayman. If you want power, get the Vette. There is nothing in-between in that price range. For me, part of the Porsche experience is the sound of the flat 6 at higher rpm; if that is gone with the turbo 4, I will probably get a Vette next time around. Nothing burbles like that V8.

Larry
 

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+1 to the comments below, especially driving at high revs. The fun driving occurs all trip every trip. I agree that the Vette is a stoplight car.

Also, The Cayman is uber-engineered. It is what Porsche does. The Corvette IMHO cuts a lot of corners in that department.

All of this being said, you are really asking people to recommend the taste of an apple to the taste of an orange. Or Formula 1 vs NHRA drag racing. Both camps are pretty fanatical about which they like better, but they are completely different at the conceptual level.
 

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I've heard that the c7 is a huge step forward in terms of handling. personally, at first I liked the looks of the c7, but now it looks too over the top for my taste. The cayman is just sexy without trying too hard. I like that.
 

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I traded a 2006 C6 for my base Cayman and it is "apples" to "oranges" with a vette. The vette is fun to floor from a standing start but the fun soon fades when you have to slow for traffic and the handling cannot compare to the Cayman. I could not use the vette's HP safely around town but I can drive the Cayman at 4,000 RPM all day long and have a handling blast with it. The base is fine for driving in an urban area like Boston but by the time you are ready it will be hard to find a new $55k base on a dealer's lot since they usually order them highly optioned. My dealer has a new 2014 S sitting in his lot for $65k. The MSRP is over $85k. You should consider a car like that if you can find a leftover when you are ready. If you want a new base, you will likely have to order it, so factor that lenghty process into your timeline. Good luck.
 

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I've heard that the c7 is a huge step forward in terms of handling. personally, at first I liked the looks of the c7, but now it looks too over the top for my taste. The cayman is just sexy without trying too hard. I like that.
Agreed---if styling is a part of the decision process, I think the Cayman wins hands down. Sculptured lines instead of "edgy" and that's coming from a former corvette owner.
 

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Not written in stone but reasonably informed guesses.

The other question is how the new turbo flat-4 will compare to the NA flat-6. Will it be faster?
Yes, rarely does Porsche produce a facelift that is slower.

Will there be any turbo lag?
Yes. Walter Rohrl notices Turbo Lag in a 991 Turbo S. No doubt he would feel it in a 981.2 base Cayman

Will it be less expensive or more?
When did the price of a new Porsche ever go down? Once that I know of, with the introduction of the 993, decades ago. It will go up.

Does anyone have a guess as to when the last opportunity to buy a new NA 2016 Cayman would be?
Projections are the 911 will be a split MY production year between the 991.1 and 991.2. 981.2 will appear after the US introduction of the 991.2 I would expect that MY17 will be all 981.2. Start ordering in March, 2016 for Sept 2016 deliveries. That means product of NA ends maybe May, 2016.
 

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Obviously, on this forum you will get the answers you would expect on a Porsche, probably very different answers on a Corvette forum.
 

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Will there be any turbo lag?

Yes. Walter Rohrl notices Turbo Lag in a 991 Turbo S. No doubt he would feel it in a 981.2 base Cayman

The technology to virtually eliminate turbo lag has been around for quite some time. Some are expensive but others add only a small amount of additional costs. For example a turbo can be tuned with a smaller exhaust housing that will spool the turbo quicker, and an exhaust wastegate can then be added to bleed off excess exhaust pressure at high engine rpm. The method provides virtually instantaneous power at low rpms and prevents turbo over-speeding which could result in catastrophic failure at full throttle.
 

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Will there be any turbo lag?

Yes. Walter Rohrl notices Turbo Lag in a 991 Turbo S. No doubt he would feel it in a 981.2 base Cayman

The technology to virtually eliminate turbo lag has been around for quite some time. Some are expensive but others add only a small amount of additional costs. For example a turbo can be tuned with a smaller exhaust housing that will spool the turbo quicker, and an exhaust wastegate can then be added to bleed off excess exhaust pressure at high engine rpm. The method provides virtually instantaneous power at low rpms and prevents turbo over-speeding which could result in catastrophic failure at full throttle.
Not sure what you point is but that was what Mr. Rohrl told Petevb last winter. I'll believe Walter Rohrl. He said the lag cost him two feet.

I'll guess that is important to him.
 

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I'll bet if Walter had been naturally aspirated, he would not have lost that 918 in a spin :). I agree with the comments that Walter Rohrl made. He has forgotten more about driving and performance than most of us will ever know, I expect.
 

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If you want the engine to arrive before you do, as in the Z4, get the Chevy. If you want to arrive first, get the Porsche. My 914 spoiled me for front engine cars: even a Miata felt clumsy in comparison. That 914 has cost me plenty in Boxster payments.
 
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If you are a year or two away, you can probably get a 'S' model for $55K, why buy the base when you can get an S. Vette is a nice fast car but you will probably get bored of it, at least that is what I am afraid of. I love my Porsches.
 

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It is a matter of culture we live in and personal preference, but I've much preferred handling over acceleration dating back to 1972 when I purchased a new Triumph TR-6 (cost $3950 without AM radio). Back then the definition of European sports cars were 2 seats, convertible, economical, 4 speed transmission, and handling (not necessarily in that order). Purists in the 50's and early 60's categorized the very 1st Corvette as a sports car because it fit the classification as did Austin Healey. MG's, Porsche, etc...). However, with 8 cylinders Corvette fell into the high performance classification as did the first 12 cylinder Jag. Then in the late 60s and early 70s came American muscle and the list keeps expanding.

I special ordered my '14 Basic Cayman for the very same cruising / handling reasons over 4 decades later. Racing in a straight line or circle track never interested me. Also, a sports car by design isn't suppose be be quiet as a premium 4 door Caddy.

I have never owned a Vette even though they are very nice cars. However, when I go to car shows Vettte's and Mustang's are everywhere, so I want something both unique and appealing. I buy what I like, not what many of my buddies have. I have never been out to impress anyone and I drive only what makes me happy. Best advice is for you to do the same.
 

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Not sure what you point is but that was what Mr. Rohrl told Petevb last winter. I'll believe Walter Rohrl. He said the lag cost him two feet.

I'll guess that is important to him.
My point is that it's not necessary for a turbo charged car to have turbo lag. As far as the turbo lag in the Turbo S, I can only speculate that either the power curve in the Turbo S does not lend itself to methodologies to eliminate turbo lag or Rohrl is an extraordinary perceptive driver. There was a heated debate over at Rennlist a couple years ago about turbo lag on the Porsche 997 Turbo. Pete Stout reported that he detected it, but several Turbo owners heatedly denied that there was any. Based on this I'd think it's safe to speculate that turbo lag has been reduced to such an extent on modern cars that most drivers will believe that the power delivery on a Porsche turbo is instantaneous.
 
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